first tools

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Mac did have a swiss Army knife. Which is a bit odd, as he seemed to have contempt for military, guns, and weapons.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .

Come on - MacGyver did not have a hammer!
;->
--
Tim Watts Personal Blog: http://www.dionic.net/tim /

"She got her looks from her father. He's a plastic surgeon."
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U forgot the vice grips!!!
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On Mon, 10 Dec 2012 06:20:54 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (Herb Eneva) wrote:

You already got many suggestions, my comment is more about quality. Not every tool has to be the top of the line, but avoid junk.
A poorly made screwdriver will make a simple job more difficult and even more costly if it damages the fasteners. For only a few more dollars, get one with a good comfortable grip.
Pliers and wrenches should have good jaws.
What to buy depends on your needs. Home repair is a bit different that auto tinkering, but screwdrivers are needed fro both. Hammer styles will differ, but again, get a decent one with a comfy grip.
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Good advice. Don't buy junk tools.
I always buy tools as I need them. No point in buying a hand saw when you need to drive screws.
--
Dan Espen

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On 12-10-2012 18:17, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Compare a crappy screwdriver with a good one by actual use, and you'll know the difference, even if you can't see the diff before you use it.
On the other hand, even a crappy screwdriver won't damage the screw if you know what you're doing.
--
Wes Groleau

Liar, Liar, Pants on Fire!
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Not sure which of the "four way things" you are speaking of.
I don't where I got this, but it ended up in my toolbox a while back and I love it.
http://toolmonger.com/2007/11/19/dealmonger-free-kobalt-6-in-1-screwdriver /
I know I didn't get it through the Lowes deal, but I did get it for free...I just don't know how.
I'm usually against combination tools that claim to take the place of multiple tools but usually don't take the place of even one decent one, but this Kobalt 6 in 1 screwdriver works very well. I don't use the nut driver part for anything heavy, but the screwdrivers get a lot of use for quicky fixes around the house and cars. It's nice to have 4 screwdrivers handy in one easy to change tool.
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I worked for a large company as an electrician with about 20 others. We all carried a tool similar to that one. Saved carring around a bunch of other tools. While not the best for some things, they worked well for the electrical connections. The tools were bought by the company and they would buy us almost anything we asked for. So it was not a mater of getting out cheap. If we did break one, that was no big deal as the company would get us a new one. They usually had a replacement in the tool room.
If I really needed a good screwdriver, it was back to my main tool box in the shop to get one, or carry a good one if I knew I was going to need one.
Also nothing like carring a big screwdriver that I used for everything but driving screws. Makes a dandy prybar and other abused usages.
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In article

In my experience... the more 'things' something does, the less 'things' it does well.
Same holds true for many people.
Erik
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That's typically my opinion of most x-in-one tools. However, the Kobalt screwdriver works, mainly because the changeable bits are of good quality and the holding mechanism for both the bits and the shaft is well built.
BTW...the model I have no longer seems to be available (I was in Lowes last night). I can't speak for the newer models.
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On 12/12/2012 3:39 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Since I screw a lot for a living, I must have a high quality tool for the job. (lots of puns) The best multi bit screwdrivers I've ever come across are manufactured in The U.S.A. by Megapro. Their tools are solid and the guts don't break like the cheap Asian multi bit screwdrivers. I've been carrying their Megalok model in my pocket for more than 5 years and I use it daily. I broke one bit through misuse and was able to purchase a replacement bit at WW Grainger where I purchased the tool. It is what I consider a lifetime tool because it lasts and the bits can be bought at any industrial supplier which stocks their line. It's not like the cheap multi bit drivers that you can't get replacement bits for which is why I like it so much. The best thing about the Megalok is the fact that it can be carried in your pants pocket without snagging or tearing a hole in your pocket. ^_^
http://www.megapro.net/products/drivers /
http://www.megapro.net/products/specialty-drivers/megalok /
TDD
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-snip-

-snip-
That looks like the screwdriver that was part of my kit that I got when I joined the telephone company in 1972. The handle on mine is red. It is still in use in the 'grab bucket- though I managed to lose the smaller bit somehow.
That, and a set of needlenose pliers in your pocket- and up the pole you'd go. . . .
Jim
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snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (Herb Eneva) wrote:

