Finally an alternative to incandescents?

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I've been interested in finding a more acceptable solution to indoor lighting than the usual spiral CFLs for a while now, yesterday I was researching LED light bulbs as I was actually repairing an outdoor post light (and am trying a 4W LED in it, although I don't think it's bright enough for the application) and found this:
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Philips-10-Watt-60W-LED-A19-Soft-White-2700K-Light-Bulb-E-L-Prize-Award-Winner-423244/203285540#BVRRWidgetID
which is available at select (read: almost none) Home Depots but the secret is that if you can find them, they're apparently subsidized by local utilities or something to about $15 apiece, not the $50 listed on the web site. A store about 50 miles away from me had a stock of them however and I have a friend who works in that area so I imposed on him to get me a couple.
I have a feeling I need more of these. They have a CRI of 92 (normal CFLs and most LEDs are in the 70-80 range) Surprisingly, HD does not even mention CRI at all in their description of this product although to me it's a bigger deal than the efficiency. However if you research the L-prize you'll find that a CRI of >90 was one of the conditions. They also turn on instantly, and are actually bright. Well, almost instantly - there's a very brief but noticable delay between flipping the switch and getting light. It's really the one way you can tell that you're not turning on an incandescent bulb but something more complicated and electronic. I remember when we didn't try to skimp on light bulb size and actually lit up a room, but since switching to CFLs it's hard to get enough light in some spaces. Two of these 10W bulbs are definitely brighter than the single 40W CFL with which I was trying to light up a difficult room (dark paneling, main lighting from a torchiere with a dark colored shade that reflects most of the light up, would have been acceptable with a 200+ watt 3-way incandescent which is what it was obviously designed for, but nothing else produced acceptable light) and there's none of that annoying brightness ramp-up that you get from CFLs.
One thing that I have not tested with these bulbs is dimming ability. Supposedly it works, but some dimmers will buzz and hum. But if you don't have dimmers, don't have fully enclosed light fixtures, and don't mind (or can't see in your application) the odd shape/color of the bulb when unlit, there's really nothing at all I can find fault with.
Best part - this bulb is actually assembled in the USA, and apparently the LEDs used are made in the USA as well!
This may be old news for some as apparently they've been available @ HD at the discounted price for about a month now, but I figured this was worth posting because a) I don't go into HD that often and b) even if I did, none of the stores local to me carry this bulb so if I hadn't gone looking for it online I would not have known that it was actually available (and if someone hadn't mentioned to check the price, the $50 price listed on HD's web site would have put me off...)
Hope this helps someone...
nate
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On 04/26/2013 07:00 AM, Nate Nagel wrote:

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Philips-10-Watt-60W-LED-A19-Soft-White-2700K-Light-Bulb-E-L-Prize-Award-Winner-423244/203285540#BVRRWidgetID

Forgot to add... the really amusing thing about this bulb is the packaging. Philips hits a home run with this product which will likely primarily appeal to eco-weenies and people who actually geek out over things like light bulbs... and yet the packaging is that awful heat sealed clamshell plastic, and about 3x as large as it needs to be. I can't imagine any packaging more annoying, or, here's the ironic bit, less eco-friendly...
nate
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On 4/26/2013 7:05 AM, Nate Nagel wrote:

You can thank the democrats for today's clam-shell packaging. You see, lazy Democrats are used to free government handouts like free cell phones, free housing and of course the WIC program. But the government has failed them a bit. There is no free light bulb program so the lazy democraps have to go to Lowes Depot and steal them.
Maybe we need a USF type fund for light bulbs?
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The only LED I got were two or five watts, from Ebay. Didn't like the color spread. I use one of the two watt floods, with a desk lamp. Shine it on the ceiling of my bathroom. It replaces two eaches 7 watt filament bulbs. I'm saving enough on my electric to... not much. . Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .
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I'm still happy with my new LED "bulbs." I like old incandescents. (in
fact, I saw on the shelf at the Orange Colored Store, which I stopped at
last night to buy a socket extender, some incandescent bulbs with vintage-styled envelopes and filament configurations. Was tempted to grab a couple, but don't know what I would do with them.) But before you think I'm a fluorescent hater, I still have an old Dazor desk lamp with some full-spectrum tubes in it that I still use as, well, a desk lamp... That old magnetic ballast is kind of loud, but because I'm a sucker for vintage and it's a heavy, quality-made piece, I keep it around. When it dies (if it does before I do) I'll look into retrofitting an electronic ballast and reworking the switch appropriately...
nate
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On 4/26/2013 7:05 AM, Nate Nagel wrote:

