Fixing latex paint mess

A month or so ago, I painted my bathroom with semi-gloss latex paint. On one wall, I noticed some thick, drippy paint after it'd been drying for a while and foolishly tried to wipe it off so I could repaint. I ended up with a lumpy, textured mess. My experience says that trying to sand it down warms the paint and clogs the sandpaper. It seems too big an area to strip with Goof Off or something. I'm looking for advice on smoothing out the messy paint so I can put a fresh, smooth coat on. Any suggestions?
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On Sat, 20 Nov 2010 09:11:44 -0800 (PST), Christopher Nelson

shave off the high spots. They are used by automotive refinishers to remove small runs. Also called a "run razor"
The Veritas Flush Plane from Lee Valley may do the job.
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On Nov 20, 12:43 pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

You don't say how large an area it actually is. But if it's dried for a month, I would think starting with coarse good quality sandpaper and working down would work. What grit are you using?
There are products in the paint stores or HD specifically for removing latex paint and they work very well. You could try it on a test aream but sanding would be my method of choice. The thing I'd be concerned about is those products are made for removing latex paint from cabinets, floor, cars, etc. If you have several coats of paint, or some non-latex underneath, I don't know what it will leave. It might loosen what's underneath and make an even bigger problem unless it all comes off.
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Nice looking tool, similar to my sharp thin putty knife, but with much more control.
Steve
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Get it so there are no raised areas with razor blade, scraper, coarse sandpaper, chisel, whatever it takes. Yea you'll make digs. Mud, prime & paint.
You said "some". Not sure how much "some" we're talking.
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Anyone use a heat gun to soften, then a sharp putty knife blade scraper, but not a razor? I have two one inch wide putty knives that are very old, and are very sharp. I have done some things that amazed me where they have scraped off some things flush that I was fearful of gouging. I turn the angle side down, and try to use the putty knife with the slight bevel flat on the surface to be scraped. Slow and easy and get it sharp and straight.
Steve
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Steve
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On Sat, 20 Nov 2010 09:11:44 -0800 (PST), Christopher Nelson

I've had good luck sanding as much a possible then skim coating with drywall compound, sanding out, spot priming and painting.
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+1...
If you fubar a paint job: sanding it to remove the major bumps and lumps, then using joint compound to smooth and feather the edges and more sanding before priming and repainting is the only real way to fix your boo boo...
~~ Evan
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