Fishing 240v Wire

I need to fish some 240v wiring as follows: From the breaker panel into an existing 3/4 inch conduit that goes vertical umtil it hits the ground. Once in the ground it nakes several 90 degree turns until it comes back out of the ground about 25 feet away. A great portion of the underground run is in conduit that is under concrete. There are wires in the conduit now but they are the wrong guage for what I am trying to do. What is the easiest way to remove the old wiring and then run new wiring without tearing everything up?
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The Midnight Gardener wrote:

...
Left out most important part besides what others already said -- what size/number of existing and proposed wires? What type of conduit?
You'll undoubtedly need to lube the new when pulling it, too. How easy it will be to pull the old will be very much dependent on what is there and how the run actually goes and what condition it is in underground. A lot there will depend on how long it's been in place.
--
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On Apr 1, 10:44 am, The Midnight Gardener <The Midnight Gardener> wrote:

It's gonna depend a lot on whether they used sweeps or nineties.
Steve
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On Tue, 01 Apr 2008 07:44:53 -0700, The Midnight Gardener <The Midnight Gardener> wrote:

Pulling the wires out one at a time will probably be hard to do.
The most practical way would be to pull out the old wire with a string attached to the wire. Use the string to pull in a pull rope that would be reusable.
Pulling out the old wire will give you a chance to measure the length for the new wire.
Don't forget to use wire soap. It really helps one person is pushing on the wire while the other is pulling. 1,2,3 pull 1,2,3 pull
There is a limit to how many wires you can put in a 3/4 pipe. I am guessing that because the existing pipe is in concrete you may find out what that limit is. :)
I am not sure what the record is. Let us know.
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wrote:

If you have to pull out the old wire, and you do, wouldn't it be a good idea to solder the new wires to the old wire?
That way you wouldn't have to worry abou tthe pull string breaking, or coming loose from the wire.
Or you could do both if you wanted. Solder the wires and also pull the pull string through. I assume the string (nylon?) won't be very thick and will go through easily. If the wires go through on the first time, you can leave the string in place in case you need to add an additional wire later.

He should be able to estimate pretty well, and how hard is it to have 10 or 20 feet extra just in case.
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he will have to be certain the old conduit is large enough for the new larger wiring gauge......
since theres no reason to thiner wiring.....
even worse if he needs to add another conductor, like a real neutral plus ground..........
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What is a "single strand" wire? You mean solid wire, or stranded wire?
Single strand would seem to mean solid.
I have always found stranded wire easy to pull, but impossible to push. You?
JK
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Thanks for ll of the good advice everyone. This is going to be one of my honetdews in the coming weeks. The wires are for a spa that someone gave my wife. I wish the thing would just go away!
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