Fixing bad mudding job


Let's say someone applies joint compound and really screws it up, grit in the mud, puts it on too thick, amateur mistakes.
Is there a way to correct that without tearing down the entire drywall? Sanding can only do so much, and it won't remove the tape that was applied - so can you use the drywall knife to chip it away or would that be a hopeless effort?
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Eigenvector wrote:

You could use a belt sander that would get all of it off.
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Lawrence wrote:

DO NOT USE A BELT SANDER!
BTDT......I had someone mess up mud job & a kid (22) working w/ me insist he could fix it with a belt sander. I said "ok" but you own it...that is, if you screw it up, you fix it on your own dime.
It took him a lot of time to repair the damage he did with that belt sander :)
He gouged the drywall, through the paper...it was a mess! Luckily it was is a shop environment. By the time he fixed it, it looked ok
but now the joke is:
"We can fix that.......get out the belt sander!"
Sand a little as possible to remove the imperfections, feather it in with new mud & a big knife.
cheers Bob
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BobK207 wrote:

I cleaned seams in a shop once with a belt sander , but we taped some aluminum flashing on each side of the joint. When the sander hit the flashing it was done.
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If he used the same method he observed the pros using, sounds like he's gonna need a slicker instead of a big knife..
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You should only need to take it down so far to re-feather it out properly. Once you get through the paint (if present) it should just be a matter of wet sponging it down to the level you need.
--
Steve Barker


"Eigenvector" <m44 snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com> wrote in message
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Not as easy as it looks even when you watch someone else do it, eh?
Hopefully "someone" didn't use Durabond. If it's really bad a Surform might work followed by some wet sanding if you can't do it with a pole sander and sanding screen. Depends on how long you want to spend on a garage wall. If not, looks like your previous post about using nails might have paid off...
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I'm sure your attempt at humor is in good fun.
Actually I haven't started on the garage yet, I don't have the spare $200 it will cost me.
This is to correct the basement, my first drywalling job ever. As for that trick I learned from the professional drywaller - it really works.
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Use a damp sponge to soften the mud and wipe off. Make sure it is right before painting.

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I know others have made suggestions, here are some.
Take a big wet rag, go over the area, and then remove a portion with a Scotch-Brite pad. When you get down to dry mud, get it wet and repeat the process.
Best to wear gloves so that the alkalinity of the mud won't dry your skin.
Those are suggestions from my wife, who also installed our kitchen floor tiles.
Eigenvector wrote:

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