Flat roof replaced with pitched


Hi,
I'm going to replace my flat roof with a pitched roof & I'm guessing that like most, want to keep the cost down yet quality high.
I've been searching the web for details but there doesn't appear to be much information available. My initial plan is to rip off the existing tar & gravel, leave the plywood & then work with a framing contractor to place attic trusses. Then get a roofing contractor for final work (underlayerment, flashing, shingles, gutters, etc).
Has anyone done something similar? My concern is the added weight on the existing foundation & structure...
Any thoughts & experiences you can share would be very helpful. Also, I've read several discussions about resurfacing a flat roof with rubber/foam/etc. and I'm not pursuing this route for a number of reasons...so I'd like to just discuss the peaked roof please.
Thanks!
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Your local building inspector can probably tell you if what you are thinking of is feasible. You would need a building permit I assume.
I would skip the framing contractor and just call a couple of roofers for quotes.
If you are going with standard trusses its about a days work to place the trusses and apply sheathing.
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I personally think going that route is a very good idea. As another poster said, the original roof most likely will not have to be removed, and shouldn't be. Trusses would probably be the way to go. The weight should not be an issue. I honestly do not know if a roofer would typically handle that end of the job, but it would cost nothing to ask around. You may end up having to get a different contractor to do the actual construction, but if you can find a roofing contractor that will do the entire job it would probably be better-- if any problems do arise, you will not have 2 outfits blaming each other. Besides the main objective, stopping the leaks, you will have the possibility of gaining some storage space as Hallerb mentioned, a way to run ductwork and wiring if the need arises, but also, if you are anywhere in the South, your cooling bills should drop drastically if the new roof space is properly ventilated. Larry
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On 10 Jan 2007 15:17:35 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

How high a pitch are you planning on going with? The chances are fairly good that the structure doesn't need the weight taken off, since 1 story studwalls are built the same way 2nd and 3rd story studwalls are... the only reason to mess with the old roof at all is to make a way to attach the new roof to the old building.
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Thanks for the thoughts.
I'm not thinking of any extreme roof pitch, just something that fit's in well with the neighborhood.

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A old neighbor did this and went with regular roiof rafters, creating a nice storage loft at little additional expense.........
It was a sales feature when he sold his home years later, he had added a ladder access to his attic:)
today EVERYONE needs more storage space
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