fix one broken spanish roof tile


1930s spanish roof tiles, one broken from a tree branch or something, letting in a littl rain.
Me, not entirely a newbie home repair guy, but close.
Is there some halfway reasonable way to stick this back in place, or if not, what are the odds that even a roofing pro would be able to do much better?
I took a tour of the local Home Depot looking for some kind of adhesive mortar, they had what I think was a 25lb box that I don't see online, but it was something like this quickcrete:
http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1vZ1xhc/R-100318504/h_d2/ProductDisplay?langId=-1&storeId051&catalogId053
Would something like that be appropriate? And is applying something like that really so nasty (reading the instructions) that gloves should be worn, eye protection, and sacrificial work clothes? I just need a quart or so of the stuff, after all.
Or would some kind of exterior calking both stick the tile back together and hold it in place in a workable fashion for the next, oh, ten years or so? Assuming nobody is walking on it, and I don't let the tree branches grow back there either?
Thanks for any and all advice.
J.
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JRStern wrote:

True Spanish tile? Clay with a "U" shaped one and two upside down "U"s with the legs in the first?
Surely, even in the 30s, they used a membrane under the tiles (don't know, asking)? If so and you are getting a leak, the membrane needs to be repaired.
After repairing the membrane or if there is none (I have seen such) I'd remove the broken tile and replace it with a new one.
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wrote:

I guess it's "true", and I think your description sounds like the structure, and yes there's heavy tar paper underneath, but if that broken tile has shifted again and some water got in, it may have flowed who knows where before finding a hole in the tar paper, etc.
I'm sure replacing the tile in good order is best advice. I do notice there are gobs of mortar sticking together other tiles, in a not entirely clear pattern. Again, I presume it follows whatever was common practice back then for a medium-sized Cecil Adams (architect, Santa Monica and Long Beach, CA c. 1930) house.
But I'm still looking for a solution somewhere north of duct tape and south of tearing up and rebuilding a whole section of roof and trying to find matching replacement tiles.
Thanks.
J.
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JRStern wrote: ...

...
What's the definition of "broken"? Shards or simply a crack?
Generally, if it's just cracked into two or three large pieces one can manage to patch back together as sounds like has been done elsewhere.
I've used some of the hydraulic setting cements (very fine powder, no grit so makes a nice paste) or, in a pinch, even construction adhesive.
Guessing in S CA somewhere, there likely is a roofer who specializes in these that may have some suggestions for more permanent fixes.
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Not sure what your spanish roof tiles are exactly, but I would think that "regular" terracotta type fired clay roof tiles should be available in a matching color. If the system is similar to the Dutch system of 50 years ago, they are simply placed on slats nailed to the roof. Nowadays, with tarpaper or something akin between roof and tiles, and with /breathing/ventilated insulation below the wood part of the roof.
Good luck!
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Best regards
Han
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Just two pieces.

Good, I'm going up to take another look, but maybe it's really that simple. Thanks.

Sure, if I can't fix it for under $20, but even then it's best if I understand what some simple options might be, before talking to a pro.
J.
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