Finish for Front Door

We have a wood front door with a clear finish. The problem is that the finish won't stand up to sunlight. The bottom third of the door gets sunlight but the top two thirds is shaded by the porch roof. About every three years or so we have to strip the door and reapply the finish because the lower third had discolored. We'd like to find a clear finish that will stand up better to ultraviolet. We're in the process of going through the refinishing process once again and are searching for a clear finish that's better than all of the ones we've used in the past. Lowe's has a finish that claims to have 100% more UV blocker but I'm suspecting even that may not be much better.
Has anyone found a clear finish that stands above the rest when it comes to exposure to sunlight?
Harry
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On Thu, 27 Apr 2006 08:09:18 -0500, "HarryS"

pigment. The less pigment, the less block.
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Glass doesn't break down in sunlight, so pigment doesn't have to be a requirement for to stand up to UV exposure. There must be some kind of clear finish that can be applied that won't break down when exposed to the elements.
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An interesting theory, but the available product lines seem to include nothing that will last for more than about 4 years.
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I used to refinish doors at a cost of 500 - 1500 Ive seen the doors Ive done in the 80s -90s, they are still holding up after using Pratt and Lambert Marine Varnish an 80$-90$ a gallon varnish, you can buy in quarts cheaper. Whatever you use it must be a Marine product and not aplied on a hot surface, do it after the sun passes on bare wood.
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Were these doors definitely receiving direct sunlight for a substantial portion of the day? If so, this must be an exceptional finish and worth looking into.
Harry

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Yes direct sun, South exposure, on churches, universities, a Frank Loyd Right and other high quality homes in the chicago area ive done. 750 was a usual base cost for a trashed out old Oak or Walnut door. Unlesss it is a Marine product, forget it. The key issue is it must have flexibility and UV stability, Polys are to hard, possibly even Marine Poly. Contact a high quality boat maker, boat service yard, or boating supply that handles wood boats, not just fiberglass at a local shop. Aplication is critical as wood needs to be bare, cool, and not to be heated in direct sun for many hours, often evening is best after sun has passed for aplication. Sure you pay for P&L, but a quart can do most doors and more than pay you back in its longevity.
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