Footer pulling ideas ........................

I have about 20' of 8x8x16 rebarred footer in the ground. The rebar is sticking out of it to a height of about four feet. I want to remove this last portion. From the looks of the wall during demo, it was done right, hence, there will be horizontal rebar in the footer.
Options: backhoe, the Egyptian approach, TNT, mechanical means.
I can't get backhoe access. All my friends who would form a huge labor crew are smart enough to disappear or stay inside at this time of year in Las Vegas. I used up all the TNT over the Fouth of July. Which leaves me to mechanical means.
I was thinking of borrowing an engine hoist, saddling the footer, and hooking up to the rebar. Looks like it would work to me, even if to start one end of it, so that I can prybar and lever the rest out. Anyone done this?
Any other ideas?
Steve
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I assume you mean a footing, not a cement block wall. Your footing needs to either be 8x8 20' long or 8x16 20' long. Concrete weighs about 155 # per cubic foot. If it is 8x16 20' long, it weighs about 2700 # as well as being trapped in the ground. An engine hoist is usually made to pick up a 500 # motor. I don't think you're in the same league.
Rent or hire a skid steer? Mini track hoe? Get on a first name basis with a jackhammer? If you are only removing the remains of a cement block wall, a sledge hammer, shovel, and wheelbarrow will work.
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crew
Jackhammer and 24" bolt cutters, angle grinder, or a torch for the rebar. Does the concrete have to go away? Any real reason other than being a neatnik to not just clip the vertical bars flush and bury the sucker? Or are you building something else there?
aem sends....
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24" bolt cutters? I don't think so. They might be ok for remesh and no.2 rebar, but neither is likely to have been used in the footing or wall. You would need at least a 42" bolt cutter to hand #4 rebar (a likely size to find in footings and walls.
Regards,
John
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crew
A little more info ........ yes, as stated, this is the footing to a block wall.
It must disappear, as I am going to install a pond/waterfall on the site.
I have used engine hoists before that can be rigged to lift much more than 500# motors. Will try that first, as it is free and available. If no go, then I will go to plan B, provided there is a plan B.
Steve
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You are not going to get it out in one piece with an engine hoist or anything you are likely able to physically move into position. Rent a gas driven concrete saw and cut into pieces you can manage. I just finished widening a shed door through a 6"x27"x23" kneewall. Very hard crete. Total rental for about 4ft cut and cutting from both sides was $67. Well worth it. You would only need to make about 4 or 5 cuts to get manageable chunks.
Harry K
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You are not going to get it out in one piece with an engine hoist or anything you are likely able to physically move into position. Rent a gas driven concrete saw and cut into pieces you can manage. I just finished widening a shed door through a 6"x27"x23" kneewall. Very hard crete. Total rental for about 4ft cut and cutting from both sides was $67. Well worth it. You would only need to make about 4 or 5 cuts to get manageable chunks.
Harry K
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