Flat Screen TVs

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I know, not really a home repair question, but I don't know of a better place for this.
Surprise! For Christmas, I now have a beautiful 47" flat screen TV. This is to replace my 10 year old 36" JVC that sat in an attractive, but bulky, Ethan Allen entertainment center with closing doors.
Now, here's the problem. Every entertainment center or TV stand that I can find is just as big as my old Ethan Allen piece! What's the point of a slim TV, if it takes up just as much room as the old big one?
I've seen the automated lift stands, and even though they're still huge, at least they hide the TV away. But shoot, I'm not wanting to spend $2000 on it!
Have any of you guys crossed this hurdle? What solutions did you come up with?
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I hung it on the wall
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I wall mount mine. I have partner that I can wholesale a 110LB mount for about $30 . It solid wd.my 46" plasma.
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G. Morgan wrote:

Have a link to their site?
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Sure...
http://www.monoprice.com/products/subdepartment.asp?c_id 9&cp_id828
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How can you buy a wall-mount without actually seeing how it mounts to the wall and how the tv will mount to the wall mount?
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?

All TV's meet some standard for the mounts. They are interchangeable for any brand.
As for mounting to the wall, I'd want to have big ass screws into a stud. I think they have provisions for that also.
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wrote

No, Ed. I've seen pictures, and heard of people who just slap the mount up there, put four small screws into the drywall, and hang their huge heavy thingus on there. AND, they are so good that they don't even need a level! For a little bit, that is. Finding studs, and using proper anchors is not a given for some DIY installers. Hey, if the nail goes in, or the screw will go into the drywall, that's good enough. For a while, anyway. Or, they have some of the little plastic sleeves left over from picture hanging.............
Steve
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Theoretically, the better drywall anchors are rated for up to 70 pounds per anchor. As it's unlikely you would have a 280 pound TV these days (even with the weight of the mount), that should be sufficient to hold it up with no problem.
I agree with you though - I'd prefer screws into the studs. The location of the TV on the wall may not allow for that though depending on the size of the TV.
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Static weight isn't the problem. The mounted TV becomes a lever, and when a heavy truck drives by, or somebody bumps it, or an earthquake occurs, it will start tugging that pissant drywall anchor right through the wall. It has to be mounted to a couple studs, blocking, or (when all else fails) telephone-company-style to a sheet of 3/4 plywood that is screwed to the studs. It ain't rocket surgery. Only hard part is coming up with something solid that will satisfy SWMBO. Most mounts for the larger TVs that I have hung, were a couple of pipes with sliding wall brackets on them, and a sliding TV bracket that clicked onto them. As long as they crossed 2 stud bays, you could move things around a little and still have a solid mount. Given the cost of the TVs (commercial application), I always did a chin-up on the hanger bar before we hefted the TV up there. If it held me, it'd hold the TV. -- aem sends....
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Wall mounts are designed to mount to the wall either by means of a drywall anchor or screws into the stud. The TVs use standard VESA spacing connectors on the back that mate with the mount.
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?

I built my own. Actually, I built one for my old TV, but I'm still using it for this one. The factory pedestal for the TV is 10" deep, but my stand is 20". It does not look all that bad and I have two drawers on the bottom for storage of CD's and VCR tapes that will probably never be used again. If I was to build another for this TV, I'd probably make it 15 to 18 inches. Having it set back a bit offers a little protection from people walking by.
Consider having one built by a local woodworker hobbyist. It won't be as cheap as some store bough drek, but it will be what you want. My cost for the oak and hardware was more than the cost of a commercial stand, but it is what I want.
Meantime, enjoy the new TV. I do hope you've gotten the HD box and are using it to the fullest potential. I know a few people that are not bothering. Shame.
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On Fri, 24 Dec 2010 01:01:17 -0800 (PST), jwcarlton wrote:

excellent: http://www.coolwoodworkingstuff.com/17.html this company (although they use a different name) sells them on eBay for a little less: http://cgi.ebay.com/WHISPER-RIDE-LIFT-50-PLASMA-LCD-WIRELESS-REMOTE-/220575035438?cmd=ViewItem&pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item335b4bf02e
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......they must have seen you coming
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On Fri, 24 Dec 2010 06:38:01 -0800 (PST), jim wrote:

???????
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jwcarlton wrote the following:

http://www.google.com/images?q=led+tv+wall+mount&oe=utf-8&rls
Bill In Hamptonburgh, NY In the original Orange County. Est. 1683 To email, remove the double zeroes after @
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In most cases the other components of a complete system still need the same amount of depth.
I have not replaced our larger TV because I can not get a large enough screen in the old cabinet and I paid way too much for it to not use it. I would move it to the bedroom but there is no way I can get it up the steps.
Colbyt
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?

Your day of reckoning may come when your present TV finally dies. A fellow at work had a similar situation. One day he borrowed the Sawzall and put the new TV in place.
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Yes, mounting to wall seems best solution any more, but what to do with wiring and additional equipment?
I've seen a kind of enclosure that hides the wire that fastens against the wall, seems simple enough for those that don't want to tear up their walls running wire and cable, or in older houses with plaster/lathe that would be almost unopossible without a lot of work, but they seem only large enough to hold one maybe two wires --- other alternatives?
Where to place cable box or dvr equipment, within wires/cable reach? [without having some kind of stand right there or built into wall]
Again, running wires and cable some where seems inevitable?
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On Fri, 24 Dec 2010 11:33:09 -0600, leonard hofstadter

I use velcro tie wraps. They are reusable. They also work great for cable management inside computers.
In places that won't be seen, I use small screws to screw the tie wraps to the back of the furniture.
http://www.google.com/search?q ble+management
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