Fire Extinguishers - when need to replace?

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I'd go in, if I was fairly sure the fire was small at that moment, and could be extinguished. Guess I'm a moronic ass, too.
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
On 9/17/2013 2:56 PM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

a fire extinguisher is typically used to put out a small fire, like a

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On Tuesday, September 17, 2013 2:56:13 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

Strawman detected. Strawman rejected. I never said anything about entering a burning building, neither did anyone else.
You made the remarkable claim:
"OTOH, a FE likely to be seen in a home has one purpose in life; to get your ass out."
Well, how dumb is that? I would bet that in 99%+ of the times a fire extinguisher is used, it's not being used so that you can get out of a burning house. If the house is so compromised by fire that you can't just exit through a window, door, etc, how the hell are you supposed to get to, find, and then use a fire extinguisher to make your exit? And at that point, what difference is a small home fire extinguisher likely to make? Usually you're most immediately endangered and incapacitated by the smoke, the fire itself is often in another part of the house. And God knows where the fire extinguisher is, unless you keep one in each room.
On the other hand, home fire extinguishers are used every day by homeowners to put out small fires, before they spread and burn down the house. According to you, if the top of the stove or oven or a trash can catches fire, you're supposed to take the fire extinguisher and do what? Carry it out with you as you head to the door? You can do that. The rest of us would use the fire extinguisher to put out the small fire.
And as usual, the pointless name calling when you're on the losing end of an argument is noted.
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Now, seriously. What use would Usenet be, if we all made sense, and treated each other politely?
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
On 9/18/2013 9:18 AM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

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Go bah anutter wun. And not behan th fahr!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=noAHa0LfNcY

. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
On 9/17/2013 8:13 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

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On Sun, 15 Sep 2013 17:05:15 -0700 (PDT), Higgs Boson

Didn't he miss the point here, guys? I suppose it's hard to tell without being inside, but one isn't supposeed to have to shake so hard he loosens caked powder. If the powder is caked when you start shaking it, it will be caked again within a month, I presume is what was meant.

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micky wrote:

Another thing to keep in mind is todays' newly built houses burn 8 times faster than older houses which were built with more natural materials. They are talking about changing the code so even private residential single houses built with sprinklers.
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Yes, I've heard that from a couple sources. Youtube has some videos about "light weight construction". The homes of now days are loaded with plastic and truss frame construction. They go fast, hot, and collapse earlier than the homes of years gone by.
The home owner or passerby on the spot int he first minutes with a FE can be the difference between a mess and a total loss.
The fire department women and men are world's finest people, and they are also often several minutes away, in the days of staff shortages, volunteer departments, and congested roads.
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
On 9/15/2013 11:12 PM, Tony Hwang wrote:

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Here is one such light weight construction home.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JKYW6uK4vDI
Unsure how the fire started, here.
Another video, a homeowner had a fire pit on the back deck, and left the hot coals.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QuA-yZsmTkk

. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
On 9/16/2013 5:21 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

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I don't have any data, but the FE guys I talk with seem to think that it takes many months, or years for the powder to cake.
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
On 9/15/2013 9:43 PM, micky wrote:

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On 09/16/2013 05:12 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

That is what I've heard as well. Shouldn't be an issue with commerical extinguishers which are never left hanging in the same place longer than 6 years but if you e.g. use old commercial ones as "better than nothing" in your house it might be a concern.
nate
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replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply.
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As for me, if I ever use a dry chem FE, I plan to invert and shake the unit before approaching the fire. It only takes a second, and may make the difference between put out the fire, or vent the propellant.
I should mention calling the fire department, or 911 to report the fire before getting involved with fire extinguishers. They never object to being called in case of something really on fire. If they show up and find a citizen with a fire extinguisher starting on the job, that's OK also. Or if the concerned citizen puts the fire out, that's good too.
The two times I've used a FE for unplanned fire, I neglected to call for FD help. As it happens, I got the fire out, and there was no danger of spreading fire. Ah, well. At that particular moment, it wasn't a big deal. If I'd used the entire FE and the fire was still going, I'd have phoned for fire department. A lawn mower on fire in the middle of the wet green grass isn't a high risk of conflagration.
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
On 9/16/2013 9:14 AM, Nate Nagel wrote:

