foggy headlights

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And when did you last see a broken headlight??? I'll bet it was a GLASS sealed beam unit.(or involved in a serious collision). Used to be you had stone holes in headlights on a very regular basis. Don't see that today ( a function of both material and "aproach angle" - sloped aerodynamic headlights bounce the stones off)
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote in

Ohhh, yeah. Remember also that those sealed-beams were made as cheaply as possible (which was partly the point behind the US sealed-beam law), so the glass was really thin.
Plastic is a lot more forgiving of impacts, so even those vehicles which present a near-vertical surface to stones do not crack the way glass lenses did.
--
Tegger

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On 05/04/2012 07:37 PM, Tegger wrote:

I never had much of a problem with glass lenses. Put many miles on vehicles with E-code headlights (basically the same thing as a sealed beam assembly, but with European beam pattern and a replaceable H4 or H1 bulb instead of the unitized halogen capsule.) Some of those lights have outlasted the vehicles on which they were first installed.
I have had to replace at least one composite headlight due to fogging and finally bad condensation inside the reflector.
I can't remember ever having a physically broken headlight...
nate
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wrote:

Hella and Cibie headlights went from car to car untill I bought a car with Quads that the big ones didn't fit - lead crystal lens on the Z-Beams.
On my '67 Peugeot I shortened the car by about 10 inches and swayed the front over by 4 inches and didn't crack the headlights (glass composite headlamps) - thankfully since they were worth as much as I paid for the car. (by the way, we FIXED that car without replacing any body panels - just bumper, grille, and battery. - good panel-beaters)

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SOME plastics are more forgiving. Lexan(polycarbonate) is one of those,and it's what's used for most headlight lenses. Other plastics get brittle with age or sun exposure.

some folks don't know enough to not follow semi-trucks on the highways. they throw stones.
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Jim Yanik
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Which is what I said back on April 28th.

But not enough to matter. Other front-end lenses tend to be made of acrylic.
--
Tegger

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Colors restrict uv destruction.
That headlight compound has a lot of grit, as I found trying to polish a cd !!!!!
Greg
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On Saturday, April 28, 2012 6:34:54 AM UTC-4, Herb Eneva wrote:

Ive used polishing compound on mine and it has worked great. I applied it by hand instead of a drill but I didnt start taking care of the problem after 10 years. I have been doing it about once a year starting at about the second year I owned my 10 year old truck.
Jimmie
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On Saturday, April 28, 2012 12:22:47 PM UTC-4, JIMMIE wrote:

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On 04/28/2012 12:22 PM, JIMMIE wrote:

hand instead of a drill but I didnt start taking care of the problem after 10 years. I have been doing it about once a year starting at about the second year I owned my 10 year old truck.

what he said. the "headlight restoration kits" you see advertised are basically just the same thing. Just sand them down with some fine grit (1000, 1500 etc.) sandpaper, then buff with rubbing compound, polish, then wax. Or just buy the kit - if you don't have a good auto body supply around, and/or don't do body work and therefore have the need to keep supplies around to cut and buff orange peel out of paint, then it's not that expensive in the grand scheme of things. Just understand that once you've done this, you've removed the UV-protective layer of your headlights, so they will "fog" up that much more quickly again. A good way to maintain them is to simply polish and wax them whenever you do your paint.
What you're seeing is a combination of actual sandblasting by road debris (which you probably won't get out) and degradation of the top layer of the plastic due to UV damage (which you *can* polish out for a nice improvement.)
nate
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note; CrystalView restorer kit includes the sealant that has UV protection,and it lasted over a year on my Integra,but then the car was stolen.
--
Jim Yanik
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On Sat, 28 Apr 2012 09:22:47 -0700, JIMMIE wrote:

Right... and if you don't have any polishing compound handy, toothpaste does a good job, too. :-)
cheers
Jules
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I have 3 vehicles. 1992, 2001 and 2007. 3 different brands. All have good clear headlight lenses. I when I wash and wax them I use Nu Finish wax even on all the plastics. This is good for fiber glass on motor homes. Found this out from a friend that has a motor home. All my vehicles still look like new despite being out in the sun. My $.02 worth WW
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harbor freight has a kit for about 10 bucks
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wrote:

More auto junk from Detroit. Back when they still made GOOD cars, you never needed to do shit like this. When a headlight burned out, you spent $5 for a new bulb, and 10 minutes to install it. If that was my vehicle, I'd raise hell with the manufacturer, and insist they replace it for safety reasons. If they dont, sue the bastards.
Dont you just love the new technology, cheap plastic headlights, cheap fuel pumps (built like kids toys) that die and leave the driver stranded, and the list goes on. Modern cars are GARBAGE!
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Cars are far more reliable than years ago. Last time I was stranded was 1986. Before that, it was common to see cars broke down on the side of the road. Very rare today.
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I'm with you, mine do break down, now and again. But much more seldom than before. My work van just rolled over 200,000 miles, and it's still a dependable vehicle.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .

Yup. I'm driving a car with 100,000 plus on it, and it starts every time.
When I was a kid, several! decades ago, a car that old wouldn't reliably make it to the grocery store.
I haven't changed a flat tire in probably 30 years. When I was a kid I did it so often I became skilled at it.
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Back in the 50's, you'd have had a ring job at 50k, rings & bearings by 80k, scrap at 100k
Every 5k clean the plugs and replace them at 10k. Not to mention carb adjustments, choke problems, points and rotor.
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wrote:

Yep-- I aim for at least 200K miles these days. And that's likely with 1 new set of plugs, no points, and a couple or 3 timing belts - but that's the only time the timing is looked at.
also the oil changes are 5-7K apart insteat of 2K. the tires last 50-60K per set. The alignment lasts and lasts. . . .
Oh-- and the body in these NY winters. used to show signs of rust in 2 yrs. My 10 yr old Impala has no rust showing. [there is some rot in the undercarriage]

OTOH- those accursed alloy wheels suck big time. [at least the early 2000 ones, and before, did-- maybe they've improved] Slow leakers within a year of new tires being installed on every type of tire I've used since 1986.
And if you think Detroit gets a pretty penny for replacement parts-- pick up some Audi, Honda or Subaru headlights for fun.
Jim
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On Thu, 03 May 2012 21:26:39 -0400, Jim Elbrecht wrote:

I've still got the original plugs in the Toyota (~250k), and the current timing belt's done 150k (it's not an interference engine, so it's become a bit of a minor amusement to see how long it lasts). Some of my '70s cars had timing chains and the replecement interval on those was only 30k (but it'd take me less than an hour to do, and they were cheap, so it wasn't like it was a big deal)

Yeah, been there with 1970s ones for sure... I had them tubed in the end (which used to be legal where I lived at the time, but I don't think is any more)
cheers
Jules
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