Hmmm... why don't you first order yourself a copy of a good home repair book, and count it as tool one. This one is great and has been around for eons, but there are others as well.
<(Amazon.com product link shortened) 5798/ref=sr_1_4?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid55183219&sr=1-4&keywords=home+repai r>
(Sorry about the long link... if necessary, copy/paste to fix...)
This book will become an old friend... and has whole section devoted to tools and the like.
Good Luck!
Erik
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A book in the age of the Internet?
How quaint.
--
Dan Espen

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On 12/10/2012 3:20 AM, Herb Eneva wrote:

They'll be happy to show you their stuff. Now, you know what you can borrow.
Go buy the second-cheapest Chinese combo screwdriver/wrench/socket set you can find at the after Xmas closeout. Take the neighbor with the best tools on that shopping trip. From then on, as you learn what you'll need, buy QUALITY tools. You can always fall back on that cheapo stuff.
Nobody can tell you exactly what you need. A car-guy will need different stuff from a house builder. Don't be in a hurry. Before you know it, you'll have a garage full of tools, then a shed full of tools then a second shed full of tools. And, even though you have ten sets of socket wrenches, you'll always be missing the size you need. ;-)
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A few years back I broke all my tools down into 5 groups. Plumbing Electrical Carpentry Mechanical General There are some things that overlap such as screwdrivers and basic pliers But over time I got into more specialized versions for each category e.g Electrical screwdrivers and pliers have insulated grips Mechanical screwdrivers have hardened tips etc. I also color-coded the tools by dipping the handles into colored rubber coating
Has made keeping track of them far easier. Particularly when SWMBO dips into one tool box and then just puts the tool back on the bench (If that).
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Attila Iskander wrote:

Yes. I did that when I started my house renovation. Bought several toolboxed on discount that happened to be stackable and strong and have:
Plumbing Electrical Screwdrivers (etc) Fixings (lots of screws)
The electrical one contains a second set of screwdrivers that are insulated along with wirestripers, sidecutter, professional grade crimp tool (insulated and uninsulated type) and various bits that go with my Megger electrical tester.
I try to get everything back in the right box at the end of a job. Certainly cuts down on tool-losing!
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Tim Watts Personal Blog: http://www.dionic.net/tim /

"She got her looks from her father. He's a plastic surgeon."
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I have since started putting electrical hand tools in their own tool boxes, with the appropriate "stuff" that should go with it e.g. Palm sander -> sand paper Router -> router bits
Many of these tools were obtained with huge discounts or even free with rebates Also, by letting the least used boxes got to the bottom of the stack, I have a pretty clear idea of which tools are proving redundant.
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Herb Evena, or someone who calls themself Herb Evena asked...

Before that question can be answered, I think we need to know what will the adult in question will need the tools for. For general home repairs, one set of tools will work but for someone with a desire to try woodworking, a different set of four would be required.
I probably don't need a pair of pliers to build a book case, and I probably don't need a circular saw to change an outlet.
Another question: what is your definition of a "tool" in this instance? Is a single handle with multiple inserts one tool or more? Is a 18v kit with a circular saw, drill, reciprocating saw and flashlight a single tool or does that fill the full quota of 4?
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snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (Herb Eneva) wrote:

I hope you find your way back to this thread as it really is a perennial question and only you [or the recipient] can determine what the best 4 are.
When my daughter got her first apartment I made her a kit with a claw hammer, a good set of screwdrivers, some duct tape, an adjustable wrench and a pair of Vice Grips. When I got her the nice pink tool belt, I saw it had a space for a tape measure & I filled that, too.
When [if?<g>] my son leaves, he'll get some mechanics tools- and a set of tiny screwdrivers to tear electronics apart.
If this is for you-- Buy the minimum, but buy good quality. As a job comes up, buy a decent tool to make the job easier. I'm past 60 and the addage 'Any job worth doing is worth buying a tool for.' is just starting to be useless. [maybe I just do a lot fewer jobs these days-- but I don't have a lot of really new toys<g>]
Jim
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A lot depends on what kind of house, and what kind of repairs. Or, if said adult is going to repair small engines, vehicles, etc.
As to my own usage,
10 way screw driver crescent wrench (doubles as light hammer) Wire stripper / pliers combo VOM / ammeter
Drill Dremel angle grinder sawzall
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
For someone just starting out in adult life what would be the best four hand and power tools?
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