Flexy tub leaks at drainpipe, noisy radiator vents

My deadbeat upstairs neighbor has a plastic or fiberglass tub which flexes so that when the user steps on or near the drain, it stresses the joint at the main drainpipe causing a leak. The neighbor obviously doesn't want to remove the tub, and the pipe is accessible through the new hole in my bathroom cieling caused by the leaking, it's only a sheetrock panel in a large floor to cieling closet. My thought was to chop out a section of the copper drainpipe and replace it with hose or something. Is there any other way to get a cheap fix? I don't think there's enough workroom to brace the pipe without removing the tub.
Also, I replaced some vents on my steam radiators, unfortunately the brand I got makes a pinging sound as it operates loud enough to wake me up when the heat comes on at night. A total shot in the dark, but can anybody mention a brand that is quieter?
Thanks for any advice,
Lee
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Lee Hurd wrote:

Yes, rubber "Mission" coupling would be perfect. This is the style with 2 hose clamps, rather than a single large stainless band. You might find them at HD, else a plumbing supply house. Caliper the OD of the pipe first. You may have to caulk the drain fitting where it meets the tub, if that's what is leaking.
Jim
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Thanks, that should calm things down as the owner above is only being a donkey because they have no money to spare.
Lee

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What brand/model did you get?
Part of having a quiet efficient system is making sure that the steam pressure is set low enough. With the typical Pressuretrol, this means setting it as low as it can go, to cut-in at 0.5 psi, and cut-out at 1.5 psi. Many vents are rated for a working pressure of 1.5 psi and/or could be noisier if pressure is higher.
An excellent source of info about steam (and hydronic) heat is "The Wall" forum at http://www.heatinghelp.com/ and other sources there, like Hot Tech Topics. Or if you really want to learn how your system works they have numerous books like "We Got Steam Heat" http://www.heatinghelp.com/shopcart/product.cfm?category=2-109 or "The Lost Art of Steam Heating" http://www.heatinghelp.com/shopcart/product.cfm?category=2-3
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Steam venting is not something you just experiment with. Do you own the building, rent? Different valves vent differently and changing one to a different brand can affect your apt and others. Dole and Gordon are good brands . Dole has an adjustable model. For even bldg heat vents must be balanced, a tedious process of monitoring and replacing and testing.
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The pressure gauge reads 1 psi at the moment while the furnace is idling. From what you describe, it sounds as if the pressure has been too high, so I will see if it goes higher when it's working if that's the right thing to do. The owner's association of the building I rent in just decided to try turning down the heat this winter to save money on oil, so it seems quieter since yesterday. The big problem is that owners are responsible for storm windows and maintaining their radiators, so some don't have storm windows, and many probably have old clogged vents. The property manager put a lock on the heating controlls in the basement so individual residents call the office to get the heat adjusted to their liking, so it's a real mess, and noone's on the same page.
Thanks,
Lee
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