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On 9/15/2013 8:05 PM, Higgs Boson wrote:

Right

Not a requirement so no problem.
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On Sun, 15 Sep 2013 12:23:40 -0700 (PDT), Higgs Boson

I think the guy who gave me my first FE also recommended a thing that looks like a vinyl ketchup bottle, all red, with a screw on pointed cap with a hole in it and something inside. He keeps it in his kitchen to sprinkle on small fires.
Also the CO2 extinguishers are probably testable. IIUC a short squeeze of the handle only puts out a little, and CO2 ones are bigger in the first place. But I've never had one. For one thing, they're more money, take up more space and they aren't ABC.
I forget which letter is missing, but it seemed important.
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The bottle of stuff is probably dry chem powder.
Carbon dioxide units are BC rated. And the don't do very well on either of those. Carbon dioxide units are checked for fill, by weight. The tag should say the empty and full weights.
Their only advantage is that they are relatively clean. No powder to sweep and mop up.
Disadvantages include heavy, noisy, and might not put out the fire. So, no powder to clean up and also no vehicle or building cause it burned down.
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
On 9/15/2013 8:11 PM, micky wrote:

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Commercial grade fire extinguishers are required to be inspected by a licen sed inspector annually. They require a 6 year maintenance and a 12 year hy dro test. Any dry chemical FE manufactured prior to October 1984 should be replaced as these FE's no longer meet current code standards. You NEVER w ant to just squeeze the lever a little bit to see if they still work becaus e doing so will slowly release all the explant gas and render the FE useles s when you later might need it. If there is no visual damage to the unit, the gauge is in the green, the hose is unobstructed, you can weigh the FE and make sure it's gross weight is within the range on the label. Most home use FE's are a one-time use FE that CANNOT be serviced or recharg ed and should be replaced every 12 years. When it comes to fire safety, all it takes is one time. If the fire is sma ll enough to put out with your FE, a catastrophe can easily be avoided. Th e cost of a couple FE's for your home or business is a small price to pay. If the fire is too big, leave it to the fire department and save your life .
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On 4/4/2015 1:11 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

a 6 year maintenance and a 12 year hydro test. Any dry chemical FE manufactured prior to October 1984 should be replaced as these FE's no longer meet current code standards. You NEVER want to just squeeze the lever a little bit to see if they still work because doing so will slowly release all the explant gas and render the FE useless when you later might need it. If there is no visual damage to the unit, the gauge is in the green, the hose is unobstructed, you can weigh the FE and make sure it's gross weight is within the range on the label.

catastrophe can easily be avoided. The cost of a couple FE's for your home or business is a small price to pay. If the fire is too big, leave it to the fire department and save your life.

Some wisdom in what you write.
A couple years ago, I took a couple very old Fyr Fyter units out of a couple trailers. No pressure gage, just a push button on one, not sure about the other. I figured they were useless. Tried them out later (outdoors on a fire in a burn barrel). Both were about 20 years old, and both functioned as designed. I was astounded. I'm also pleased that the trailers havd new Kidde units.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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On 04/05/2015 08:49 PM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

And someday maybe we'll make buildings out of materials that don't burn.
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On 4/6/2015 4:25 AM, Senator Pocketstuffer wrote:

Asbestos?
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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On 4/6/2015 4:25 AM, Senator Pocketstuffer wrote:

They already do in many cases. The problem is the contents that burn.
Gil
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That is one thing that puzzles me. The way some of the buildings burn. They seem to be made of concrete and steel. I guess that the inside walls are made of materials that do burn ? It does look like they should be designed so a fire would not spread from one floor or area to another. Living in a small town, I just can not think how it would be to live in some of the buildings that hold almost as many people as a small town would have. Staying in a hotel for a week or so is one thing, but not living there all the time.
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