Fix Bumpy Paint On Door

Hi All,
I painted a door with semigloss paint after stripping and sanding both sides smooth, then priming. One newly painted side looks good and smooth, but the other side looks really bumpy. I used the same painting technique for both sides - rolling the paint on and quickly laying it down with a high quality brush.
I am trying to avoid restripping the bad side or spending a lot of time sanding the paint down. Is there some way to fill in the "valleys" without going to a lot of trouble?
Any advice appreciated!
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hard wooden block, not a soft pad. wrap with 300 to 400 'wet n dry' sandpaper use window cleaner as slurry mix gently sand flat, to mirror surface if you like, easy to do, one sheet does the whole door. this is important...clean well. use tac cloth wipe, then paint again. flow on the paint.
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On Thursday, May 1, 2014 5:55:14 PM UTC-5, James wrote:

oth, but the other side looks really bumpy. I used the same painting techni que for both sides - rolling the paint on and quickly laying it down with a high quality brush. I am trying to avoid restripping the bad side or spend ing a lot of time sanding the paint down. Is there some way to fill in the "valleys" without going to a lot of trouble? Any advice appreciated!
Get a textured paint and repaint the one side with that.
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If it's oil paint you can sand it down, especially while it's still fresh. If it's acrylic/latex that won't work so well. It tends to scratch rather than wear, like sanding rubber. If it were me I'd live with it, but given that you already stripped the old paint (!) it sounds like this is a special door.
If you want a really nice finish next time, prime with oil underbody primer and paint with oil or acrylic alkyd paint. Another trick is to not use semi-gloss. The less the gloss, the more forgiving of imperfections.
| | I painted a door with semigloss paint after stripping and sanding both sides | smooth, then priming. One newly painted side looks good and smooth, but the | other side looks really bumpy. I used the same painting technique for both | sides - rolling the paint on and quickly laying it down with a high quality | brush. | | I am trying to avoid restripping the bad side or spending a lot of time | sanding the paint down. Is there some way to fill in the "valleys" without | going to a lot of trouble? | | Any advice appreciated! |
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On 5/1/2014 6:55 PM, James wrote:

Latex or alkyd? Makes a big difference, because latex is about impossible to sand. Painted in cold weather, or in hot sun? Without more info (paint, time since it was done, etc), I'd be inclined to strip it if you used latex. If alkyd, give it time to CURE (not just dry), per label, sand lightly and put on another coat. Thin paint a tad, have door lying flat.
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