Flight MH370 disaster - new theory (asphyxia - air problems)

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<stuff snipped>

So you'd think, but reading how they botched repairs on aircraft that subsequently crashed, they might not have looked for damage in unexpected areas. It's pretty obvious, at least to me, that the guiding repair principle is to return the asset to the air as quickly as possible. That's why bad repairs almost always involve shortcuts.
I know I've seen a list of repair-induced crashes and near-misses somewhere on the net. Just haven't found it yet. I do know that when working on engines they try very hard NOT to break hydraulic connections and they sometimes do that by improperly hoisting engines with lots of stuff still connected.

I suspect when they start retrieving large sections of the airplane they will be doing some very similar testing if it's clear mechanical/structural failure was the cause and not an explosion, meteor, suicidal pilots, hijackers, aliens or Steven King in need of a new mystery book subject.

There's nothing sadder that families trying to cling to hope their loved ones are still alive. The phone ringing stories illustrate how much they want to believe there's hope. A lot of times families in grief become victims of swindlers posing as mystics that can contact the dead or worse, lead them to believe they are still alive. I remember one particularly odious con man team that was preying on MIA families during the post-Vietnam era, trying to convince them their loved ones were imprisoned in Cambodia, etc. At the time I thought "can you GET any lower as a human being?"

connected - and airline says they have rung crew's phones"
I read that late last night and thought "don't they know that the ringing noise they hear when dialing has very little to do with a phone ringing on the other end?" They've dialed into switchboard/network that will make the ringing sound to the caller until the phone is deactivated - from the network. The phone could have been burned in the fires of Mordor and still seem to be ringing. But that's another thing. When US 93 was hijacked, there was an incredible amount of cellphone calling from the cabin before it crashed. The silence of MH370 literally screams "instantaneous mayhem."
I assume they'll locate the crash site within the next 5 days as US and Chinese search assets are put into position. So far the Malaysian government seems reluctant to accept our help. That's not unusual, unfortunately. After the Snowden revelations a lot fewer people seem to trust our good intentions.
--
Bobby G.




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On Tue, 11 Mar 2014 12:39:43 -0400, "Robert Green"

The MAF is now saying they tracked the plane for over an hour after it turned around. If they had a decompression I would expect them to quickly dive to 6000-8000 feet so they had enough air to survive.
They are starting to suggest it may have been a hijacking by the flight crew.
They have moved the search to the Straight of Malacca and I suppose the Indian Ocean.
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On Tuesday, March 11, 2014 2:54:11 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Anything is possible, but one thing we don't know is what exactly the MAF is basing all this new theory on. Do they have consistent hits, enough that they are highly confident it's this plane? Or do they just have some intermittent contact with something that might be some other small plane, etc. And if they have any decent supporting evidence, why did it take 2 - 3 days before they started to come up with this? The radar data is available and you'd think within hours of the crash it would have been analyzed. If they have hits from the area at the time the plane disappeared, a somewhat consistent hit trail back over Malaysia, etc, then you'd think we would have heard about it in hours. Seems more likely they have some hits of something, we don't know how many, where, when, etc. Just like the floating debris, oil, that have so far turned out to be wrong, could be nothing.
As I said in another reply, post 911 one simple change that could have been made would be to make it impossible to turn off the radar transponders, the ADS-B, etc once a plane is in the air. I can't think of any reason you would need to turn it off. That would have gone a long way to resolving this.
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wrote in message news:95b02554-320f-4775-ae05-

My vote is that it's still where the transponder died and that the searchers missed it. It may have landed on the water like Sully's plane and then just slipped under, largely intact. From the latest news, (Chinese sat photos) it seems it's just sitting in the ocean in big pieces right along the known flight path. That many countries involved in a large search effort has all the makings of a Mongolian Cluster Fu&.
--
Bobby G.



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On 3/10/2014 11:51 PM, Home Guy wrote:

After all the changes in theories and discalimers about what is known, I'm thinking someone hijacked the plane and has some super-hackers messing with electronics and data systems. Not that I know anything about flight electronics.
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On Monday, March 10, 2014 11:51:20 PM UTC-4, Home Guy wrote:

test
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bob haller full-quoted: (...)

