Following the building code, wood instead of drywall?


I have a customer whose basement flooded. The lower two feet of drywall were removed from the finished section of the basement. To simplify rebuilding and reduce possible damage my customer would like to use something like t1-11 siding where the drywall is now missing. It would be stained and sealed front and back along with the edges. Trim would hide the joints at the bottom and where the drywall meets the t1-11. My concern in doing this work is that this might not comply with the national building code?
Thank you for any help.
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There's a "national" building code? News to me.
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There's an international one - the IRC. Most states have adopted the IRC with some modifications.
R
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On Wed, 28 Apr 2010 18:28:28 -0700 (PDT), RicodJour

The International Building Code is "international" about as much as the pancake house of the same name.
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RicodJour wrote the following:

I thought IRC meant Internet Relay Chat.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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Unless there is a mechanical room enclosure that requires fire-rated partitioning, or there is plastic foam insulation that is required to be covered, any covering at all will do.
In lieu of the T-1-11 (think mold, painting and what you'll get for the $), look into PVC beadboard, such as Azek or other brand. If the customer is okay with white trim, it doesn't even have to be painted. This'll get you started: http://forums.jlconline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=28961
R
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You need to know the LBC code, or BHBC logic building code and butt head building code, if its gonna flood why finish the basement. There is a modular wall system from major manufacturer like maybe Dow or another insulation maker where panels screw and snap into place that can be removed and wont be permanently damaged by water if they are cared for after a flood. How would wood be better than drywall if you still trap moisture inside, it wont.
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On Thu, 29 Apr 2010 03:57:52 -0700 (PDT), ransley

You ever price that crap? Fabric covered Fiberglass Pink insulation board - a 10X13 basement, the quote was over twenty four THOUSAND dollars. (installed). My daughter started laughing so hard when they gave her the price she had tears in her eyes.
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On Apr 29, 8:56pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I used foamboard screwed in place so I can remove it if I ever get a mold smell, so I can the find any problems, 6 years and its fine with no mold. 24k wow I didnt know.
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On Wed, 28 Apr 2010 17:23:47 -0700 (PDT), andyeverett

    You need to contact the local code enforcement people. Personally, I don't believe it is a good idea as I doubt if the T1-11 is gong to help. It may be worse, hiding mold inside while drywall will only support mold growth on the paper outside.
    Maybe you should consider recommending cement board. Anyone used that for this use?
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Before he does anything, he needs to fix the problem. When the flooding problem is fixed, and the wall is dry, it shouldn't matter what is used to replace the drywall. BTDT
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On Apr 29, 8:36am, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

I would not use cement board. It is still porous and heavy.
I think this is a reasonable idea. I could see trying to do it as well if I had an area that I suspected could possibly flood again. Here's some thoughts.
If possible do not insulate the area. Move all utilities above the line. A non-porous or composite material would be best. If you do use wood prime and paint all ends and sides. Come up with a solution that makes the lower panels removable so in a future flood they can be removed to allow drying. Or hinge them at the top.
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Building codes are policed by municipal or other local authorities (not states or countries.) In most places, only the Fire Code part of the building code is retroactive and enforcible on repairs. The nearest city hall office that issues building permits can advise you.
--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
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