FIOS doesn t work without AC?

Page 2 of 5  


They better; a CO is required to have backup power and does.
--
A host is a host from coast to snipped-for-privacy@nrk.com
& no one will talk to a host that's close........[v].(301) 56-LINUX
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Verizon isn't a charity but it IS a public utility.
For what it's worth they gave us fios service (albeit with no long distance, and 10 cent local calls) for the price of what copper basic service should be, around $30/month (most of which is taxes or pseudo-taxes).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
David Lesher wrote:

I haven't seen a real Central Office in decades. Just small switching centers that are being replaced with packet switching hardware. Most are the size of a one car garage, to have room to store spare boards & equipment.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/06/2012 11:04 PM, Michael A. Terrell wrote:

I remember seeing the Central Office in Ft. Worth, with a lot of big batteries (they said some of the batteries were from old submarines). The batteries were supposed to be able to power everything for at least 24 hours, with generators for longer outages.
That was about 31 years ago.
BTW, they had more operators come to work during snowstorms and after football games.
--
48 days until the winter celebration (Tue Dec 25, 2012 12:00:00 AM).

Mark Lloyd
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mark Lloyd wrote:

Operators, 3i years ago? they must have still been a Strowager type Central office if they were that out of date. My home town had it's first generation ESS Central Office before that. It replaced some 1920's design junk. The batteries were designed for the application. I doubt submarine batteries would last long in that application since C.O. batteries are on float charge 99.9% of the time.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11-07-2012 17:34, Michael A. Terrell wrote:

I operated a pull-out-out-the-cord-and-plug-it-in switchboard for a few days in 1973.
On Navy ships in the late 1970s, we still had click-click-click rotating stepper switches.
--
Wes Groleau

I won't burn your Koran because I don't want you to burn my Bible;
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Wes Groleau wrote:

Not many were left by then.

Strowger stepper.
<http://t0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcR1YMkG7qiygjslORZGAFHqGQzJE-4-IEcMxudCY1Nftoo6TKolEKcXApy8
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11-07-2012 20:37, Michael A. Terrell wrote:

Like <
http://www.telephonetribute.com/images/fig3-2.gif
but much smaller. Just served one building.

<http://t0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcR1YMkG7qiygjslORZGAFHqGQzJE-4-IEcMxudCY1Nftoo6TKolEKcXApy8 Well, same principle, I think, though it doesn't look the same. I wasn't trained on it, but by watching it work, I think I figured it out. I think we had two-digit numbers. Pick up a phone and a one-axis rotor would step to the correct line of ten. Another would then select the first rotor out of ten. Then one or two would connect that phone to one of ten or a hundred lines to the other side, and the process in reverse would select the right destination phone.
--
Wes Groleau

Trying to be happy is like trying to build a machine for which
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 07 Nov 2012 20:37:19 -0500, "Michael A. Terrell"

Mike that is an ordinary stepper, not a Strowger
Please see:
http://www.google.com/patents?id=PShCAAAAEBAJ&pg=PA2&source=gbs_selected_pages&cad=2#v=onepage&q&f=false ?-)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
josephkk wrote:

><http://t0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcR1YMkG7qiygjslORZGAFHqGQzJE-4-IEcMxudCY1Nftoo6TKolEKcXApy8
That was what Google barfed up when i seacrched for Strowger, and I haven't seen the real thing since the mid '60s. :)

http://www.google.com/patents?id=PShCAAAAEBAJ&pg=PA2&source=gbs_selected_pages&cad=2#v=onepage&q&f lse
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

CO's are still around; it's just the switches in them are far smaller. And they still have generators. And fuel. In the derecho in July, the CO down the road was on generator for several days.
For whatever reason, FIOS always runs to a CO, not to a DLC in the neighberhood.
You can't be forced to have FIOS for dialtone in any case I have seen; as FIOS is not regulated. An obvious example: where there is no AC power such as a building site. And while it is true the DLC has only hours of batteries, the telco has an obligation to keep it powered.
As for the ""too big a battery fable..."; it's not worth debunking again.
--
A host is a host from coast to snipped-for-privacy@nrk.com
& no one will talk to a host that's close........[v].(301) 56-LINUX
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
They give you fiber service at the regulated price, since the copper's been removed you can't have copper service anymore. And by 'copper' I include 'century-old, time-tested, reliable service.'
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
micky wrote:

