FIOS doesn t work without AC?

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David Lesher wrote:

With the internal charger? It would look like a bad battery and shut down, if the charger design is any good.

How do you propose a way to force them to keep copper when a lot of 'copper' circuits are only metallic for the last mile or less? IOW, it's already mostly a fiber backbone. That last mile has the highest maintenance costs, and will be replaced no matter what you want. The line to my house has had an intermittent hum problem that they can't find. When it shows up I call on a VOIP number to report it. The line clears up about three to five minutes before they arrive, or it starts working right after they verify that there is a problem.
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You know, that sounds like a very bad decision.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
I spoke to someone from Verizon this morning who said that their plan is to start removing copper and transition everyone over to fiber. Thus ensuring that in the event of a disaster nobody has phone service after a few hours. I asked about a bigger battery and was told that the charger they use isn't powerful enough for it.
They call this progress.
By the way, when they install fios they take away the copper wire so you can never go back to it.
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On 11/3/2012 12:14 AM, snipped-for-privacy@brainchampagne.com wrote:

start removing copper and transition everyone over to fiber. Thus ensuring that in the event of a disaster nobody has phone service after a few hours. I asked about a bigger battery and was told that the charger they use isn't powerful enough for it.

Verizon put a fios line to my house to replace the copper wire. It connects back to the land line box. There is a battery back up in the fios line in the house. We had been having a lot of copper wire problems and Verizon did this to solve the problem. We do not have internet or TV with them.
I also have Comcast and got the triple play (internet, TV and phone) as the cheapest package when I up graded to HD sets and DVR. The modem where phone is connected has battery backup but the internet is not backed up, only the Comcast phone.
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On 11/3/2012 6:59 AM, Frank wrote:

There was an interesting problem with comcast. The large area near here fortunately only had some trees down but extensive power failures (and of course the cable is down because there is no power for the various system pieces). So if you had a generator and thought you were going to watch all of stuff you recorded on your comcast DVR you weren't allowed to do it because unless the cable box can talk to the mother ship you can't use it for anything except maybe to prop a door open.
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On 11/3/2012 9:29 AM, George wrote:

>> Verizon put a fios line to my house to replace the copper wire. It

Have not faced that problem. I do have a generator but it is not wired in to where I have my DVR. I had thought that the recorded shows were on a hard drive in the DVR and it always tells you how much space is being used. We've been lucky the last few years and I can't recall more than a half day's power outage since I bought the generator and cable or copper line signals were never lost.
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On Sun, 04 Nov 2012 19:13:03 -0500, Frank

When I moved, last spring, I thought I could take the cable box with me and watch the recorded stuff until I got satellite hooked up. The shows are recorded on the local disk drive but, he's right. Without communications with the mothership, the box is no more than an expensive door stop.
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On 11/3/2012 12:14 AM, snipped-for-privacy@brainchampagne.com wrote:

start removing copper and transition everyone over to fiber. Thus ensuring that in the event of a disaster nobody has phone service after a few hours. I asked about a bigger battery and was told that the charger they use isn't powerful enough for it.

Not true, and I'm speaking from my personal experience and current situation with VZ. I had FIOS TV/Internet installed last winter and did so by having VZ promise in writing that they would allow me to retain my POTS circuit with them. They agreed. I'm spending about $5/mo more than if I had gone with their "Triple Play" option but have the security of a phone circuit that has never failed in almost 26 years despite at least a dozen power outages that exceed the FIOS backup battery duration. They let you retain your POTS by creating a second account for your address. Your FIOS account is then linked to your address rather than your phone number.
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On 11-03-2012 00:14, snipped-for-privacy@brainchampagne.com wrote:

start removing copper and transition everyone over to fiber. Thus ensuring that in the event of a disaster nobody has phone service after a few hours. I asked about a bigger battery and was told that the charger they use isn't powerful enough for it.

I guess you mean they disconnect it and refuse to reconnect.
They're not going to pay someone to dig up your yard for ten cents worth of 22-gauge wire.
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Dig? Wires are overhead. The tech who came to the house this week said he didn't see copper leading to the house.
I take that to mean that when they put in the fiber they removed the other wiring. Not for the wire but for business reasons.
On Saturday, November 3, 2012 12:30:08 PM UTC-4, Wes Groleau wrote:

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On 11-03-2012 12:35, snipped-for-privacy@brainchampagne.com wrote:

That is true. In some places.
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On Sat, 3 Nov 2012 09:35:44 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@brainchampagne.com wrote:

I have underground so I think in those terms, and I took it to mean that they cut off the wire it goes into the ground.