Well, the plastic and cardboard are recyclable for those who care about that sort of thing.
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On 04/26/2013 10:50 AM, willshak wrote:

Yabbut what would be so wrong with a simple folded cardboard box like regular old light bulbs have been sold in for ages? We've been recycling paper for a lot longer than we've been doing plastic, and not all areas have plastic recycling.
nate
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On 4/26/2013 11:22 AM, Nate Nagel wrote:

I think it has a lot to do with the $50 price.
I know a lot of contributors here don't like them but, cfls work fine for me. Anyplace I need instant-on I've still got all my old incandescents or T8s.
It's funny to watch you guys get all huffy over light bulbs.:)
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On 4/26/2013 7:05 AM, Nate Nagel wrote:

I guess if you're paying $50 for a light bulb you want first class packaging.
Anybody that does the math will know that CFL's are most cost efficient.
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Frank wrote:

You flubbed your math then.
Assumptions:
40W equivalent lamps (what I have data handy for) Power $0.10/kWh Incandescent lamp $1 CFL lamp $3 LED lamp $10 (the $50 Phillips may be the latest, greatest, but most LEDs are a lot less expensive)
Incandescent: $1 lamp, 750hr life, 40W power consumption = $0.0053 per hour ($1/750)+((40/1000)*$0.10)
CFL: $3 lamp, 8,000hr life, 14W power consumption = $0.0018 per hour ($3/8000)+((14/1000)*$0.10)
LED: $10 lamp, 30,000hr life, 7.5W power consumption = $0.0011 per hour ($10/30000)+((7.5/1000)*$0.10)
So LED lamps are about 20% cheaper than CFL
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On 4/26/2013 12:24 PM, Pete C. wrote:

I did not do the math but the Phillips lamp, and that's what I addressed, is 10 watts and costs $50. I'm not taking time to do math again. You can do it but off hand I'll bet its more expensive. I'd buy the 60 watt equivalent $10 LED bulb if I knew where to get it.
Slight change in subject but I think home lighting requirements only takes up about 14% of your total electric bill so improved lights are just chasing diminishing return on investment.
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On 04/26/2013 02:00 PM, Frank wrote:

The Cree 9.5W/800 lumen (advertised as "60W equivalent" although this seems to be a little reminiscent of CFL advertising where you give up 50-100 lumens relative to a traditional incandescent) ones apparently are readily available in the HD stores that aren't selling the Philips L-Prize bulbs. The Cree ones are $13 in my area and I apparently wouldn't have any trouble getting them. I specifically sought out the Philips bulbs because of the higher CRI and the "made in the USA" factor, and the $2 difference (everywhere that I've actually been able to find them for sale, they're $15 not $50; online at Amazon now, if you're not close to a store selling them, they're about $30 BTW) isn't going to kill me. The higher light output and greater efficiency is nice too.
Not that Cree makes a bad product - as I said in a previous post, there are applications where it might make sense to use them, e.g. where the bulb is exposed and you are trying to maintain the appearance of a traditional frosted bulb. I've got several flashlights using Cree LEDs and they're great; I think I've replaced one pair of batteries in one of three flashlights after several years of ownership and use (and all are still working fine.) If the Philips didn't exist I'd probably be trying a few of the Cree bulbs now.
As an aside, Cree is apparently where it's at for can lights now. They have several models of downlights with a CRI of 90 or greater but for whatever reason their "light bulbs" have a lower CRI. So Philips for bulbs, but Cree for can lights.