central offices with a #5 ESS or whatever. It is all moving to ATM backbone, which is essentially an internet backbone. They put RT's in the neighborhood that are hooked to a fiber, and branch out copper cable to the neighborhood. So, the switches are several hundred to a thousand or so subscriber lines, and distributed all over the landscape, instead of one building per town. If you drive around, you'll see these boxes all over the place. There are usually 3 boxes, the RT unit itself, a power entry module with an electric meter on it, and a wire cabinet.
We have Charter cable here as the only alternative to DSL (which doesn't work well in our region due to the crappy phone cables) and they have somewhere around 8 hours of batteries in each box, which serves a couple blocks. When they have an extended outage, you see them bring out a little gas generator to each pole with the Charter Pipeline box. Must be a big pain to set up all those generators.
I can't answer to FIOS, but I'm sure there have to be neighborhood concentrators, as they can't possibly run miles of fiber to EACH residence. Fiber has insane capacity, so they can concentrate traffic for hundreds of high-speed service customers onto one fiber. And, I'm sure those concentrators only have so much backup battery capacity.
Jon
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Cable has battery powered boxes too.
I had some trees profesionally trimed, I could of died that day:( The tree guy brought down a 15,000 volt main distribution line and knocked out power for miles. had nice explosion One neighbor had no brains and attempted to drive over the downed line so she could park her car in her garage. Neighbors complained the outage messed up their dinner. cable billed the tree trimers insurance for 15 grand since their main hub was across the street. they had 50 trucks roll each to power one amplifier repeater. the tree guys knocked over my pole light which broke the underground power line. the whole mess took many hours to correct, there was a burn mark in the asphalt street till it was repaved. I stiffed the tree trimers for part of their bill for the damage to my home....
I was going to direct traffic and would of been standing right where that power line fell. no more bob.
Up till then I always wanted to see a high voltage short, after that I never wanted to see one again
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

False. You can look up your Central Office location several places. First, DSL Reports has a "find your CO" function. And http://localcallingguide.com does as well.
Your FIOS and DSL and POTS are fed from that building.
Take the case of 314-935, a WashU prefix, that's CLLI STLSMO07DSA at 6214 Delmar <http://goo.gl/maps/tgNWk Note the logo at the doorway.
Now, if you have POTS it's likely fed from a switch there. If you get FIOS, (which you can't in SBC-land) it's fed from there but all the "dial tone" is from one central switch in the area; in DC's case, Reston VA. (You still get a 314-935 type number...)

Sure there is ATM between CO's.

That's a DLC. If you have POTS, you might be fed from one. But the glass from it runs to ... a CO building. The DLC's are pretty stupid; they are just muxes. The next step up is a 5ESS Remote; fed by a 5E. But the Remotes I have seen are in buildings, not pedestals.
And FIOS is fed from a CO; I have yet to see one fed from a DLC.

The gotcha is they do not have enough generators to do every HFC; and if they leave them, they often grow legs.....

Yes, they have such in your neighborhood. They are in beige boxes.

They have zero battery backup, cuz there's nothing in a FIOS splitter needing power. Each fiber to the CO splits out to feed 32 house fibers. The splitting is done with a prism; there is nothing powered in the box.
FIOS needs power at the house, and the CO...and nowhere else.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

That's right and one of the things that has changed now is moving the batteries that ran the wired telephone system from the central station to the user's property. There's no reason to be content with limited battery time or even in-house batteries though. The batteries could easily be set up to charge with a solar cell and the battery could also be put into the cabinet that services the neighborhood - also with a solar panel to charge it. FIOS and U-Verse should be pushed to do that.
Tomsic
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

There is nothing active between the FIOS CO and your ONT. If your ONT has power, there's no reason for it to go down.
--
A host is a host from coast to snipped-for-privacy@nrk.com
& no one will talk to a host that's close........[v].(301) 56-LINUX
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Posted and mailed, if you don't mind. .
Even though you weren't on the phone for most of that time? Maybe you talked for an hour and it still went dead after 9?

At first I didn't care about internet, because I don't have a laptop yet, but I plan to get one. With DSL that I have now, that works even when the power is out, right? (Assuming there is power at the telephone company.)

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
micky wrote:

DC, but the voltages vary by manufacturer.
Jon
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That's their wish, but they can not force. The copper is regulated, the fiber is not. The Suits have been making noises about "maximizing our investment" which means "coerce people to giving up copper..." For example, I cannot upgrade my DSL because FIO$ is available here.

Bingo, why do you care if it takes a week to fully recharge a 75AH deep cycle battery....?

Unless you can make good threats...their legal basis is iffy.

Bingo. And FIO$ keeps going up in cost.
--
A host is a host from coast to snipped-for-privacy@nrk.com
& no one will talk to a host that's close........[v].(301) 56-LINUX
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.