Fluidmaster fill valve problem

Hello,
I am trying to replace the the works in my toilet tank using the Fluidmaster 404LG repair kit. Everything was going great. Then I got to the point where you flush water through the uncapped fill valve and check for leaks. All went fine, no leaks and water was definitely flowing through the fill value and into the bowl. So, I turned off the water and placed the valve cap assembly back on the fill valve and locked it into position by turning it clockwise an eighth of a turn. I turned the water back on, but it was stopped at the fill valve--when the cap is on the fill valve it does not let any water flow into the tank. So, something is wrong with how I put the cap back on, or perhaps I jostled some part of the valve? I have tried and re-tried several times and can not get water to come out of the capped valve. Before I call a plumber, does anyone have any advice?
Thanks, Dawn
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Dawn wrote:

There are some YouTube videos about Fluidmaster valves.
When you remove the cap and turn on the water valve, there should be a strong stream of water out of the Fluidmaster body (keep hand over it so it won't spray the ceiling). If not, the water line is clogged, maybe by the rubber seal at the bottom of the toilet tank where it goes into the Fluidmaster body. Also when you manually move the arm with the cap removed, do you see the stainless steel pin move in and out the tiny hole in the middle of the rubber plug?
It's going to be cheaper to buy a second Fluidmaster valve than to call a plumber.
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On Sun, 26 Sep 2010 13:54:12 -0700 (PDT), "larry moe 'n curly"

I was thinking the same thing. $10 will get the OP a new Fluidmaster valve. Calling a plumber will probably cost well over $100. Before replacing anything, take off the supply tube, place it into a pail, and tuen on the supply valve. If the water pressure is low, replace the supply line and the valve. Those thin lines are known to clog, and those valves can have their washer come loose and partially or fully plug the valve. Replacing all three parts will cost $20 or less.
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I suppose it's also possible to call the manufacturer.
Never mind. That's crazy talk.
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wrote:

Only if you're foolish enough to buy Fluidmaster.
I had one break while I was out of town and 10,000 gallons of water flooded my house. I later talked to several plumbers and every one said that Fluidmaster problems keep them in business. They won't be in my house again. YMMV.
KC
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wrote:

What brand of flush valve do you use?
I've replaced, perhaps 8-10 flush valves over the years with the Fluidmaster brand. None have ever failed, that caused a leak like you mention.
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Oren wrote: ...

Only place I've ever seen them fail is in locations w/ high water pressure -- that will eventually fatigue them and the will break at the tank inlet.
But, shouldn't have excessive water pressure, anyway... :)
--
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And shouldn't buy plastic fill valves. Spend twice the amount and buy a brass one that will last 5 times as long. Cheap plastic plumbing parts are junk, and you'll be replacing them every few years, as well as being a source of a flood. Every plumbing item in my house is metal. Copper pipes, brass valves, fill valve, supply pipes, etc. The only plastic is the PVC drain pipes, which are not under pressure and work fine.
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On Wed, 29 Sep 2010 00:22:56 -0500, jw wrote:
[snip

I've had several plastic shower heads (even one with a light). They fail in a few months. I now have a metal one that's lasted for years. It cost less than one of those plastic ons, too.
--
87 days until The winter celebration (Saturday December 25, 2010
12:00:00 AM).
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On 29 Sep 2010 22:55:44 GMT, Mark Lloyd

It all depends on your water. If you live in the North East or Mid West where the water is pretty good all of that may be true but if you live somewhere where the water sucks (like Florida), brass will corrode up on you in no time. My wife bought a $100 shower head and it lasted about a month before I was drilling out all the holes again. Delta has replaced my "lifetime" bathroom faucets twice in 10 years. Plastic is the stuff that lasts a long time.
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Hi Dawn,
Try releasing the float lock called the Leak Guard. This lock keeps the float cup from falling will is what turns on the water. The Leak Guard should be hooked to the tank lever so when you flush the toilet it unlocks the float and allows the toilet to fill. For more help call 1-800-631-2011 and speak to a Tech.
FM Tech
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