Finishing basment

I am thinking about finishing my basement and have two questions. The basement is cinder block walls with a poured concrete floor. When framing the walls should I nail to the floor using a ramset or would something like liquid nails work? I also have one place where I will need to attach the drywall directly to the cinder block, what would be the best adhesive/method to use?
Thanks Jerry
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snipped-for-privacy@burle.com wrote:

Why not metal framing with a nailgun. its what was used in my basement. And why dryall directly to cinderblock? Seems like bad idea.
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CL Gilbert
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I need to attach the drywall to the block along one side of the stairs. The stairs run right along the block wall and there is no room to put in studs. The main reason I have not consider metal framing is I have never used it in the past and would feel more comfortable working with would, besides I don't own a nail gun and don't really want to spend the money one.
Thanks Jerry
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I'd use a powder type nail gun to fasten the framing to the concrete floor. Remington makes one that uses 22 cartridges. In the stairwell where you can't do std framing, I would fasten furring strips to the block wall, then attach the drywall to that. I wouldn't try to glue drywall directly to the block wall.
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On 17 Aug 2005 13:22:33 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Ditto that. I also put some 1/2" foil covered foam board between the furring strips for a bit of insulation and moisture barrier. Also ditto on the Remington nail gun. You'll need the heaviest cartridge for nailing into the floor. Wear eye protection. FWIW YMMV DFB
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snipped-for-privacy@burle.com wrote:

Rent one. Still wouldnt drywall right to cinderblock. use some spacers or furring strips or somethin.
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CL Gilbert
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On 08/17/05 03:25 pm snipped-for-privacy@burle.com tossed the following ingredients into the ever-growing pot of cybersoup:

I used a Ramset-type device, but phps Liquid Nails would work.
I also have one place where I

Everything I've read says to build a stud wall spaced away from the block or concrete wall, then sheetrock that.
Perce
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Drywall should not go right on block. use some furring strips and 3/8" drywall to minimize incursion into your stairwell. As for attaching to floor, I have used powder actuated nailers and I have used tapcon screws. Construction adhesive will slow you down (Set wall in place and wait for glue to dry) I suppose if you are doing one section at a time and your walls are snug to the floor joists above the construction adhesive may be OK. You can get a remmington powder actuated nailer for about $20 and it should work like a champ. Drill an tapcon is most secure. The nails can pull out. Screw if you are concerned about it.

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Even with a firing strip to stand the drywall off of the block I would glue on a foam insul-board. This will slow moisture incursion (more than you think) as well as insulate. Did it in my basement 25 yrs ago and it has held up well. I wish I had done as Hrry K did with the low ceiling. Even covering the screws with batten strips would have helped. Oh well...

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In my area, building codes require the walls to be secured to the floor with fasteners. I used Ramset nails and cracked the slab at one place. It's tedious and not as fun as gunpowder charges, but masonry bolts might be safer.
Don't attach drywall to block. It *will* mold. Would furring and styrofoam board insulation fit?
Also remember that block walls are not straight or plumb.
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Please use a suspended ceiling, not real drywall. Cause any future repairs will be a lot of extra work. Having open beams in the cellar really makes work easier.
I know -- done enough work in cellars.
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Christopher A. Young
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

Agree. When I did mine, I used particle board applied with screws with an eye to needed to get at wiring/plumbing. Have had to be in there several times since. Doesn't look at all bad for a basement if it is not used as a living area. I couldn't do a suspended ceiling as the head space was low to begin with and even an inch was too much to give up (6'8")
Harry K
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I agree with you that it is easier, more convenient, etc. But I have priced out the difference in cost. I can re-drywall my entire basement ceiling about 6 times for what it will cost for a suspended ceiling. Plus drywall looks better and will give more headroom. All the labor is mine. So, I figure, for me, I will plan as best possible for all future needs, add some conduit and pull strings where possible and the drywall the ceiling.

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If you think it all out now, and fix the obvious problems that already exist, before they go critical, you have no reason not to drywall the ceiling. As you already realize it's not really that hard to redo it later IF necessary.
You will likely only need a small hole to fix any future problem, unless you get into major household (structural) renovations. but even then several sheets of drywall is still cheap to replace.
Always amazed at the rationalization most people use to NOT drywall the basement ceiling especially in a two story house where the main floor ceiling has all the services for the second floor.
AMUN

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If you really want to drywall the block, go into the siding department and get 1/4" styrofoam for a backer. If it was me I would do an old fashion plaster job. It can look just like drywall without the problems you may incure with drywall.
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If you have no room to fur out the area around the steps you might consider spraying texture on the block when you texture the sheetrock and then paint it. I have done two walls in that manner and they have held up just fine for ten years now. It also looks much better than you would think.
CR
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do not glue sheetrock to the blocks, not even greenboard you must have some sort of vapor barrier and furring to allow at least minimal air space for insulation/venting
If really pressed for space, use cement board (as used in tubs) and thinset/concrete nails to "glue" it
or just thinset/hydrotite cement parged over the blocks.
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Use 2.5" concrete nails to secure the bottom plate to the floor. Put a layer of foam "sill gasket" under the bottom plate first to keep it off the concrete

Can you attach some 1" x 2" strapping ( 3/4" thick) to the concrete first, maybe with construction adhesive, then screw rock onto the strapping ?
R
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