For the anti-Craftsman crowd... :)

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Sears is not the only one. I wont buy Ryobi either for the same reason (they make a lot of Craftsman tools too) No matter what the brand, spare parts are a big markup. If you can find the same pat through industrial supply houses, they are going to be far cheaper than the same item with the "genuine XXX brand" sticker on them.
I needed a hydraulic pump for a machine at work. I called the manufacturer and they wanted $5400, but would give us a 10% discount. Found the same pump from a hydraulics supply house for $1200. Very common practice.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

I have no argument that distributor parts are less expensive in general than OEM, nor do I have any lack of experience in using same. The point is, Ryobi/Craftsman/whoever aren't making these bearings, etc., themsleves, they're buying from the same manufacturers as are JD/Case-IH/Delta. Whether a particular bearing is available open stock has more to do w/ sheer volume than any planned obsolescence or attempt at controlling spare patrs availability.
I had a heck of a time getting a replacement rear wheel bearing for the old '59 38-series Chevy truck a few years ago when needed replacement owing to some water having collected in rear end and pitted them severely. The OEM were Timken, but the particular style is no longer used in new vehicles and numbers aren't there to continue to produce it. Finally found some "new old stock", but it took a couple of months looking.
Small bearings, for example, of the type in many hand tools just are not "common enough" to make for good markets for replacement--
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scribbled this interesting note:

We have a Sears concrete mixer. A while back the electrical switch failed on it. Having a factory Sears repair center not more than a mile from our house, I went up there to see if they could replace it. The switch was in a rubber housing (water resistant). They could find the part, and if it had still been available (listed as NLA) it would have been about $150.00. So I cut open the rubber housing to see what the actual switch looked like. I took it out, went to the local mom & pop hardware store (yes, we a fortunate enough to have a few of those still around) and found an exact replacement switch for under $5.00. Just had to fit it back into the rubber housing and seal it back up with a urethane sealer (NP-1 in this case.)
I spent far less than $145.00 worth of time fixing the problem. Sears will hold you up on some repairs. Local hardware stores can be your friend if you know what to look for!:~)
-- John Willis (Remove the Primes before e-mailing me)
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wrote in message

Many years ago I had snow blower that used an internal toothed gear as a speed reducer. When I went to B-S for the replacement I was bent out of shape over the price. I bitched about it to my neighbor who worked for an appliance manufacturer. He told to figure repair parts sold for about ten times the cost of manufacture. The high cost is related (at least in part) to the mfgr having to hold the part in inventory, tying up the money in the hope that someday someone would want it. And eventually it got sold or discarded and then became NLA.
Of course if you are looking for an industry standard part such as a bearing, switch, belt etc. you have better choices.
Charlie
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I'd like to be able to use Tecumseh lawn mower parts on a lawn mower with a Tecumseh engine.
--

Christopher A. Young
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Duane Bozarth wrote:

Amongst my tools there's a pair of diagonal cutting pliers with a notch like that in the jaws, "EDM"d into them by my cutting a lamp cord that had somehow plugged itself back in ..... I know I'd unplugged it first.
It's good for stripping wire. <G>
I just know I'm not alone....
Jeff
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Jeffry Wisnia

(W1BSV + Brass Rat \'57 EE)
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Duane Bozarth wrote:

Well, i havnt read the rest of this thread, but i can speak from experience, Craftsman hand tools are decent high quality tools. Eric
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Decent - yes Great - no They used to be better, but like most things they have been made cheaper than they used to be.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

Too bad discussing this tired subject 3 times a week can't make'm any better...
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