Fluorescent lamp switch

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I have a fluourescent lamp that has a button that I have to hold down for a few seconds for the light to turn on. The switch is broke. Anyone know where I could find such a specialty switch? I searched around but no luck.
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It is probably a NO momentary closed switch. Any Radio Shack or electronics store would have one. Searched where?
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SQLit wrote:

No, it's not that easy. I think Joseph was correct about the switch type. The OP didn't say it, but likely that lamp has a second (usually black) button you push to turn it off. The first (usually red) button closed a toggling switch to apply power to the lamp, but when held down a second momentary contact closed the filament circuit just like a "starter" did. After a couple of seconds the filaments were hot and when you released the button an inductive spike from the ballast started the flourescent's arc.
Pushing the second button toggled the switch off. Sometimes there was no second button 'cause the first button had an "alternate on-off" switch action in addition to the momentary contact.
If the OP really loves that old lamp he could replace the "broke" switch with a slide or toggle on-off switch plus a NO momentary closed pushbutton switch. It'd take two separate actions to light the lamp, but only one to shut it off. That's providing the OP knows what to look for and can trace out the wiring so he can figure out how to connect the two switches properly.
That's probably what I'd do if that old lamp held memories for me and I was going to be the only person using it. :-)
Jeff
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Jeffry Wisnia

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It is actually one of those magnifying glass lamps like on workbench tables. It's a nice one so I want to fix the lamp if I can. I took the broken switch apart to see what is wrong and how it works. The button had a piece broken off and it is missing so I can't fix it.
The switch similar to described above. There are two parts actually. One part turns on or off each time the button is pressed via a ratcheting spinner. The 2nd part turns on only momentarily when the switch is pressed.
I have seen 3 position toggle switches with the 3rd position spring loaded. If I could find one of those I could make it work. I tried looking in digi-key but didnt see one, though.
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User Example wrote:

Yes, but the ones like that I've seen are all "center off" types which make a momentary contact in one direction away from center and will toggle and stay in the opposite direction. That won't do it for you, you need to connect power to the lamp and then "play starter" by making and breaking the filament circuit.
How about replacing the present switch with one of the commonly available "twist" lamp switches and drill another hole to mount a NO momenttary contact push button switch to start the lamp with?
STOP THE PRESSES! Can you fit this one in?
http://www.egaynor.com/edwin_gaynor_lampholders/666.htm
It has the switching characteristics you need, and is the "two button" style I was bloviating about in my previous post. You'd need the "one lamp" model.
HTH,
Jeff
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Jeffry Wisnia

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replying to Jeff Wisnia, Shorty wrote:

Thanks Jeff I looked for hours to find one of these. Thank you 100 thank yous. This is for my Ledu drafting table light that I purchased in 1976.
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It may be worth buying a cheap fixture for undercounter lighting and taking the switch out. They sell for less than $10.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

Ah, but I betcha those will use a regular on-off switch and a cheapo glass bulb bimetal neon starter and paralleled capacitor (without a can) wired right in.
I fixed GE undercounter light two weeks ago and it used one of those wired in starters. (Problem was just a thermal fuse glued to the ballast which had died of old age. wouldja believe I had a perfect match replacement thermal fuse in my "hell box"?
Come to think of it, if he could fit in one of those wire-in starters he could solve his problem with a simple on-off switch. Yeah, he could take the starter out of the $10 light, along with the switch, couldn't he.
Have we overkilled this one yet?
Jeff
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Jeffry Wisnia

(W1BSV + Brass Rat \'57 EE)
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replying to User Example, Larry wrote:

Hi, I have the same kind of lamp with the same problem. It has a 22w circline round fluorescent bulb. I finally found a switch after having the lamp tore apart for a long time and now I can't remember how to wire it back up. My switch has 4 contacts, socket has 2 blk and 2 white wires and of course 1 white and 1 black feed. Do you have any idea where I can find a wiring diagram for this setup. Thanks, Larry
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On 12/31/2014 12:44 AM, Larry wrote:

Yes, I too have one of those magnifiers and hate that kind of switch. But you just reminded me, I have 3 electronic ballasts which could be used for this lamp ... no starting needed and the ballast, actually a switching high voltage power supply, ionizes the gasses without starting. I'll have to see if I can retrofit one into the magnifier.
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replying to Larry, gertab wrote:

switch
1
What is the brand and model of the replacement switch you purchased? I was hoping that Grainger would sell a replacement switch since their Lumapro 6MNU0 matches what I have. They told me today (9/15/15) that they don't sell the replacement switch.
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replying to User Example, Jacksf wrote: I actually found a lamp with a similar two-button switch and old floresent workings. I'm upgrading it to an LED strip and want to keep the look of the red and black push buttons so replacing them with similar switches that still have red and black caps. Technically only the red will need to be pressed once for on and again for off, but will maintain the look vs replacing with rocker switch.
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replying to Jacksf, Shorty wrote:

Where did you get the LED strip?
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Don Klipstein wrote:

Thanks everyone for the ideas. They are all good. I am not sure what I will do, though. There isn't any spare room in the lamp to add a starter and it would be hard to even add an extra switch in there. I'll have to do some ciphering and figure out what I want to do. The link you provided will be helpful.
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Check out Ace Hardware. They usually have, behind the service counter, a box of frequently used switches. I was surprised at the unusual stuff available.
User Example wrote:

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User Example wrote:

Likely easier to buy a new lamp. I would look for one that has a more modern circuit and does not need that kind of switch while I was at it.
It is a monetary contact switch maybe with a on off switch combined with it.
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Joseph Meehan

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replying to Joseph Meehan, Shorty wrote:

It would be easier for me to buy one but I shelled out 100 dollars for it in 1976 and they still cost 100 dollars. Why spend 100 when I can fix it with a switch?
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You could try the manufacturer, as some of those switches can be proprietary to the light, and hard to come by as aftermarket items. But don't be surprised if the new switch with shipping costs more than replacing the whole light.
AMUN
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replying to Amun, Randy wrote:

I have this type switch in my drafting lamp w/ 2 -18" FL bulbs. The base clamps to the table and the light floats over the table. New it cost 120 dollars. Good used ones are 50 to 75 dollars.
Does anybody know where I can just buy a switch? I'd put a starter in it and a regular switch in but I'm not sure of the wiring schematic.
Seems like the switch would be a common thing, but I just searched for 2 hours on line. tthhhhhht Zero~
Thanks for listening to my cry like a baby.... Randy
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