First welder- casual use

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yet@none_chosen.com (not-registered-yet@none_chosen.com) says...

The difference is that you can choose which direction the electrons flow. If they flow from your electrode to the work, they heat the work more. If they flow from the work to the stick, they heat the stick more. For heavy work, a DC welder gives better penetration. For light work, reverse the polarity and it's less likely to burn through. Other than that, it's pretty much the same game.
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says...

This is the stuff I like to see posted.Thank you.
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Jim Yanik
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On Wed, 2 Jan 2008 07:35:52 -0800, Larry Caldwell

So what you're saying is that the person changes the polarity to achieve the desired result, correct? I am going to assume that positive on the welding rod and negative on the steel being welded would be the setting used for deeper penetration, and if reversed, it would be for avoiding burn thru. Is this correct, or is it the opposite of that?
Thanks for the advice. I now understand the use of a DC welder. Now I wish I had one to give it a try....
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not-registered-yet@none_chosen.com wrote in says...

I would think it's the opposite;negative rod for deeper penetration of weld.(neg to pos electron flow.) The E-beam from the rod strikes the workpiece and delivers it's energy to the piece.

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Jim Yanik
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check out http://www.welding.com/welding_terms.shtml look under the letter 'D'.
also see:
http://books.google.com/books?id=EOiY7oHWXUUC&pg=PA91&lpg=PA91&dq +welding+polarity&source=web&ots=DggISGrFPG&sig=K5oAO9cpb06NkHzONFeM5q8buZY
http://www.hobartwelders.com/weldtalk/showthread.php?t'151
not much use for electrode negative. Electrode positive is the normal way, and is called DC reverse polarity.
steve

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There are lots of uses for electrode negative. Choose any welding book. Read all about it.
Steve
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i've read 'em and i've lived it. Never used it, never seen anyone use it. Even the books say there's not much use for it.
s

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If you say it, then it must be so.
Steve
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that's a fact jack. <G>
s

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not-registered-yet@none_chosen.com wrote:
-snip-

Good idea-- I've got a good Hitachi, but I'm always losing the arbor nut when I have a wire brush on for a few days.
I'll pick up a cheapy to hold those wire wheels. -snip-

Gotta admit I've never cut with mine-
-snip-

Thanks for the link, too-
Jim
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Go to www.millerwelds/resources/ improving-your-skills and check out all the great articles and help tips. Then sign up for their newsletter which is well worth the time it takes to read all the info that shows up there. And if you must buy HF things, get their better angle grinder and wire brushes, you'll need them. HTH
Joe
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Joe wrote:

Just a slight correction, Joe : http://www.millerwelds.com/resources/
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Dave
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Just an aside ..... if you got rust, paint, oil, dirt, or wind, you're going to have a spongy looking weld. As said, the electric brush is the thing. But beware. An electric wire brush is about the nastiest thing next to a pit bull I've ever seen. It's easy to get violent kicks if you put it in the work the wrong way. They are unforgiving. And wear a face shield. I have pulled more than one of those wires out of my body in various places. I don't know what 14,000 rpm converts to in mph, but I'd say about 1/4" of penetration. With wirefeed, metal prep is key.
Steve
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i have a lincoln ac/dc buzzbox stick welder.. and reccomend it. . when you buy it, youll get an offer on the lincoln welding book,get it. i saw the lincoln ac dc stick welder at home depot and lows the other day .it has a 3 year warranty . i like it because it does pretty thin metal and is powerfull enough for the heavy thickness metal stock. have welded thru paint and dirt in a pinch.when you strike your arc, strike it like a match.. lucas
http://www.minibite.com/america/malone.htm
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