Fire Extinguishers - when need to replace?

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On Mon, 16 Sep 2013 05:08:15 -0400, Stormin Mormon

off. Either that or it was very badly flooded witha lot of gasoline in the crankcase!!! It definitely wasn't because of a little spritz of ether into the intake.
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On Mon, 16 Sep 2013 07:51:37 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Thanks.
It was only the valve cover. Hard to find one but not a lot of damage.

I definitely used more than a spritz of ether. I didn't see any fire near the detached spark plug wire, but maybe there was but it was invisiible?
If not at that sparkplug wire, did the ether get into the cylinders, up through the valve guides and into the valve cover?
Or maybe there was some vacuum hose into the valve cover and the ether got in that way? a 1970 Ford full-size convertible.
I never did understand how the ether got in the valve cover.
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wrote:

Probably.
I think in this case the door was closed when the fire started.
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On Sunday, September 15, 2013 5:41:08 PM UTC-4, micky wrote:

They are required here in NJ when you get a CO, ie for new contruction, sale, renting, etc. You have to have one in a visible spot in the kitchen.
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I disagree with the pressure gauge needle reading being the sole determinant of whether the FE is still good. Where I live, there is a fire code that requires all fire extinguishers in commercial buildings to be serviced every two years and recharged every 7 years (or something like that). The reason for this is that the white powder inside the FE can consolidate to form a big "clump" which won't come out of the nozzle if and when the day comes when you need that fire extinguisher to work properly. In that case, the propellant gas will come out of the FE, but not the white powder.
So, every couple of years, I have to take my three fire extinguishers in for "servicing", and basically, all that involves is putting the fire extinguisher in an apparatus that holds it horizontal and locates it's center of gravity. The fire extinguisher is then shaken and the location of the center of gravity determined again. If the white powder inside it has clumped together, then the center of gravity of the FE won't move because the powder inside didn't get redistributed when the FE was shaken. If it did move, then it's because the powder was redistributed when the FE was shaken. That determines whether or not the powder inside it is still loose and will flow freely when the FE is used, or if it's clumped together so that it won't flow out of the FE as a thick "fog" of particles.
And, every 7 years I have to have all three fire extinguishers recharged, and that basically involves replacing the powder and propellant in the FE and costs considerably more than just having it serviced.
If you're required to have your fire extinguisher recharged, THAT's when you want to pull the pin on it and use it LIKE you would in an emergency because the powder and propellant is going to be replaced anyhow. But, be prepared for a big white clowd of dust to come out of it that will sit in your driveway for days. (Maybe go to an empty field to use the FE.)
There are different fire code requirements for fire extinguishers. For example, here in Winnipeg they made it mandatory that all fire extinguishers in commercial buildings dispense their powder through a hose, and not just a nozzle. Apparantly, people were saying that holding the fire extinguisher so that the nozzle was pointed at the base of the fire was harder than just holding the fire extinguisher and pointing the end of the hose at the base of the fire. So, whether or not your fire extinguisher needs to be equipped with a hose or not depends on your local fire code.
Also, fire extinguishers are rated according to the weight of the powder inside them. My local fire code requires that I have a five pound fire extinguisher on each floor. That means there's 5 pounds of powder inside the FE. But, other places could require a 10 pound FE instead.
--
nestork

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Invert, shake, thump, shake.
Walmart. Buy two or three more.
I'm not sure who handles recharge codes. Building department, most likely. For commercial buildings.
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
On 9/15/2013 4:59 PM, Higgs Boson wrote:

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On 9/15/2013 4:59 PM, Higgs Boson wrote:

At work I have a local company inspect the FE every year. It is an OSHA requirement. I forget the details but every X years it has to be pressure tested and refilled. The cost is reasonable, much less than a new unit.
In our case, we have about 40 units so they come to us, but you can take yours to them. Check the yellow pages for fire equioment.
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I heard about a school teacher who opened the valve just a bit, and filled the entire room with white powder:)
He was replaced before the next year.....
another funny from that school, they caught the students printing bogus 20s......
their printing equiptement was excellent
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I heard about a part time employee who absentmindedly leaned on a dry chem unit that was hanging on the wall. The resulting discharge shut down the fast food restaurant for the rest of the day for cleaning.
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
On 9/15/2013 5:06 PM, bob haller wrote:

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On Sun, 15 Sep 2013 19:20:42 -0400, Stormin Mormon

