Floor Finish ?

I have finished sanding the floor and want to use a water based poly. Is there anything special about water based that I need to know? I have always used oil based in the past.
I just read that with water based poly you should use a base coat. After you apply the base coast do you sand before putting on the first coat of poly?
Thanks Chris
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Chris wrote:

Handle it gently or you will get bubbles. You'll probably get them anyway. You want the water base to keep the wood as light as possible?
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dadiOH
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base poly is suppose to give. I am trying to keep the wood looking as natural as possible. These floors are 60 years old and this is the first time that they have ever been re-done.
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Chris wrote:

Keep in mind that your floor will look markedly different with water poly. It has its uses but IMO wood looks dead with it...flat, no color, bluish...
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In

Finishes look fine when I use it. Sheen not as high as varnish or oil poly but certainly good looking. Waxes easily and can be re-coated in short periods of time. Perfect for antique furniture, too.
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On 2/16/2012 1:18 PM, Chris wrote:

the main thing you need to know about water based poly is that it will turn out looking like plastic and fake. And milky looking if over a dark wood. Use some real floor finish if you want it to look like something.
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Steve Barker
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water base can turn soft if exposed to water for a while.
oil based is far better choice
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In wrote:

Wrong: Try it.
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In typed:

BS - simply use the one marked for floors. In my experience it outlasts the oil type, brush marks settle out faster and application is easier. It sounds like a lot of the responders here have never used it and know now of which they speak. If in doubt, buy a small can & choose an area not normally visible when furniture is replaced, and try it out next to a square the same size as oil based. I suspect you'll really like it. The soapy water cleanup is a blessing also; my brushes last a LOT longer using the water based stuff. It looks white in the can, but you won't see that after it's dried. See product container for sanding between coats, etc.
HTH,
Twayne`
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Chris,
About 15 years ago I put oak floors in my family room and kitchen. I did four or five coats of a water-based satin poly with a light sanding between coats. I didn't use any base sealer, just the poly. The floors looked great and I really liked the lighter finish.
However, with a 75-pound dog and kids they didn't hold up very well. The high traffic areas needed to be redone in about five or six years. Being easily house-blind I waited until the dog was dead and the kids gone. At year ten I sanded out the damaged areas and re-did the whole thing with three or four coats of an oil-based gloss. The floors looked great (somewhat distressed in the kitchen and next to the patio door) and I really liked the darker finish. Five years later they look like I just did them last week. I expect they may outlast me.
If you use a water-based poly just plan on touching them up every few years. (Even says so on the can.) If I could time travel I would use the oil-based from the start. I like wood floors, light or dark.
Good luck.
dss
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Just keep using oil based and your results will still look great after many years. Water based is moisture sensitive and nowhere near as abrasion resistant as oil based poly.
Joe
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In

In my experience there is little to no difference in lifetime of either oil or water based. I've even used iit on my cement garage floor for where the tires track to make it easier to sweep out the winter sand & salt. It lasted longer, if anything, than the previous oil based.
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In typed:

Can you read?
1. Pick up can 2. Prepare to read something 3 Read the labels on the can; all labels.
Now you have answered your own question. If not, there will be a phone number on the label to call. 1. Pick up phone 2. Dial that number 3. Ask your question of whoever answers. 4. Follow their instructions.
Assumption: Greater than third grade reading comprehension level.
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The pre-finished oak floor I recently purchased came with water-based poly. I think the company said that it's 5 or 6 machine-applied coats. It comes with a 25 year warranty so presumably they expect it to last for quite a while.
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On 2/18/2012 4:27 PM, snipped-for-privacy@brainchampagne.com wrote:

think the company said that it's 5 or 6 machine-applied coats. It comes with a 25 year warranty so presumably they expect it to last for quite a while. oh there's no doubt the wb poly is durable. But they still look fake. I can tell a prefinished one from the street.
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Chris,
I am often the odd man out in this group. Just saying so you know.
I have used both. The higher grades of the water based do a good job and last a long time. In this case you really do get what you pay for. They cost more than the oil based. In a lot of cases the extra expense it worth the cost.
With bare wood a screening after the first coat is a good option. The water based product will raise some grain after the first coat. Following label directions no additional sanding between coats is desired or needed.
Some will say it is harder to get an even sheen or a uniform coat. I say thin to win and repeat a couple of extra times to get the shine you want. Globing it on is not the way to go.
Just in case you have an old lambs wool applicator, don't use it. Buy the one made for water based, wash it well and use it again. Using the lambs wool, made for oil will give you those bubbles other mentioned.
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Colbyt
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