Flight MH370 disaster - new theory (asphyxia - air problems)

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Given your chop shop scenario, they would not only have to land, but probably do so on less modern landing field. That is orders of magnitude more technical than flying things into a building.

Probably, look at all the tsunami stuff washing up on the west coast. Although it may take awhile and then it has to wash up on an inhabited part of the coast. Who knows.
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wrote:

home

strip/airport

around."

it

stealing

could

That's why I suspect if the place was stolen intact, a state actor was involved. I read after posting that each major part is serialized and selling them off would be pretty risky. I don't see the plane as having landed anywhere but the ocean, but stranger things have happened. New scenario - the Chinese are trying to start WWIII and they'll eventually accuse the US or Korea or Japan of masterminding the disappearance. Stranger things have happened. (-:

of

The tsunami "garbage islands" are quite impressive:
< Cars, tractors, boats and the occasional entire house have been spotted floating on the surface of the Pacific Ocean. The largest "island" of debris stretches 60 nautical miles (69 miles) in length and covers an expanse of more than 2.2 million square feet, according to the US Navy's 7th Fleet, which is closely monitoring the floating rubbish.>
The length of time that's elapsed since the probable ocean crash of the jet means that debris has had a lot of time to scatter as well as become waterlogged and sink. It's conceivable that MH370 stays lost for a very, very long time like the Titanic.
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Bobby G.







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At least with the Titanic, you had a much better fix of where it went down and that was more a question of when the tech would develop to let it happen than IF it would happen.
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jet

very,

It's still a very big ocean out there. It took two years to find just one of the black boxes from the AirFrance crash and they had a pretty good idea where to look because they found wreckage shortly after the crash. MH370 may "sleep" for as long as the Titanic did, albeit for slightly different reasons that all come back to "it's a big ocean with a lot of (very deep) water to search."
The Titanic was only found because the USN floated the money for the search and they were looking for the Thresher, not the Titanic. We've had deep diving submersible technology since the '50's but it's wildly expensive and time-consuming to search at those depths. Maybe if the India sinks a submarine in that area, we'll have an excuse to search the depths in depth. Given the problems India's been having with their subs (they stopped buying Russian gear and are now building their own (apparently very shoddy) subs.
Reminds me of the John Madden joke about the guy who loses a quarter in the urinal so he takes out his wallet and throws a $50 bill in after it. He tells his buddy "you don't think I am going in there for a quarter?"
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Bobby G.




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Everyone is speculating about what happened to that plane, and the longer it's fate remains unknown, the wilder and wilder the speculation becomes.
Now, we're talking about pirates highjacking a plane for ransom just as they would an oil tanker. The problem with that theory is that whomever hijacked the airplane would have to have known enough about it to have turned it's transponders off, and that's not the level of technical sophistication you have amongst typical Somali pirates.
We will eventually find out what happened to that plane, but I suspect the truth will be far more mundane that the speculation, and may even be annoyingly anticlimactic.
One thing's for certain. Whomever took that airplane on a joy ride is almost certain to be given a book and movie deal from some Hollywood producer wanting to cash in on the intrigue.
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nestork

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Looking over all of the published conjecture, etc., I have a question of my own. Has this crossed line between pure fiction writing and fan fiction>?
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wrote:

My opinion is that it's evidence of the human mind needing to have rational explanations for everything that happens. It's why early man created Zeus (to explain thunder and lightning) and probably why we've got civilization. It's insatiable curiosity coupled with a fear of the unknown. We want to make things "knowable" so they don't frighten us.
One thing's for sure. A lot of us know a lot more about airplanes than we did a week ago!
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Which brings to about the only interesting quote from the short-lived 8th Doctor:" "I love humans. Always seeing patterns in things that aren't there."

