flooding in basement - need help fast!

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the waste pipe for my sump pump disconnected last night and I have 3 inches of water in my basement. I managed to reconnect the pipe, my question is how long can I have my pump run continuously before it needs a break. It's a small pump.
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Impossible to answer without knowing anything about the pump beyond "it's a small pump."
Your best bet is to call the manufacturer and ask them.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Run the pump for as long as necessary even if you kill it. Pumps can be replaced and are cheap compared to water damage.
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Just run it until it breaks, or until the smoke starts leaking out, whichever comes first.
Pumping water without much pressure isn't much work and what these pumps are designed to do. Repeatedly starting and stopping is harder on a motor. -----
- gpsman
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thanks, this is my first flood. Any tips on what I need to do? The water is down to about 1" now, provided the pump keeps working what other tools will I need to get my basement back to normal? I guess I should get a wet dry vac for the water that doesn't make it to the pump, anything else before I go?
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wrote:

- Do NOT buy a cheap wet-dry vac! Just don't. And DO get a big one, no matter how much you think otherwise. Trust me.
- DO read the instructions before using the vac to pick up water.
- After the vac tank fills with water, you have to drain it somewhere. If the sump pump's hole is full of water, where ya gonna go with the shop vac? Probably upstairs & outside, which means you and a helper will be lifting a lot of sloshy weight, with your fingers under an edge that the Chinese manufacturer didn't smooth out very well. Pick up some cheap garden gloves.
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Also, consider purchasing a good capacity dehumidifier, and if your basement gets cool get one that operates in low temperature not just your basic one. By capacity I'm not referring to the size of the water collection hopper, but the ability to remove water from the air. In fact, if you get one that will allow hose discharge and bypass the tray just get the drain hose and let it run into your sump. That way you can set it and forget it.
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clipped

Or just fill it half-way. Or, if there is a window in basement,put the vac outside and suck the water up from outside.
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On Fri, 02 Mar 2007 15:45:27 +0000, JoeSpareBedroom wrote:

If he gets a big one its gonna be hell lugging it up the stairs. No point in getting a big one if he cant lift it when its full of water right?
No point in firing up the shop vac until the sump has sucked the water down I think. So the sump pit is a good place to dump the water.
My basement flooded like so last month. I used my shop vac but I had to get a nice attachment to suck the water out of the carpet. I actually did not drain it into the sump pit as my water gets dirty and the sump already was in need of a cleaning, so I took it to the basement toilet...
Do indeed get a dehumidifier. I borrowed one from my aunt and ran it for 2-3 days. It got tons of water out of the air. At the very least it will tell you when your basement is returning to safe levels of humidity.
And of course get your self a nice fan to keep the air circulating. I eventually had mine at the bottom of the basement steps blowing the air upstairs. you can blow it out a window or whatever you like.
The water should serve to keep the sump pump cool. A sump works much harder when it runs on a dry pit. but once the water is drained do not be surprised to see water steaming off the case of the sump...
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Shop Vac makes a wet/dry Vac that has a built in pump. It works great--sucks up at about a 10 GPM and pumps out at about 5 GPM. Obviously it will eventually fill up (after approx 2 min)--but will empty itself if you stop taking water in. MLD
wrote:

vac?
a
gloves.
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I like the idea of a GOOD shop vac. What typically happens in cellar floods, there is a lot of water and wet stuff that is distant from the sump pump. So, he will be able to pour the water into the sump easily enough.
My shop vac is one of the old 6 gal metal ones. I'd love a 16 gal plastic one, but havn't needed it, yet. I've learned that after any wet pickup, I have to leave the top off the vac, so it is allowed to completely dry.
--

Christopher A. Young
You can\'t shout down a troll.
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Did it bring dirt in? When I had 5' of water everything was covered with mud. I found the only thing that removed it was waiting until the water level receded, and then hosing it all down and squeeging it into the sump..
Obviously you will want a dehumidifier.
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....and maybe a good floor fan, to blast some air circulation into corners and behind things he can't move. Long extension cords, too.
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no dirt except what was on the basement floor. The water that leaks into my house is ground water so it's extremely clear. I don't think there would have been any problem if it wasn't for the fact that the previous owner joined two pieces of pvc with a rubber connector and metal clamps then drywalled over it. I wonder if I'm going to have to take out all of the drywall along the pipe to make sure he didn't use any more.
Toller wrote:

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There should be prisons for previous owners who do things like that. A friend of mine just had a new furnace installed. The installer had a WTF? moment when things weren't working right. He found that the previous owner (or an installer) had stuffed the cold air returns with pink fiberglass batts.
Prison for these people, I say. But first, a mild beating, a la Tony Soprano.
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I can trump that. My previous owner put 3 20a circuits on a 50a breaker, and both hots of a multiwire circuit on the same leg.
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Beatings, I tell you. Behind a dumpster. Nothing crippling, just enough to produce strange skin discolorations and a small limp for a few weeks.
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I had one of those (that last thing). A new receptacle in the bathroom (where someone could plug in a hair dryer) had hot connected to one circuit and neutral to another. That other circuit (on the same leg) had a refrigerator and microwave on it.
--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com
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On Fri, 02 Mar 2007 07:52:49 -0800, Joe wrote:

Take some photos for the family scrapbook... I would open the wall now while you are already in the working and cleanup mode. That rubber joining two pvc pipes is usually what you get at the check valve. You do have a check valve still? Maybe one person put the connection on, and some other person drywalled it in now knowing what he was doing/what it was.
For me my water is basically clean, but there is sticky red dirt that comes. Over the course of 1 year the pipe will become filled with red mud. So I put a cleanout on it. And every 6 months I snake the pipe. Sucks by my pump runs every 3 minutes. I also have to disassemble the pump and clean it because the pump volume decreases as it gets all coated with mud.
I was at a home my mother bought and the water to the refridgerator was dripping. I kept looking behind the wall in the next room, and back in teh kitchen and scratching my head for like 30m as to where the shutoff valve could be. At the end as the saying goes, when all other posibilities are exhausted, the answer is no matter how much you hate it, the possibility left. Took a hammer to the wall and found one of those elchepo piercing water valves...
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wrote:

Duh. How could I forget booze? You're entitled to drink heavily today. And, if there are any power tools you've wanted, but couldn't justify them to the Mrs., this is a perfect time to start thinking like a creative advertising exec.
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