For all of you "second hand smoke" ninnies.

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Is I pointed out to Mugs, using the OSHA standard for the regulated toxins, you would have to smoke 150 cigarettes in a small room with zero ventilation to get even close. That is based on sitting in that environment for 8 hours to get to the DTLV. The show I talked about was saying you get the same kind of exposure with air fresheners, cleaning products, cosmetics and even foodstuffs. Unfortunately being CNN I could not see the end because they had to cut away to a correspondent who stood around in Bangladesh saying he still did not know anything ... for the rest of the hour.
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On 7/2/2016 11:41 AM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Third hand smoke:
"Chemicals that are left over after smoking land on any surface in an area where smoking has taken place. Studies have found that of chemicals in third-hand smoke, 11 are carcinogens (substances capable of causing cancer.) A few of the chemicals that have been found on surfaces after smoking include nicotine, cyanide, radioactive polonium-210, lead, arsenic, butane, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and butane.
A second way that toxins can be of concern with third-hand smoke is through a process called “off- gassing". Off-gassing occurs when substances from smoke that have been deposited on surfaces, such as nicotine, are released back into the air as gases. Through this process, tobacco residue that has built up on surfaces continues to emit toxins long after smoking has occurred.
In addition to toxic chemicals that are present on surfaces or released into the air, a third route of exposure is when new toxins are created by the interaction of substances in THS with other chemicals present in the environment. Two examples of interactions that have been documented include:
When THS reacts with nitrous oxide (for example from gas appliances or car engines) in the air creating carcinogens known as nitrosamines. When volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in THS react with ozone in the air to create formaldehyde among other chemicals.
Researchers have just begun to evaluate possible dangers, but findings thus far include:
- Thirdhand smoke (THS) was found to interfere with the healing of wounds, and also "wound elasticity" - in other words, how rapidly a wound will heal and what kind of scar will be formed. - Studies in mice have found that THS causes molecular changes in cells which lead to insulin resistance (simplistically, the precursor to diabetes.) - There is early evidence that THS may raise the risk of cancer. Nitrosamines - chemicals found in THS - above the limits recommended by the Environmental Protection Agency for children aged 1 to 6 are found in 77 percent of homes which have smokers. This is thought to translate into 1 case of cancer for every 1000 people. It's important to note, however, that this research is still very young, and most chemicals in thirdhand smoke have not yet been studied in this manner. - THS exposure in mice can result in fatty liver disease, which in turn may lead to cirrhosis and heart disease. - Thirdhand smoke exposure may result in biological changes in cells that predispose to fibrosis, which raises concern that it may play a role in COPD and asthma. - Changes in how platelets combine due to THS raises concern that THS may increase the risk of blood clots and heart disease. - THS exposure in mice results in hyperactivity, and there is concern that prolonged exposure in children could result in more serious neurological conditions."
https://www.verywell.com/what-is-third-hand-smoke-2248867
--
Maggie

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On 7/2/2016 4:36 PM, Muggles wrote:

We all know smoking kills. Smokers are suicidal.
I guess the 64k question is should we allow smokers to commit suicide or should we prevent them from jumping off the bridge.
(My gut tells me to give them a nudge but...)
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On 07/02/2016 03:38 PM, Rene wrote:

I believe the tobacco companies knowingly add chemicals to tobacco to make it more addictive. Once addicted, the weak-willed smokers can't break free.
Smokers often claim they smoke because they choose to but really they have been unwittingly duped by big tobacco's drugs.
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On 07/03/2016 08:34 AM, Red wrote:
[snip]

That makes sense, but leaves out something. How do the smokers get started? I look at smoking and see a nasty fire hazard.
BTW, I can remember riding a bus where someone in the seat behind me was smoking. The smell didn't seem to be a problem, and I was too young then to be concerned about health problems. However, I was aware of FIRE less than 2-3 inches from the back of my head.
--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.us/
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On 7/2/2016 4:38 PM, Rene wrote:

Smokers want to take everyone to the grave with them that they possibly can!
--
Maggie

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On 07/02/2016 04:38 PM, Rene wrote:

[snip]
It seems a lot of suicidal people follow the "golden rule". That is, they assume that since they want to die, that others want to die too. That, or they don't care.
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On Saturday, July 2, 2016 at 4:36:03 PM UTC-4, Muggles wrote:

I'll bet every one of those "studies" went something like this. Take the tar and chemicals from the smoke of 1000 cigarettes that accumulate on the surface in some very confined space, smear it all over a mouse that is already known to be very susceptible to developing cancer, leave it there until it causes cancer. Or take some of that goo and show that in a test tube it causes something to happen. In short, I'll bet it has zero correlation to someone catching a whiff of the smell of smoke from someone smoking 25 t away. Kind of like extrapolating that catching a whiff of a bus passing once in awhile is going to kill you.
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On 7/3/2016 8:30 AM, trader_4 wrote:

