Follow on to a recent thread about replacing galvanized pipe.


Ref; a recent thread advocating the advantages of PEX in relation to replacing galvanized.
In our case not galvanized pipe. But copper.
Some homes in this area (municipal water supply) of similar age to this house (36 years) have experienced pinhole leaks in their (generally half inch) copper plumbing, within the house.
We have not had any problems with such pin holing, although even glass lined hot water tanks here traditionally do suffer from corrosion and leakage. We have replaced at least three in some 30+ years and suppliers will not warranty them for more than three years!
When we refurbished the bathroom within last couple of years we took the precaution then of replacing any copper that was within a wall. However all other plumbing is accessible from our unfinished basement.
Just had the thought that our very deeply buried cold water pipe in from the street is three quarter inch copper! Municipal stop-cock some six to eight feet down at the street, with the actual connection to the main at least another six feet below that and our own residential shut off a couple of feet above basement floor.
We guess we'd never know if the underground developed pinholes or something more serious until flow seriously decreased or failed?.
BTW. Our water is presently unmetered; whether that will change in future (climate warming, water shortages, additional growth in the area) etc. is unknown. And if it did become so the meter due to the depth of the service pipe would presumably be in the house.
But just to pose the question; suppose it did leak, underground? Is there any way we could push PEX or some other 'liner' through the three quarter copper out to the street as a replacement?
Just thinking out loud! Any comment or criticism welcomed.
Seasons greetings to all.
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terry wrote: <snip> pinhole leaks in their (generally

<snip>
If you check the ID of typical 3/4" copper and the OD of any Pex tubing that might fit inside you will see that the PEX suffers a serious downgrade in ID size from the copper, hence your water flow will be sharply reduced. If this is not a problem, then it could be done, but for most people the slow showers, and dribbly outside hoses would be too much of an aggravation. YMMV
Joe
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terry wrote:

Half-inch PEX is 5/8" OD. You can do the math, but you won't like the flow rate.
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terry wrote:

Rest easy. Buried water service lines are routinely laid using the heavier Type K copper tube. Interior piping is done with lighter Type L or <gasp> paper-thin Type M.
You should be able to find a printed marking on the existing interior pipe giving the Type.
Jim
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I'd heard that the pin-hole leaks in copper pipe was caused by too much flux being allowed to remain on the pipe after sweating. Don't know how much truth there is to that.

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Mark spake thus:

I wouldn't think so, since any flux remaining would have long ago been flushed away by the water. Sounds like an urban legend to me.
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