Firewood Sawhorse Cutting Designs

I recently got into cutting wood for my cabin. We went and picked up some lengths of wood, and cut them.
I had a couple of old sawhorses that I used at first, putting the wood across the top at a ninety degree angle. But, I had to keep moving the horses with length, and the smaller lengths were hard to control.
So, I added some "X" pieces for the long pieces of wood to rest in. I advanced them as I cut off each piece.
Does anyone know of sites that have information or designs for these "sawhorses" or whatever they are called? I need to make one or three for the coming season, and I sure need something better than what I scabbed together.
Thanks.
Steve
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"Sawbuck" IIRC.
HTH GT
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"Ranieri" <nah> wrote in message

Nice tool. I just put another cut of the log under the remaining length and move it up along as I go. I also cut on the spot where I find the tree (versus bringing it somewhere else to cut). It is easier for me to load up 16 inch lengths into my trailer than long logs. Tomes
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Make up three 'Xs' from six scrap 2x4 etc. each piece about four feet (not critical) and brace them together with scrap lengths of board. Slightly diagonally! The middle X is placed off centre nearer to one side. Longer wood placed across is cut off beyond and between the two X closest together and after two/three cuts can be moved along, if necessary, and/or other cuts can be made in the longer length. Gee this takes longer to describe than making it ....! Another advantage of open construction is that one can stand midpoint inside the three X structure, and lift it around you and walk to anew location. (I'm age 72 by the way). Can take quite heavy logs and or bunches of scrappy wood which can be cut as bundle. Cut pieces fall down around 'legs' of the 'saw-horse'. Good idea to place the braces not too high and where they are least likely to get cut by the saw.
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You already lifted the firewood ONCE to put it into your truck, then threw it on the ground. Now you want to pick it up AGAIN and throw it back on the ground?
Forget the sawhorses. Why not do this:
1. Cut logs to 8' lengths to fill the pickup bed neatly and densely. 2. When unloading, have a helper (or yourself) drag the logs out of the bed 2 feet at a time to lopp them off to woodstove length with the chainsaw. 3. When they get too short to cut safely on the tailgate, drop them to the ground or on top of some other logs and make the last cut there. 5. Repeat steps 2 and 3 until the truck is empty.
Then you only have to lift the logs twice instead of thrice (or more) before they go up in smoke.
Since you're still getting the same amount of firewood no matter how many times you lift those logs and set them down, it's to your advantage to minimize the lifting.
Sometimes (like when I have to do a lot of splitting), it becomes a toss-up as to whether it's worth it.
Especially when I splinter the handle of the maul. 8-|
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