Flushing Out a Heater Core..Info

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wrote:

guy

it

all

be

so.

leaks

as

long

town

That's the same story I heard from long-time radiator shop owner. He closed the shop a couple of years ago due to retiring but mostly due to lack of work due to plastic replacing metal.
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On Wed, 06 Jan 2016 04:03:54 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moc wrote:

Maybe. But back in the day of brass radiators I was a regular at the radiator shop. With the plastic ones they seem to last and last. And when they do go back they are cheap to replace, so cheap they aren't worth even trying to fix. Brass was so expensive you didn't replace them unless the shop said they were past the point of repair.
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wrote:

it

all

be

This was interesting.... My replacement radiator has 2 small tube stubs just below the radiator cap. The top one is above the pressure seal and is for the overflow tube. The one below it is not used in this car. Autozone and Factory both could not tell me what it was for - guessing it was made for more than one applications. The kit in the box had a rubber vacuum cap and the factory guy said that was to put over the 2nd port if it was not needed. I put it on with a hose clamp, and a few months later the bottom blew out. I replaced with a short length of heater hose with a bolt screwed into the outlet and fastened with a 2nd hose clamp. So far that has held. I call Factory again and told them about it, and they were not interested in the problem.
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On Tue, 05 Jan 2016 12:15:52 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moc wrote:

Irontite is full of disodium tetraborate decahydrate.- AKA Borax. Don't think that is the sealer but an anticorrosion agent.
It works pretty good too, and won't block heater cores or rads.
A lot of the good sealers only "set" when they contact air - and as long as you don't run the system low, the heater core and rad don't see air to "set" the sealer.
Some products like "BarsLea"' use sodium silicate and a fiber filler - which could be a bran or powdered cork, or some inorganic filler. Depending on the filler I suppose they COULD cause a problem if not used properly
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On Tue, 05 Jan 2016 10:40:02 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moc wrote:

The white bread is temporary. A good stop leak can often last over 20 years.
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On 1/5/2016 8:40 AM, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moc wrote:

Older cars can develop pinhole leaks in the heater core which stop leak can plug. The alternative is to bypass the heater core since no one is going to spend the money to disassemble a 20 year old car to replace the heater core.
I had this issue in a 20 year old Toyota. The leak was so small that the coolant level never moved a measurable amount, but you could still smell the coolant inside the car The mechanic suggested half a bottle of stop leak which appeared to do the trick, at least for now.
Trying to fix a radiator with stop leak is not a good plan since it's relatively easy to replace a radiator. When the plastic radiator on the 20 year old Camry cracked it was less than $200 for parts and labor for a replacement, though the genuine Toyota part would have been another $500.
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sms wrote:

Don't be too sure about that ... some of us prefer older cars , and I for one need heat in the winter . My pickup is 30 years old , and has had the heater core replaced within the last 2 years . I've also replaced the valve guide seals , pan gasket , valve cover and intake manifold gaskets as well as the timing gears/chain and associated seals and gaskets .
--
Snag



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wrote:

My pickup is 20, and if the heater core let go tomorrow, it would definitely get a heater core replaced - evan ad 340,000km
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On Tue, 05 Jan 2016 23:01:02 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

My pickup is 21 and I too would replace the heater core. I like my older truck and I keep it in good shape.
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wrote:

I've done it many times - and on cars well over 20 years old.

Stopleak won't seel a cracked plastic tank or a blown tank seal. I used to replace a lot of "O" rings and crimp plates on pastic tank/aluminum core rads - particularly the ones that used the aluminum tabs from the core end plates instead of a stainless steel crimp plate. I converted a LOT of them over the years on Toyotas. Unlike brass rads, aluminum rads generally do not fail from corrosion in 3 or 4 years.
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On Tue, 05 Jan 2016 22:28:44 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

If the aluminum radiators are better, why cant they make the tanks out of aluminum too?
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On Wed, 06 Jan 2016 04:11:05 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moc wrote:

They can. Look at any expensive hot rad radiator. Then look at the price - - - - - - - -. Then you have your answer.
And aluminum has NO reszistance to fatigue cracking. If it bends AT ALL stress build up - so any vibration transmitted to the tank and other parts of the rad WILL cause it to fracture in time.
Plastic is stiffer and does not fatigue crack (where brackets mout to tanks, for instance)
Moulded in brackets and everything with plastic tanks make them a LOT cheaper than aluminum - and the failure rate on plastic tanks is no higher than the failure rate was on bras rad tanks - whith the mouting straps coming off, the hose spigors breaking out, the tank seals letting go ----
Why do you think there are so many fewer rad shops today than there used to be - with 10 times as many cars on the road, and the average fleet age almost double.
10 year old cars used to be junk. Most cars never hit 100,000 miles. The average radiator was repaired at least twice in that time, and most were recored before 10 years or 100,000 miles.
Today it is nothing for a rad to last 150,000 or 200,000 miles, or 15 years. My 20 year old truck still has the original rad.(at 340,000km)
Of all the cars I've owned in the last 40 years (at least 12), all of which went well over 200,000 km and 12 years (some 18) I've only had to replace one rad - and that was on my Pontiac. (to be fair, it had over 300,000km on it)
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On Tue, 5 Jan 2016 07:28:45 -0800 (PST), "Jack G."

Never had that happen in 50 years.. Never seen it either.
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Jack G. wrote:

BZZZZT wrong again Binky . Pinholes are caused by electrolysis , which is what happens when the coolant becomes "worn out" and the Ph changes (I can't remember if it gets acidic or basic) . It must be changed on a regular basis or it becomes an electrolyte , and the resulting electrical current erodes aluminum parts . Distilled water will NOT protect your cooling system .
--
Snag



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On Tuesday, January 5, 2016 at 5:19:42 PM UTC-8, Terry Coombs wrote:

Still stuck on stupid.
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Jack G. wrote:

Yes you are , but that ain't my problem .
--
Snag



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