Firewood cover

What are you folks covering your woodpiles with? I'm so tired of re-tying tarps and replacing tarps every couple of years has gotten old. I've read that a rigid roof keeps the pile better aerated on top whereas the tarp is laying on and draping over the wood. Well, I can only imagine sheets of metal roof taking flight during a winter wind storm peaking at 50+ mph! I'm thinking that there's really no better way but I thought I'd ask.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Nothing. My wood is under the deck and it gets enough protection that way. I don't worry about rain, just snow as that can be a PITA
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If you are burning serious amounts of wood, take the time to build a shelter. It only needs to have a roof, sides are needed. It doesn't take much time and the expense is not that bad (saves you buying tarps)
I don't cover mine at all except for the first 5 cords (woodshed and porch) each season. After that they come off the outside piles where only the top layer has any significant moisture.
Harry K
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If you are burning serious amounts of wood, take the time to build a shelter. It only needs to have a roof, sides are needed. It doesn't take much time and the expense is not that bad (saves you buying tarps)
I don't cover mine at all except for the first 5 cords (woodshed and porch) each season. After that they come off the outside piles where only the top layer has any significant moisture.
Harry K
YEa, I guess you're right, Harry. I should just sink six or eight posts along the 28' length of the back of the garage, tie them together and do a metal roof. I already have 4" of 1" stone on the ground for drainage and that's covered with landscaping cloth to keep the wood debris from filling the voids in the stone bed. I run two rows of wood ranked and the ends cribbed up. AEmeijers has a good, 3-sided wood shed idea but this area is already under a tree and the sun doesn't touch much of the pile so drying is very slow. I feel that I need the air circulation to make up for the lack of radiant drying. Interesting tarp, SteveB. I don't believe I've ever seen that. and your're right. Sky Mall is for suburbanites who buy but don't invent. Did I say upper class suburbanites. Thanks, folks. Except you Ed. Wise acre - LOL!!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Don't worry about the sun not hitting the pile. It has almost zero effect on drying time. At most it would help the outside pieces dry. Air circulation is what does the job.
My "woodshed" is small, only aobut 2 1/2 cord with solid walls on three sides. Were I to do it over it would have no walls.
Harry K
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You're welcome, of course. I do know what has worked for me for 25+ years. Simple is good.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote in message

that I'm simple - :-O
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
C & E wrote:

If you are really into woodburning, build a long skinny 3-sided shed to keep the wood in. Think like a trashcan holder, only real long. More like an above-ground baseball dugout. Treated wood stringers up off the ground so bottom of pile stays dry, and a sloped roof with a decent overhang. I'd make it tall enough so you don't bang your face on the edge of the roof. Face the open side away from the direction driving rain usually comes from. With open bottom and long side to let air through, the roof should stay on with no problem, and it will keep the wood dry enough. Farmers have been using sheds like this for round hay bales and tractors for years.
-- aem sends...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I saw this in Sky Mall while flying to Hawaii. Imagine a rectangle about ten feet wide by two feet deep with the corners cut out. The sides drape down on all four sides for about two feet. It looks like the top of a shoe box, but with longer sides. This fits over the four corners of a rectangular log rack of the same size, the holes going over the four posts. Gravity or a couple of bungees or some more wood keeps it on. It travels down as wood is pulled out from under it. The flaps around the edges keep the wood inside dry.
I have a canvas sewing machine, and will be making one very soon. I can make one cheaper than they sell them.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I've seen some folks throw a tarp. Then reach under the tarp, and pull out several piece of wood. The several pieces are thrown on top of the tarp. The weight helps keep the tarp down.
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

**many**pieces of wood on top of the pile. The tarp would be in the trees if I hadn't tied through the corner grommets and tied around some nails at the bottom of the pile. The principal is sound but we have this happen 2-3 times per winter and also multiple lower force winds.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I just buy the wood pile tarps from Mernards when they put them on sale. I cover the pile and then throw a couple of pieces of wood on top. Never had a problem and they last for 3-4 years b/4 they need to be replaced. Cheaper and easier than building a cover for the wood pile and it's adjustable.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
C & E wrote:

I'm using a 48 foot tractor trailer that you can pick up for 1000 or 2000. Keeps it dry and holds plenty along with garden tractors and motorcycles. You can build a ramp for it or remove the wheels and put it on a slab. I think it's the most bang for the buck if you've priced out buildings at retail outlets.
--
<<//--------------------\>>
Van Chocstraw
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

A tarp is the most common method, and probably the least expensive. Keep the wood up off the ground.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 06 Mar 2009 07:49:45 -0500, Phisherman wrote:

My rack was made of 4x4's approximately 16ft long, 4ft wide and 4ft high. Above that is an open A-frame. Tarps go over and wrap underneath. Then are held in place by connecting bungee cords. Tension they provide keeps everything in place.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.