I didn't even bother to fact check that statement but keep in mind that going from incandescent to CFL or LED will reduce the heat load on your A/C as well, if you live in an area that requires primarily cooling rather than heating (and I do)
Also, is that 14% assuming incandescents or CFLs? If the latter, then using incandescents would change lighting to a significant fraction of the total power used.
nate
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On 4/26/2013 2:35 PM, Nate Nagel wrote:

Number found here:
http://www.eia.gov/emeu/lighting/execsum.html
is 9.4% for lighting and that is pre-cfl even.
I love the LED flashlights too. Believe I have 2 of the three watt Crees.
I bought two HD TV's last year, one LCD and one LED. Difference is the lighting as what are called LCD's use cfl lighting where LED set has LCD screen but lighting is LCD. The LED set runs noticeably cooler. Don't know the wattage difference.
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FLASHLIGHTS!!!!
http://www.disney.co.uk/muppets/cms_res/images/download_pics/wallpapers/a nimal-wallpaper-1600x1200.jpg
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .
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I love the LED flashlights too. Believe I have 2 of the three watt Crees.
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My most used, is a Minimag with a 1 watt Teralux conversion. I use it many times a day. . Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .
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I love the LED flashlights too. Believe I have 2 of the three watt Crees.
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On 04/27/2013 09:28 PM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

I dunno if Lowe's still has them but they used to have a 2-C cell "Task Force" brand light with a 3W Cree emitter. Sucker is bright, I think in the 130-150 lumen range, about $30 - I bought a couple of them and still use them. I think I've only replaced the batteries in one of them in fact.
technology is catching up though - just yesterday I bought two Fenix brand flashlights @ REI for about the same price - they're tiny little keychain suckers and almost as bright. Model number for the smaller was LD-01, that one is going in the glovebox of my car (specifically sought out that model because it has a dedicated flashlight holder clip for a particular model flashlight that a) wasn't very good and b) is no longer made anyway) the larger E-11 is slightly brighter but still small enough to carry in a pocket unobtrusively.
Another example of really cool technology - if you told me 10 years ago that someday I'd be carrying a flashlight in my pocket that was about the same size as a mini mag lite but put out 100+ lumens I'd have laughed at you. Or even that one *could* carry an actual, useful flashlight in one's pocket and for a reasonable cost. But here we are!
nate
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wrote:

IFF you believe the absurd claims of 30K Hrs.
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snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

Every other LED I've use over the last 40 years or so has lasted a whole lot longer than 30,000 hours. 30k is a conservative estimate for warranty purposes, most will last a lot longer. When was the last time you had an LED burn out on some device where it is on 24x365?
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Not sure that's the right comparison. The typical LED, used for example as an indicator on a stereo or PC, is just that, an LED and a very low power one at that. To make an LED bulb, you have to have not only a much higher power LED, but also a power supply that has to fit in the form factor of a bulb. Combine all that with the need to try to keep the cost down, how flimsy many of the CFLs and other crap is that's built in China is, etc, and I'm a bit more cautious.
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wrote:

More bullshit. You don't have 40YO high power LEDs.

Bullshit. How many people will return these things for replacement? How many return their pressure treated wood?
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For both LED and CFL, the main failue mechanism is the electronics that are used to change the 120V to the higher, or lower, voltage that these lamps actually use.... The light source themselves are very long lived. The electronics are not. A power spike that an incandescent can ignore can easily wipe out the high voltage inverter in the CFL base, or the current limiting capacitor and reverse diode in the LED base.
You have to look at the entire assembly, and not just what the manufactures publishes as "lamp life"..... You will NEVER get the claimed numbers if you live in a place where there are power outages, thunderstorms, or higher temperatures....
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