Found something odd in my breaker panel


someone used two single 15 amp breakers to do the work of a double 15 amp breaker. is this safe and/or legal?
doesnt matter much, as it is a GE panel and they seem to have a bad rep. planning on replacing with a siemens that seem to be all the rage nowadays.
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Tater wrote:

Is there a mechanical link (a pin) between the breaker "handles" to force them to work together?
Jeff
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Jeffry Wisnia
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who might possibly touch the circuit and you are bright enough to test everything for voltage before assuming there isn't any. I am not that bright, so I would replace it.
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Particularly since it's probably a $5-$10 repair. Cheap insurance...
-Tim
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Toller wrote:

If the circuit it supplies is a multi wire branch circuit that serves only phase to ground loads and there are no yokes or straps on which both ungrounded conductors are terminated then it is not only legal it is best practice. If a handle tied or common trip breaker is used on multi wire branch circuits a single fault will unnecessarily deenergize both legs of the circuit. There is no good reason to have that happening unless unqualified persons will service the buildings wiring.
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Tom Horne

"This alternating current stuff is just a fad. It is much too dangerous
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"Member, Takoma Park Volunteer Fire Department"

But then it wouldn't be two single breakers where there should be a double breaker (like the OP said), would it?
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Toller wrote:

Can you see it from there? How do you know what kind of circuit the OP is talking about.
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Tom Horne

"This alternating current stuff is just a fad. It is much too dangerous
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According to Member, Takoma Park Volunteer Fire Department

I realize that this is legal in the US, but why is it best practise?
Here, we don't have any of the single yoke stuff. If it shares a neutral, or feeds the same box (without dividers), the breakers have to be gang-tripped, period. There are some exceptions which I'll mention later.
I appreciate that in most cases it's "unnecessary" to kill both circuits. But breakers aren't very smart, and I don't _want_ them attempting such judgements ;-)

You mean, like the homeowner?
We have that clause in our code, but, the assumption is that unqualified persons (eg: the home owner) _will_ service the building's wiring. So, the exceptions to the "ganged breaker" rules require such things as locked cabinets with only licensed electricians having the key.
You wanna do that with your house? ;-)
Which is why these exemptions are only applicable in commercial or industrial situations.
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Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
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imho:
Don't believe they have to be 'tied' together, unless each breaker feeds a same device.
What is this being used for? Multibranch circuit of receptacles?
later,
tom @ www.MyFastCoolCars.com
P.S. Only follow codes, not NG posts. :p
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Tater wrote:

You mean ganged?
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Tater wrote:

to all posters.....
I have two 120v 15a breakers that are doing the job of a 240v 15a breaker.
the reason I found this out is that I wanted to wire in an additional 240v breaker for a welder (completely unrelated)...anyway while looking in the box, i see bad things, like a loose ground wire wrapped around another ground wire that is screwed into the neutral bar ( i fixed that!) and other stuff.
(btw, couldn't find the proper breaker for the GE box, odd size, etc, ended up sharing the range breaker, the 2 will never be used at same time, also plan on getting new box to fix all the other issues)
ok, ok, ok, I'll get back to the story. I noticed a couple of white wires going to breakers (huh? oh 240V equipment) and found that the 240v line going to the well pump was actually not on a ganged breaker (didnt know the term), but two discrete 120v 15a breakers.
even more fun, this 240v line goes to a fusebox that is used(i guess) as a disconnect switch for the well pump.
I do see an issue where part of the pump could short out, kick off one breaker, and a repairman goes to fix it and gets 120V where there should be none, but as i said, i am going to replace the box with a bigger one to help organize the wiring and get everything up to my comfort level.
but is it legal as is?
odder and odder it gets.....
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