Fireplace screen lubrication


I have a metal link screen suspended by metal rings from a steel rod right in the front of my fireplace opening. Over the years, it has become harder and harder to open and close the screen, although I can't see any rust. If this wasn't a working fireplace, I would just lubricate it, but most of the lubricants I have are shown as very flammable on the label. The only exception is some ancient high temperature grease that is so old there are no warnings on the label, not even about causing cancer in California.
Should is risk it? It wouldn't actually be in contact with the flames, but about a foot away. Or is there some other lubricant that would be better suited? Hate to burn down my house experimenting.
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Try a graphite based product. I don't think they are flammable and probably won't dry out as fast in the heat.

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Powdered graphite might do the trick.
Kano labs had some high temperature spray, but it's been ages since I've seen that. You could sand the rod with emery cloth, or steel wool. Might help.
Please let us know what turns out to work. My parents have a fireplace screen. Same deal. Gets hard to open or close.
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On Dec 21, 5:47 pm, "Stormin Mormon"

Spray it on when there is no fire in the fireplace, move the wire screen back and forth several times, wait 24 hours before lighting the fireplace. The flamability is most likely the propellant for the spray so once it evaporates, you should be aok.
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wrote:

Suggestion. Heat rusted rings hanging the metal mesh curtain? Try replacing rings with, say, some stainless ones?
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Which "it" do you reccomend? Silicone? WD?
Like you say, spray it between fires. My thought is that the .000001 ounces of liquid you would spray on, won't hurt anything. 24 hours is perhaps over cautious.
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Thanks for the input. I put some powdered graphite on and it worked quite well.
Stormin Mormon wrote:

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I'm so pleased that worked. Will have to remember that for future moments. Thank you for sharing what worked. Others, readers and lurkers, may have benefitted.
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In typed:

Escept there's no description of the original problem, it might. There's no hint at what the OP may have asked about.

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Not@home wrote:

Try a few drops of motor oil. The temperature inside your engine's cylinder has got to be hotter than a fireplace.
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10w30, straight weight non detergent, synthetic?
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ransley wrote:

I'd mix half-and-half 10w30 and 10w40 to get 10w35. Should be about right.
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That: > 10w30, straight weight non detergent, synthetic? ought to be on the Ransley hall of fame.
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On Dec 22, 4:26 pm, "Stormin Mormon"

Only you could miss the joke.
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Pay a visit to Manny, Moe, and Jack. (Pep Boys, or similar). Buy a tube of silicone spark plug boot release. Lube critical parts. Problem solved. No hazardous sprays, no waiting for cure, low cost. After all, if it works on the center spark plugs of your 350 Chevy, it will easily shrug off the more modest fireplace heat.
Joe
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Not@home wrote:

This is what I use for a lot of things where I want the lube to stick around in extreme conditions. I've been using it on all sorts of things and found that those items don't need as much attention anymore. It's rated for 300°F minimum. The national chain auto parts stores carry it.
http://tinyurl.com/ydde4l8
TDD
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