I know a guy who set off the Ansul system in his restaurant. In the process of cleaning up the mess, he threw out all of the food in his walk-in and freezer. The next day he found out that the "chemical" was baking soda. D'oh!
The opposite; a cow-orker had a kitchen fire and used a dry-chemical FW to put out the fire. The chemical ruined every switch and piece of electronics in the house. When the insurance agent found out what happened, he said it would have been better to do nothing.
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On Sun, 15 Sep 2013 19:59:11 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

After I used my ABC FE on my oven, and days before the window in front of the oven broke, I realized I could not possibly clean well a continuously cleaning oven. So I called an FE company and asked what if some of the powder fell on the food, and he said, Not a problem.

Huh. I wonder what that was. My cheap kidde ABC, about as big as a small propane gas tank for a hand held torch, that sprays powder was used on the top of the oven too, but didn't damage anything. The range hood is still fine, the radios in the room, the tv.
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wrote:

It was a fairly common dry fire extinguisher at the time. The blue powder got into everything and was highly corrosive.
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On Sunday, September 15, 2013 2:06:17 PM UTC-7, bob haller wrote:

Are they in Congress now? Much easier way to steal. No equipment needed.
HB
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"Higgs Boson" wrote in message
The hread about freon, etc. was very educational.
Brought up a question bothering me: How can one tell if FE is still OK?
Mine is a very old Kidde, big red puppy; A.B.C. Indicator is still in the green, albeit leaning toward the left (recharge).
Has never been used(thank goodness!)
However, I don't want to find out the hard way that it is over the hill.
Can I squeeze the lever a little, to see if it works? Don't hit me; I'm just ignorant!
The new ones that size range from $40+ on up. I'm not trying to nickel & dime my home's safety; just want to know if there's a way to test this. If the test shows it's still good, fine. If it shows no good, at least I know what to do, $$ notwithstanding.
Any help appreciated.
HB
After reading all the replies, I will check mine with the balance then shake and recheck balance. I keep one in each vehicle. One in kitchen. One in garage and two in basement and work shop area. Thanks for all the answers found here. WW
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On Sunday, September 15, 2013 4:22:25 PM UTC-7, WW wrote:

Me Three! Stuff I did not know, like upending and shaking to loosen up possibly caked powder!
Think I will get another for the kitchen.
Re: Inspection, sounds like that would be for business, not private home. Interesting thought: Would fire insurance not pay or pay less if homeowner hadn't had any FEs in the house?
OK, this has been wunderbar. You guys may have saved somebody's *** among the AHRrs who are reading this exchange.
HB
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Most fires, the ordinary citizen is the first on the scene. A home owner with a FE will do more good for the world than fire trucks after a ten minute response time. I applaud you for having a FE, and also for caring about your self and others.
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
On 9/15/2013 8:05 PM, Higgs Boson wrote:

Would fire insurance not pay or pay less if homeowner hadn't had any FEs in the house?

this exchange.

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On Sun, 15 Sep 2013 20:20:33 -0400, Stormin Mormon

OTOH, a FE likely to be seen in a home has one purpose in life; to get your ass out.
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On Sunday, September 15, 2013 10:06:26 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

Which of course is another nutty KRW opinion. If a fire is so extensive that you can't get out, the typical, small home fire extinguisher is unlikely to change that. In my world, a fire extinguisher is typically used to put out a small fire, like a stove fire, before it has time to spread.
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In my world, situational awareness is what helps keep me safe. Also working smoke detector, which gets a brand new battery twice a year. And the monoxide detector also gets new batteries (two AA) twice a year.
As with my esteemed colleague, FE is only for very small fires. If I'm not 100% plus percent sure I can put it out with one FE, I'm on the phone to 911 to call for fire department to do their thing. Might go to two FE, if I'm really pumping adrenaline and lose track of time. But no more than three. Or four. I can stop any time I want. Honest. Honey, get me another FE, and be quick about it!
In public places, or if I can see the fire is spreading (school, nursing home, or grass fire) call 911 for fire department BEFORE going after the fire. The minute earlier response may save my own self, or someone else.
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
On 9/17/2013 7:30 AM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

In my world, a fire extinguisher is typically used to put out a small fire, like a

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On Tue, 17 Sep 2013 04:30:16 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

Only more proof of what a moronic ass Trader is. I suppose you would go into a burning structure armed with a FE. You prove me more right with every post. trader. You are indeed ARE a dumbshit!
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