I don't know. My cynical suggests in the final analysis we may know even less....
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rational

Zeus

civilization.

to

There are some who study intelligence that believe that almost all of our intellect arises from our ability to detect patterns. Some say it was the ability of early humans to read tracks left by animals that catapulted us to the top of the food chain. I personally believe it was figuring out eclipses and the motions of the sun and stars that gave us our edge. Sometimes I wonder if intelligent life will be found only on worlds where there are things like full eclipses.
Speaking of Dr. Who and SciFi I started playing the Bab5 DVDs on the big screen TV instead of the computer monitor and it seems they converted a 4x3 aspect ration to 16x9. The image gets incredibly grainy at times. Also, it's painfully obvious how much special effects have improved in 20 years. The FX really suffer because they are blown up to the wider aspect ratio. However, if they didn't do it during production of the DVDs, I probably would have done it with the remote's zoom button. I hate watching 4x3 programs on the wide screen TV.

we

How did you get a cynical to survive in captivity? I heard they're hard as hell to keep alive. (-:
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The really sad part is that JMS and Netter did all the SFX in the bigger aspect ratio and then WB either lost the files or recorded over them, depending on who you talked to.

And you call yourself a journalist. Cynicism is a job requirement (grin).
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<stuff snipped>

ratio.

Yes, I've been reading about that and noticed, among other things that quite a few issues are in dispute including cast changes/trap doors, plot lines and "who struck John." I'm using the IMDB to figure out "where are they now?" and trying to avoid spoilers. I remember a lot, but not enough to want to know surprises ahead of time. It's engaging. I really like zapping through a dozen or so episodes when I am zapped out. I have to admit to using 2X speed on some stuff. JMS does his share of speechifying. (-:
I always liked the Vorlons. They were a refreshing change from the "always humanoid" aliens of the Star Trek franchise. Of course, the award in the odd-looking aliens category goes to Farscape and Jim Hensons puppets. But I still like the Vorlons the best because their "skin" looked like the burled walnut dash of the Jaguar I restored in college.
Remember when there was the time and energy to look at a beat up old humpty and see in your mind what it would look like after being restored. And then to actually do it? I think I tapped my last can of Bondo a long, long time ago. So long, in fact, it astonishes me. Time sure flies.

(grin).
Ex-journo - the difference is like being an alcoholic and being in recovery.
My neighbor is worried that her five year old grandson is going to be a destructive menace because he takes everything apart. I told her that's actually a good thing if he's trying to see how things work and not just how they break.
A lot of successful people were taking things apart at a very early age. I can't remember the first thing I tried to "fix" when I was a kid. Hmmm. That's the kind of thing that you can't recall on demand but that will show up a day from now when I am looking at something and realize it was a clock or a radio that I did exploratory surgery on.
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Bobby G.



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Here's the latest speculation. Cyber hijackers seized control of the plane remotely.
https://plus.google.com/+ChristianBartosik/posts/SZQGsbvTS5D
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Bobby G.





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A lot of it induced by media types who get bored easily and then go looking for ANYTHING and ANYBODY to fill up air time and put pressure on the officials to do SOMETHING. Two things I learned early on as both a reporter and a psych nurse is (1) you learn a lot by just sitting there quietly until the person (or the situation) has something to say and (2). silence is uncomfortable for us to do so we say something and lose number 1.

I wonder too, if the cockpit reinforcements placed after 9/11 also argue against that happening.
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Kurt Ullman;3211143 Wrote:

Malaysian Airlines will know whether there were any air marshalls aboard that plane. If so, those air marshalls would have been shown how to open the cockpit door in the event someone gets into the cockpit and takes over control of the plane. They would perhaps have keys to unlock the door from the outside in their possession, or know a procedure that would override the door lock.
I also heard on the TV news that the 54 year old captain of that plane had a flight simulator in his house. That flight simulator was confiscated by the Malaysian authorities; ostensibly to see if there's anything incriminating on it.
But, most, if not all pilots love to fly, and for a commercial airline pilot to have a flight simulator in his own house doesn't seem all that strange to me. I would expect to find Golfing game software in the home of an avid golfer and auto racing game software in the home of an auto racing enthusiast.
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I agree.Although, I do know people who don't fly but still use the simulators because they would like. Of course if the simulator has information so he has been practicing how to land a 777 on an abandoned WWII airfield in the Middle East, there might be an issue.
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wrote:

