finishing basement - furnace q.

I want to frame some walls and hang drywall, is there some building code that says how close you can build next to a furnace? I'm in wisconsin if it's different from state to state, where can I look up this information? What is a safe distance?
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Usually the info is in the installation manual of the furnace, or perhaps on the furnace cabinet. You could always go to the manufacturer's website and get the specs.
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Right: Also, you should check your local codes - there will be other requirements, too.
Pop
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Building codes are local. Phone city hall, ask for building code info. Some places have it on line.
That said, code doesn't often differ that much from place to place. Here, Calgary AB, code is framing 24 inches from the front of the furnace (to allow people to work on it.), six inches otherwise. One inch clearance from B vent. Doorway into furnace room must be 2'8".
The safe distance is code or better. Preferably better.
Ken
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On Fri, 24 Feb 2006 20:20:31 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@nospam.tnx wrote:

Ken, 24" on the front wont cut it. Next time you are bored to tears, go try and slide out the blower assembly from your furnace/air handler. The code is 30" to the front and thats also in the instructions of all the furnaces. Keep in mind, that is MINIMUM. Try squeezing a 6'-3" 240lb tech in that space with your blower assembly and you will see what Im talking about. Bubba
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wrote:

Question wasn't what was practical or desirable. Seems to me I also said, better than code was desireable. OP Question was what what code requirements are. My answer was check with the local city hall. I cited what code is here. If code is thirty inches where you are ... then so be it.
I have no interest in squeezing a six foot three, two hundred forty pound tech in that space or anywhere else. <grin>
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You're right, but some of the "other things" I had in mind were air supply for the burner, outside air supply if needed, positive/negative pressure control, stuff like that.
The furnace itself will have its own stated clearances which can vary widely from zero clearance to 36", just for fire code, not for service. My zero-clearance furnace requires as little as 4" on the sides & nothing on top of the back, for spacing, but it requires 3.5 square feet of air supply if I recall correctly, to insure it never creates a negative room pressure for the burner. The cold air returns and heat ducts are another issue in themselves; we're discussing codes, not comfort, so they're not incuded in my details here. Basically you have to be certain that the burner can get enough air that it never starves for oxygen, thus letting CO flow into the room. And that of course DOES take into account where it's pulling its cold air returns from. Usually it's most easily solved by using a louvered door if the furnace is enclosed, and locating it where there is an ability to pull in outside air if it should need it (as most furnaces are specced for). Electric heat of course is another entirely different animal and much less complex in these areas, but the spacing requirements remain.
HTH
Pop
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I think you have to use thicker drywall 5/8" ? on the walls of the furnace room. Go to library and look at code books or go to HD and ger one of those code help books. Kevin
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