Others have said this is their plan too, btw, and they certainly pushed it on me a lot when I called about an internet outage.

few hours. I asked about a bigger battery and was told that the charger they use isn't powerful enough for it.

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On 11/3/2012 12:14 AM, snipped-for-privacy@brainchampagne.com wrote:

start removing copper and transition everyone over to fiber. Thus ensuring that in the event of a disaster nobody has phone service after a few hours. I asked about a bigger battery and was told that the charger they use isn't powerful enough for it.

If you were the phone company what would you do? You have an aging copper plant and you have a new fiber system that can perform all of the functionality of the copper plant plus add additional capabilities. Would you continue to maintain the copper plant and also the fiber plant?
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wrote:

start removing copper and transition everyone over to fiber. Thus ensuring that in the event of a disaster nobody has phone service after a few hours. I asked about a bigger battery and was told that the charger they use isn't powerful enough for it.

But they are supposed to have agreed with the Public Utility Commission in some states not to remove the copper, for the sake of a later owner, even if the current one promises to always want fios.
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On Saturday, November 3, 2012 12:14:34 AM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@brainchampagne.com wrote:

Phone companies are not charities. They are losing money on copper land line service, so they either go out of business and leave you with NO phone service at all, or they switch to something that they can market, namely FIOS. Then they can upsell you for broadband Internet service.
Copper land line service is no good if the generators powering the switching equipment run out of fuel, or are flooded, or get knocked over by an earthquake too...
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On Tue, 6 Nov 2012 10:12:56 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I don't think there is any chance they'll go out of business. If FIOS is cheaper for them, and I don't know why it would be, they can save money by putting in fios for those who want it (and leaving tghe rest of us alone.)

they can market, namely FIOS. Then they can upsell you for broadband Internet service.

equipment run out of fuel, or are flooded, or get knocked over by an earthquake too...
And how is that different from generators powering fios?
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On 11/6/2012 1:28 PM, micky wrote:

They have already lost 60% of their subscribers. Do you think it makes sense to maintain an entire end to end copper plant for say a handful of users?

they can market, namely FIOS. Then they can upsell you for broadband Internet service.

equipment run out of fuel, or are flooded, or get knocked over by an earthquake too...

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On 11/6/2012 1:12 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

service, so they either go out of business and leave you with NO phone service at all, or they switch to something that they can market, namely FIOS. Then they can upsell you for broadband Internet service.

equipment run out of fuel, or are flooded, or get knocked over by an earthquake too...

If Verizon was making so much money with FIOS, they would be pushing it into the majority of the country where it remains unavailable. The reason VZ stopped building out FIOS service is because it has not been profitable for them. However, as far as overall profits are concerned, have you checked the annual reports of the major TELCOs? Almost all of the them are making money hand over fist.
I'm getting into politics now but I consider phone service to be a national security asset, which should not be an "unregulated" private enterprise. I believe it should be heavily regulated, if not downright managed by the government, just as I believe should be the post office. the railroads, the airlines, and the energy utilities. It seems to me that when those assets were heavily regulated or even government run, back in the 1940s - 1980s, it didn't stop this nation from growing the largest and financially strongest middle class in world history. Is it only a coincidence that the market instability and closing of opportunities for upward mobility in our society has coincided with progressive deregulation of those same assets?
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wrote:

The test is going on right now. Conventional telephone service is highly regulated; cell phone service much less so.
I'm wondering what would happen if regulations were to be removed from conventional service. I'll guess that subscrber prices would rise rapidly and traditional companies would exit asap. However, clever new companies might well figure out how to keep the copper around if there were fewer regulations.
Tomsic
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You can charge a battery from the land phone lines. Illegally in the UK. I expect it is illegal in America too.
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micky wrote:

Well, yeah, the modem has to be powered by SOMETHING (it's not like a tin can on a string).
While you can install a UPS ahead of your modem, there are power requirements for the signal up the line.
After a recent outage, a Comcast technician told me someone ripped open one of their street-level boxes in the next block - not a small job - to steal the two auto batteries it contained!
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