Find out how to cut pieces from sheets with minimal waste.

If youve ever cut pieces from glass, metal or drywall sheets you probably puzzled over finding a way to cut all required pieces from standard-sized sheets. If you cannot cut all pieces from one sheet you should now how many sheets you need to accomplish your project. Probably you've experienced a situation when you visited a local store to buy a sheet of one size but it was sold out and you had to get another size. How did you figure out how many sheets to buy?
This task is not easy even for experienced workers and therefore using special optimization software called "nesting" is a common practice.
There are tens of nesting software packages available for desktop computers that work well and help people to minimize waste of expensive materials and reduce the complexity of the sheet cutting tasks.
The only weak point of the existing nesting software packages is ability to work only on desktop computers or laptops. But the most sheet cutting tasks appear and have to be solved right at your workplace where you cannot use a desktop computer or a laptop.
Optimalon Software decided to bring the nesting software right where it's most wanted - at your jobsite. We've combined the latest mobile technologies and new robust state-of-art optimization algorithms into our new product - GNCutter. GNCutter designed for Pocket PC or Smartphones that you already carry with you everywhere. It gives you the ability to solve sheet cutting tasks no matter where you are!
You will never get in the trouble when a store doesn't have the required sheet size. You can easily specify all pieces you need to cut in GNCutter and select the sheet size that results in minimal waste of material and your money.
You can freely download GNCutter from Optimalon Software's website at URL: http://www.optimalon.com/product_gncutter.htm and run it on your mobile device. You can solve your real-world sheet cutting tasks or play with the examples provided by Optimalon Software.
-- Denis Smirnov Optimalon Software http://www.optimalon.com
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Why does anyone need software to cut pieces of anything? Isn't that what a tape measure does?
I know, I am replying to a spammer !!!! Your so called "free" software probably expires after a week and costs $1000 to purchase. I'll stick to my tape measure !!!
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On Tue, 27 Jun 2006 20:04:44 -0400, Denis Smirnov

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snipped-for-privacy@UNLISTED.com wrote:

I was curious (and bored) so I looked...30 day free trial, $97 license fee (intro offer, it says, doesn't say what after that nor how long an intro period). I didn't try to evaluate the product to see what it can/can't do nor how well it works.
As for why, only if one is doing a large number of sheets or a _very_ expensive piece of sheet goods does an optimal solution probably have much chance of saving anything signficant over a non-optimal solution. For the casual homeowner/handyman, probably no need. If one were building a bunch of tract houses of the same plan (and it didn't use even dimensions, which would be stupid, but...) one could foreesee perhaps making a difference. The obvious application is, of course, production facilitis such as cabinet manufacturing where they run thousands of pieces of various sizes in a near continuous production but in batches of various sizes.
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Thank you for checking out our website!
You're absolute right about the purpose of GNCutter, but let me show several others that can be helpful for every handyman.
Let's say you need to cut several pieces of glass from standard-sized glass sheets that you have. The straightforward solution would be to cut each piece from one sheets that results in a huge waste of material, money, time and efforts. I guess nobody uses this way. The most realistic solution would be trying to cut as much pieces as possible from one sheet and then cut the rest from another and so on. If you had a big experience in this area you probably could do it by yourself. But the most of people don't have such experience and they wouldn't be able to find even near-optimal solution. As a result instead of, for example, three sheets they need to cut five.
Is there a difference between cutting three sheets and cutting five sheets? I think so. While the material waste is not a big deal in a home repair, but the amount of work is, because you make each cut by hands and each cut matters. When you cut the same number of pieces from five sheets you make longer cuts than you would do for three sheets, and therefore the chance of braking glass down is higher.
Using our software you can easily and instantly get idea about where to cut and how many sheets to use. We hope it would be interested for any handyman at least to download and play with it. I guarantee you will enjoy it.
-- Denis Smirnov Optimalon Software http://www.optimalon.com
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Denis Smirnov (use info as user name) wrote:

...
For most of the folks here, the optimal solution is to call the dimensions needed into a glass shop and go pick them up paying for the glass used... :)
The basic problem is you're spamming a newsgroup of amateurs and homewners (for the most part) w/ a product whose target audience would far better be commercial small manufacturers or at least professionals who actually do such things routinely.
An individual could find the trial use of some value on the rare occasion, but probably you would get no sales from that kind of thing...
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Thank you very much for the reply, probably I was not clear in my original posting, but I would like to give you more explanations.

Let's assume you have a glass sheet of 24 x 36 in and you need to cut five pieces from it: 1: 11 x 6 in, 2: 7 x 8 in, 3: 12 x 22 in, 4: 13 x 14 in, 5: 17 x 11 in.
The first task you need to accomplish is to arrange all five pieces to fit the sheet size. Then you have to figure out where to make a first cut, then where to make a second cut and so on. For glass cutting the problem is a little bit complicated because you can cut only from one side completely to another and you should take in account this.
After you have a plan you will use a tape measure to place a cutting tool on a position according to the plan and make a cut.
For the example above GNCutter found a way to cut all parts from one glass sheet using 7 cuts. I spend only 1 minute to specify all pieces and perform calculation.

Actually it's not free software, I didn't state it in the original message. I said you could download it for free without any registration or obligations. It will work for 30 days that we assumed is enough to estimate at it's true worth.
You'll be surprised, but GNCutter costs only $97.

And I agree with you! You should! GNCutter is a different tool that works with perfect conjunction with a tape measure.
Should you have any further question I would be glad to give you more details.
-- Denis Smirnov Optimalon Software http://www.optimalon.com
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If I was doing non-repetitive production work (like 50 different custom windows in a row), I could maybe see the use of a CAD program like that. The program sounds like it would be great for a custom cabinet shop, that needs to minimize waste from expensive veneer plywood. But, having said that, for the occasional project like most of us on here would do, a pad of graph paper and a pair of scissors accomplishes the same thing for about a buck. Draw the raw stock to scale on one sheet, cut out scale templates of the finished peices needed from the other, and trial and error till you get the best fit. I've laid out warehouses and offices that way for years. Crude but effective, and cheap.
aem sends...
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