This plane has pretty good short field capability anyway and we have see plenty of accidental landings on fields theoretically too short for the plane. Any halfway decent pilot could set this down on a good sized road if he had to. The trick is finding a route to that road that stays out of range of radar. There may be a corridor in western China or Eastern India that is out of range of radar but I doubt it. That is a politically volatile area. I suppose it might be possible for them to have set up the transponder to emulate some benign flight but I am not sure what that would be. Were they near another flight that they could have "tail gated" into another area?
I am still betting they just flew out to very deep water and went in vertical. A few floaty things may wash up on a beach somewhere but nothing that will help much.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com;3211186 Wrote:

I think you'd have to get an expert's opinion before you could make either of those statements.
Modern radar is sophisticated and might be able to tell the difference between one plane or two located very close together. You'd need an expert, like an air traffic controller, to provide an educated guess here.
If they landed on the water, it's possible the plane would hold together, but a crash into the water would create floating debris. In either case, those US submarine hunting aircraft should be able to find the plane or the debris.
What's the most perplexing aspect of this whole thing is the fact that it appears that the plane's transponders were intentionally turned off, and that leads to all kinds of speculation as to why someone on board would do that. If the pilots were incapacitated, then whoever took over the plane must have had very good knowledge of this kind of aircraft. If the pilots turned the transponders off, what could their motive have been?
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On Sun, 16 Mar 2014 18:18:49 +0100, nestork

CNN has been trotting out all sorts of experts and they seem fairly anonymous that 2 planes close together look like one from fairly far away.

This is a pretty big ocean and they are not even sure where to start looking Seat cushions and bits of foam are not really very big targets

Taking the plane. At that point the only question is whether they really wanted the plane for ransom or further terror acts or if it was just suicide and they wanted it to be hard to find.
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Wrote:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Korean_Air_Lines_Flight_007
<The Soviets challenged many of the facts presented by the U.S., and for the first time, mentioned the presence of a USAF RC-135 surveillance aircraft whose path had crossed that of KAL 007.>
As I recall their flight paths crossed and the Sovs thought the jetliner was a military surveillance jet. The US erased the radar tapes within a day or two, which I find extraordinarily suspicious considering the gravity of the event. "We reused the tape" was the line they used.

If you read the Wiki piece on KAL007, it becomes obvious that debris is often hard to find even if you know exactly where to look. The Soviet SAM appears to have come as close to "completely disintegrating" the 747 as you can come. MH370 could easily be lost forever. Here's what came out of the KAL007 passenger cabin:
<<Of the non-human remains that the Japanese recovered were various items including dentures, newspapers, seats, books, eight KAL paper cups, shoes, sandals, and sneakers, a camera case, a "please fasten seat belt" sign, an oxygen mask, a handbag, a bottle of dish washing fluid, several blouses, an identity card belonging to 25-year-old passenger Mary Jane Hendrie of Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, Canada, and the business card of passenger Kathy Brown-Spier.>>
They found human remains like torsos but those are probably gone after a week in the drink.

And there's always an enormous amount of junk floating in the ocean everywhere. I wonder what the bottom line $ cost will be for this effort and how much US taxpayers will spend. It costs a lot of $ per hour to operate those big Navy ships.

The first one is understandable, at least. Making the plane wreckage hard to find is just being a real dick. For the first time since this happened, I am beginning to think that plane might just pop up somewhere intact.
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Robert Green wrote:

I've heard nothing about China sending it's navy in there to do the job.
Or am I just not tuned into the right station?

For one thing, do we trust all statements made by authorities - like the Malaysian gov't and military?
Was the transponder turned off, or was their a failure to detect it?
What is the range of the transponder?
What other facilities would have been in a position to detect it for the first 40 minutes of the flight?
Did the Malaysians shoot down flight MH370 if they felt (as you would in the USA) that a passenger plane flying without beacon, unresponsive to radio contact, is a defacto threat against the country?
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