Was there a reason why you full-quoted my entire post - just to add "test" to the end?
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wrote:

The manual for a specific plane is probably in the plane's glove box. Right above the co-pilot's knees.
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> > Seat cushions and bits of foam are not really very big targets

effort

Oh, I hadn't notice that groaning pun before! (-:

We've got commercial ships joining in now - we've gone well into the marginal costs - the question is who typically pays them? I haven't been able to find as much information about that as I thought I might. The AirFrance crash had duelling deep pockets, with AF and Airbus each paying to look for evidence that the other was "on the hook" for the crash.
--
Bobby G.




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As much as it pains me to admit this on lose a little respect from you on my prowess with verbiage, I hadn't noticed the pun before either.

Probably the same here. Although I also have to wonder about whether the airlines and makers have sorta come to the conclusion that there is NO liability for either until it is found. Sorta like trying to convict for murder without a body OR evidence.
--
"Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive,
but what they conceal is vital."
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<stuff snipped>

A subconscious "submarine" pun. Hmm.

been

paying to

Oh, they've convicted people of murder without a body before. People v. Scott. It's messy, but it can be done. Boeing would certainly love the outcome to be a hijacking rather than any on-board mechanical defect. Air Malaysia, not so much because a hijacking means they were asleep at the switch and allowed hijackers to board the plane. Probably by NOT checking their luggage just as thoroughly as they failed to check for stolen passports.
But it's all pure speculation until (if ever) the wreckage is found. The time on the pingers is running out, too. All we've really learned so far is what I mentioned weeks ago - the ocean is just chock full of garbage big enough to be pieces of a downed jet. This really is a technological "fail" as bad as any we've seen in recent years.
--
Bobby G.




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On Tuesday, March 25, 2014 8:36:19 AM UTC-4, Robert Green wrote:

The crazy thing here is that if the ocean is chock full of garbage, they can't even find that. For about a week now it's been a satellite or plane spots some big object, but later when someone finally gets there or the plane returns, they can't find it again. I haven't heard about them finding a single thing in the search area that they thought could have been from the plane, but isn't. It's just that they can't find anything and poor weather isn't helping.
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Which is why I also included evidence. Nothing here until we get the black boxes and/or wreckage except conjecture and enough conflicting testimony to confuse the situation. It probably is in neither Boeing's nor MA's best interests to find anything.
--
Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive,
but what they conceal is vital.
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On Tuesday, March 25, 2014 9:29:45 AM UTC-4, Kurt Ullman wrote:

I would think it's in Boeing's interest to find out what happened. IMO, it's unlikely an aircraft failure, so finding out what happened is likely to vindicate them. But if it is an airplane defect then the same thing could happen to other 777's. One plane they can survive. But if you have a couple more go down, they could have the whole company at risk.
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When I was a kid, me and my friends would put coins on the railway tracks and let the trains run over them. I learned that nickel was much harder than copper.
--
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On 3/26/2014 8:19 PM, nestork wrote:

Now, pennies are zinc. I'm not sure how zinc rates, on hardness. Harder than copper, I'd guess.
--
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Christopher A. Young
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wrote:

Every now and then would find those explosive devices used to strap to the track that when run over would make a super loud bang to alert the engineer to stop the train. Ever find those?
Although handy to walk along the tracks, I quickly learned to walk along the OUTSIDE of the tracks! as in yeccchhh!!!
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On 3/27/2014 10:52 AM, RobertMacy wrote:

I heard, years ago, to always walk along the outside, but can't remember why. Maybe that's it?
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On Thursday, March 27, 2014 8:21:49 AM UTC-4, Stormin Mormon wrote:

zinc is farly hard, melts a way lower temperature and corrodes easily. te copper plating may help money last longer
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RobertMacy wrote:

If you look at the typical power unit (locomotive), theres the long hood where the diesel-electric generator and resistor bank for dynamic braking live, and the short hood in front of the cab. The short hood contains two things; a major connection panel for the control circuitry and the crapper. They may be better now, but the latter used to be a straight drop. It wasn't a real pleasant place to have to work. In fact, being an electrician working on old power units wasn't too pleasant in general. Changing traction motors was a real ball.
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