Flooring question part 2


A few weeks ago I posted a question regarding getting rid of ceramic tiles. Thanks to all who posted their answers. I appreciate it. I elected to use a hilti and floor scraper.
Now my problem is getting rid of the dry glue and dealing with the cement floor.
This is a basement hallway and bathroom that will have heavy foot traffic. I am having a really tough time getting the glue up. It's yellow in color. I tried Maurtic acid, brute force, heat guns, with tile scrappers, sanding, steel brushes. The only way I can soften it up a bit is steam from a wallpaper steamer and scrape but it needs several minutes of steam and then it only gets some of the glue up.
The new floor is a floating vinyl tile floor (15 1/2" tiles) called Dura Ceram. it has a powered limestone base and textured vinyl coating.
How smooth does this floor have to be for the floating vinyl. I can't get all the glue up and I have to re-epoxy or recoat the floor. Can I leave the glue in place, smooth out any trowel marks and ridges as best I can and also can I even re-epoxy over this glue or does all this glue have to come up.
Thanks for the pointers!
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Just a thought? Rent a round floor sander with a large grit. This should grind it off. If you want good results on finished floor, preparation is very important. WW

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Any uneveness will eventually telescope thru the vinyl, especially if it is heavy traffic.
How about using a drum-shaoed sander like those used to refinish wood floors, with a heavy grit, to bring all the glue down to a smooth surface?
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You need to get the glue up. The best tool for the job is a floor scraper with plenty of elbow grease. It will take a lot of pressure, but you may be surprised how quick it goes. This is a two handed job with full body weight. Make sure we are both talking about the same or similar tool: http://www.craintools.com/fs-tear-outtools.html Make sure to get a package of fresh blades - you'll know when you need to change one.
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The Henchman wrote:

When using vinyl tile, think of the fairy tale of "The Princess and the Pea." The least little thing will cause a bump in the tile (eventually). It may not be reasonably possible to get sufficient stuff off the floor without resorting to some sort of grinding technique.
If it was me, I'd just bury the corpse, so to speak; cover the stuff with quickset or floor leveling compound.
Afterthought: As you're trying to remove the existing nastiness, application of COLD might help. Buy a 25# block of dry ice, place it on a section of the floor, let it sit for a minute. Move the block of dry ice to the next section, and chisle away the frozen crap. Move to the next section.
Never tried it, but it would be a fun experiment.
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Umm... A floating vinyl tile floor is a floating floor with a vinyl tile pattern printed on the colored layer on the top of the rest of the floating floor system... It isn't vinyl tiles, nor is it attached or glued to the floor...
~~ Evan
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Evan wrote:

Ah! Okay, thanks. Learn something new every year.
That said, what's the fuss about getting the floor smooth?
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