What exactly qualifies as a "whiff of smoke"??
Get back to me when you have some concise scientific proof.
--
Maggie

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On Sunday, July 3, 2016 at 1:09:08 PM UTC-4, Muggles wrote:

That was the challenge I issued to you. Being the village idiot, you respond with links that say a study was done, but not the study or it's results. WTF is wrong with you?
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On 7/3/2016 12:38 PM, trader_4 wrote:

It's not my job to prove anything about the contenc of a "whiff of smoke". You and others brought up the notion that a whiff wasn't enough exposure to cause any physical damage or reaction.
Prove your own premise.

Well, obviously, I don't communicate well with blowhards.
--
Maggie

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On Sun, 3 Jul 2016 12:55:49 -0500, Muggles

I can sy for sure a "whiff" can be more than enough to send me for my inhaler.

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On 7/3/2016 5:48 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Yesterday I found this little tidbit of info:
"1: When THS reacts with nitrous oxide (for example from gas appliances or car engines) in the air creating carcinogens known as nitrosamines. When volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in THS react with ozone in the air to create formaldehyde among other chemicals. 2: - Studies in mice have found that THS causes molecular changes in cells which lead to insulin resistance (simplistically, the precursor to diabetes.)"
https://www.verywell.com/what-is-third-hand-smoke-2248867
1. That information explains why I'd get so ill riding in a car when my parents were smoking. I wouldn't just feel bad or cough - I would get so sick to my stomach that I couldn't function for an entire day or more depending on how long I was exposed. 2. I was exposed to second hand and third hand smoke my entire childhood 'til the day I moved out. For years I was hypoglycemic having episodes of nearly passing out, and I'm now a type 2 diabetic.
--
Maggie

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On Sunday, July 3, 2016 at 11:05:14 PM UTC-4, Muggles wrote:

ROFL. If you think something that they did in a lab test tube explains why you got sick in a car from insulin resistance, you really are the village idiot.
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On 7/4/2016 4:51 PM, trader_4 wrote:

1. Riding in a car while my parents smoked made me sick to my stomach, sometimes, severely. I was told it was all in my head and there was no physical reason I should get sick. Now, we know that "THS reacts with nitrous oxide (for example from gas appliances or car engines) in the air creating carcinogens known as nitrosamines. When volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in THS react with ozone in the air to create formaldehyde among other chemicals."
Additionally, formaldehyde can make people sick.
2. Secondhand smoke causes molecular changes in cells which lead to insulin resistance (simplistically, the precursor to diabetes.)"
I was exposed to high levels of secondhand and thirdhand smoke for approximately 20 years - I'm now type 2 diabetic. The information indicates there is a connection between secondhand smoke exposure and 2 illnesses I've dealt with, so yes, I believe those explanations are valid.
--
Maggie

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On Tue, 5 Jul 2016 00:28:53 -0500, Muggles

Have you ever read all of the statistics about the dangers of having a gun in your house? That extends to your neighbor's house in some of these studies. Other safety nazi is coming after you.
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On Tuesday, July 5, 2016 at 3:27:37 AM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

+1
Her standards of proof is to find one study about anything that says something like "this suggests cause possible concerns" and BINGO, that's all we need, one study like that. Based on that hot dogs, sugar, shampoo, almost everything should be banned. My God think of the children eating those hot dogs at a baseball game!
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On 7/5/2016 9:29 AM, trader_4 wrote:

-100 You can't compare a health issue related to toxic waste with a self-defense issue related to gun ownership.
[...]
--
Maggie

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On Tuesday, July 5, 2016 at 12:54:31 PM UTC-4, Muggles wrote:

Libs can. It';s all about your need to control how everyone lives, and not being able to leave people free to live like they choose.
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On Tue, 5 Jul 2016 07:29:50 -0700 (PDT), trader_4 wrote:

Forget about long term effects. Hot dogs are actually disproportionally dangererous (as opposed to other foods) as a choking hazard.
Biting down on a hot dog can often cause the bitten-off portion to be squeezed by the relatively elastic buns. Lubricated all-around by thixotropic liquids (i.e. mustard & ketchup), it can easily be propelled directly back to the trachea, because the swallow has not yet been initiated to redirect food to the esophagus.
Worse, it is of the exact shape and size to completely block the airway.
--
http://mduffy.x10host.com/index.htm

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