Finishing Oak Baseboards

Hello,
I have stripped the red oak baseboards in a room of my 1920's house and are now wondering how best to finish them. They are sanded down to bare wood, and I am not interested in staining them.
I was thinking of using Danish Oil; anyone have experience using that on oak baseboards (and two door frames, as well)? Other suggestions?
Thanks for you help!
Chris
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Christopher Riley wrote:

If you did a good job sanding, the Danish oil would be a fine way to go. The stuff stinks to high heaven, is toxic and the used rags can spontaneously combust, but you probably already know that.
Most people would go with a polyurethane, but the Danish oil is easier to repair and I think it looks a lot better.
R
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Danish oil is not really toxic.
http://www.environmentalhomecenter.com/shop.mv?CatCode=PRODUCT&ProdCode=TT_FURN_FINISH Tried & True finishes are based on pure linseed oil, without any of the petroleum-based solvents or heavy-metal driers that are typically added to products labeled as "boiled linseed." Joe Robson, an experienced cabinetmaker and finisher in upstate New York, crafted the Tried & True formulas to match the quality of finish of fine antique furniture. His finishes are made with techniques similar to those used by varnish makers in the mid-1800s.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

http://www.environmentalhomecenter.com/shop.mv?CatCode=PRODUCT&ProdCode=TT_FURN_FINISH
I've never seen that "green" Danish oil, and can't comment on its quality. When people say Danish oil they are frequently refering to a Watco product (great stuff, BTW), or something similar. This from the Watco MSDS: Acute Health Effects:     From MSDS Inhalation: A burning sensation in the nose and throat, cough, a feeling of difficulty in breathing. Also headache, dizziness, staggering gait, confusion, unconsciousness or coma. Eye Contact: Primary irritation. Skin Contact: Primary irritation Ingestion: May cause gastrointestinal irritation and nausea. Medical Conditions Generally Aggravated by Exposure: Anesthesia, respiratory tract irritation, dermatitis, nausea, vomiting.
R
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are
oak
As you will be the one living with it whatever you prefer is best.
Just remember that stain is not just for color but also can help hide/fill some flaws, and protect the wood if it's in a room where sunlight hits it. Also all oil will darken wood over time, and you will have to keep maintaining it.
AMUN
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I would use the lightest stain you can find instead of using no stain. The stain helps bring out the wood grain and may look better. If you have a closet or a hiden section I would try it on that first to make sure.

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We stained oak base boards with a light oil stain and when dry sprayed with clear lacquer. That was 10 years ago and it still looks great. WW
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