Fluctuating Water Pressure

This is actually a commercial facility, but there seem to be knowledgeable people on this NG so here goes:
Water pressure raises and lowers in a lab near the end of a long plumbing run (200+ feet). For the most part it doesn't cause a big problem, but there are 2 model trimmers with 1/4 supply connectors that won't function properly with the pressure shift. Typically the pressure drops, staff or students adjust the valve to compensate, then water pressure increases causing leaks and even hoses to pop off their connectors. It's an old building, about 50 years, and has had numerous remodels over the years, not all them of good. One could simply throw money at the problem, resizing supply lines and install pressure regulators and hammer resistors, but we don't plan on being at the facility more than a year.
Is there an inexpensive yet reasonably effective fix?
Thank you for your opinions and if this question should be addressed to a different newsgroup please let me know.
LR
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Laughing Rock wrote:

A possible fix would be to add a supply reservoir so that there is sufficient volume to drive the equipment indirectly. A relatively inexpensive regulator could be added although if the pressure drop is excessive it might be necessary to add a small charging pump. Depends on what the definition of "inexpensive" is...
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Yes, inexpensive is a relative term.
I hadn't thought of a separate reservoir. That could work, although it may be one more thing that needs babysitting. I'm leaning toward the pressure reducing valve and expansion tank idea that Speedy Jim mentioned.
Thank you,
LR
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Laughing Rock wrote:

A pressure reducing valve and, maybe, an expansion tank as a pressure reservoir ought to do it for less than $200.
http://www.accentshopping.com/store/plumbing/valves/waterpressreduc/N35BU-34.asp for pic
I like the XT exp tank as a reservoir because it will effectively smooth out pulses in pressure and compensate for sudden droops as well: http://www.zurn.com/pages/catalog.asp?ProductGroupID &OperationID
Jim
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http://www.accentshopping.com/store/plumbing/valves/waterpressreduc/N35BU-34.asp
Thanks Jim.
Good links!
I think the expansion tank and the pressure reducing valve might be just the right fix. The price is right and the link you provided even had an installation diagram.
Many thanks.
LR
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I hope that, when you say "expansion tank", you're actually thinking of one of those 20-30 gallon pressure tanks designed to be fed from a well-pump, and not one of those 2-gallon tanks intended to sit on a water-heater.
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Goedjn wrote:

All depends on the volume of water he's using. I seem to recall him saying 1/4" hose connections or the like.
Jim
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That's correct, a 1/4" hose connection with the valve closed approximately 75%. I don't know the GPM but it's very low.
LR
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