Finishing basement: walls or floors first?

Hi. I waterproofed the basement exterior last year and I'm finishing the basement interior this year. It's concrete block walls on concrete slab. My plan is to glue 2" styrofoam insulation sheets to the interior wall in a contiguous manner (to act as insulation and vapor barrier), install metal studs in front of this insulation, and then install concrete board or paperless sheetrock in front of that. My goal is to make it as unattractive as possible for mold growth. I've read that this is an accepted practice.
I also want to install ceramic tile on the floor.
If I put the walls up first, I'll never be able to run the tile to the concrete block wall and thus create a depression around the perimeter where, if I got water, would cause problems as it's not seen. If I install the ceramic tile floor first, I run the risk of damaging the tile during wall installation.
What is the typical approach in this case?? All advice appreciated. Regards, Theodore
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On Sat, 17 Sep 2011 20:44:53 -0700 (PDT), millinghill

Consider how the living space of a house is constructed -- the deck (sub-floor) is constructed first and then the walls. After the walls are built and drywalled the attention turns to the floor. The underlayment is installed and then the floor covering -- tile, carpet, hardwood or whatever. I can't imagine building the floor UNDER the walls.
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On Sat, 17 Sep 2011 23:41:00 -0500, Gordon Shumway

the floor first, then install the partitions. Makes it a pain to replace flooring at a later date, but makes it easy to move partitions (walls) - so I guess it's 6 of 1, half dozen of the other.
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millinghill wrote:

Wall first of course.
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<snip<
If you think water could be a future problem, why are you using metal studs?
Joe
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I plan to use metal studs because they wont provide food for mold.
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Or even covering the walls if that's where the water would come from. For good drainage, it's important that the floor is sloped, and is higher at the wall. That's how my basement is. I don't know anything about metal studs The part of my basement that is wood paneled has 2x4 footers against the outside walls. No insulation. I've had 2 floods of 4-8", and when the water drained off all that dried off with no apparent damage and no mold I've seen. I ran fans down there for a couple weeks each time, and the basement isn't naturally damp. So the answer to drainage is proper sloping from the wall. For the OP's main concern, I'd do the framing, then tile to it so grouting would meet the footers, then cover the walls last. No voids for water to set in. Again, I don't even know what metal footer looks like.
Basements are different, and I don't know the OP's setup. My basement is poured foundation, below ground except the top 18". I don't how much heat insulation would save. Some for sure, as the snow slowly melts away around the foundation. If I ever insulated, I'd use the foam panels. I'd never use sheetrock in my basement lower than 18" off the floor. That would be wood paneling or something else that won't fall apart if it got soaked by flooding, and it could be replaced easily without tearing out floor to ceiling sheetrock. Basically 18" of wainscoting. But I just wouldn't use sheetrock down there. Not an expert, but I've given some thought to how I'd insulate my basement.
--Vic
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Please see sketch:
http://i899.photobucket.com/albums/ac194/millinghill/basementwall-floor.jpg
I'm concerned that if I install the XPS and stud wall per this sketch, I'll be left with a depression underneath these two items due to the thinset and tile I want to install. My other option is to install thinset and tile first, but then I run the risk of damaging the tile floor with all this stud wall construction taking place over it. 3rd option is what "Bill" suggested below: to make a sill under the XPS and stud wall similar in thickness to thinset&tile. But my concern is that may spall as it's so thin and so narrow.
Opinions appreciated!
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On Wed, 21 Sep 2011 12:40:34 -0700 (PDT), millinghill

What "depression" are you concerned about? The only problem I saw with your sketch is the sheetrock is over the tile. Typically, the sheetrock is done before the floor. The tile would go up to, but not under, the sheetrock. Any resulting gap would be covered by trim.
Quit agonizing about the job and just do it.
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Hi and thanks for the feedback.
I've highlighted the area in red that I consider a" depression" that has potential to take on water if there's a leak. See this version:
http://i899.photobucket.com/albums/ac194/millinghill/basementwall-floor-1.jpg
I don't want to run the drywall down to be flush with the floor because I want to prevent it from wicking up moisture if any occurs in the future. I can put a plastic kickplate over the gap, so it's not an aesthetic concern.
Just wondering what other folks have done in similar situations? Or do you just live with potential of water filling this area if there's a minor spill/plumbing issue/wall leak.

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Anna Falcone wrote:

Put down a mess of 1/2x1/2" sticks.
Position the sheetrock on the sticks before nailing it to the wall. Remove (if you can) the sticks.
Later, you tile can slide under the sheetrock - or not - depending on your inclinations.
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Hi and thanks for the feedback. I've highlighted the area in red that I consider a" depression" that has potential to take on water if there's a leak. See this version: http://i899.photobucket.com/albums/ac194/millinghill/basementwall-flo ... I don't want to run the drywall down to be flush with the floor because I want to prevent it from wicking up moisture if any occurs in the future. I can put a plastic kickplate over the gap, so it's not an aesthetic concern.
Just wondering what other folks have done in similar situations? Or do you just live with potential of water filling this area if there's a minor spill/plumbing issue/wall leak.
- Show quoted text -

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Hi and thanks for the feedback. I've highlighted the area in red that I consider a" depression" that has potential to take on water if there's a leak. See this version:
http://i899.photobucket.com/albums/ac194/millinghill/detail.jpg
I don't want to run the drywall down to be flush with the floor because I want to prevent it from wicking up moisture if any occurs in the future. I can put a plastic kickplate over the gap, so it's not an aesthetic concern.
Just wondering what other folks have done in similar situations? Or do you just live with potential of water filling this area if there's a minor spill/plumbing issue/wall leak.

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