Filling cracks in exposed gable rafter tail scarfs

I just had my house reroofed, and part of the work involved repairing various areas of dry rot. That included repairs to 3 of the gable rafters. It entailed cutting back the rafter tails and scarfing on (at about a 45 degree angle) about 2 feet of redwood 2x6 to form the new rafter tails. They seem to have done a good job (they used Gorilla Glue and did some toenailing for the joins), but they didn't fill the joins with glue and there's a lot of open cracks that are up to around 1/8 inch wide. I want to fill those cracks and then prime and paint. I'm wondering what material to use to fill those cracks. Of course, I want the join to be very smooth and undetectable and after priming and painting I want them to continue to look great indefinitely. Can I get suggestions for what to use? Thanks!
Dan
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about right. If the rafters don't get harsh temperature swings, you could also try Bondo- much more sandable than epoxy.
aem sends...
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On Mon, 07 Nov 2005 01:40:06 GMT, "ameijers"
:
: :> I just had my house reroofed, and part of the work involved repairing :> various areas of dry rot. That included repairs to 3 of the gable :> rafters. It entailed cutting back the rafter tails and scarfing on (at :> about a 45 degree angle) about 2 feet of redwood 2x6 to form the new :> rafter tails. They seem to have done a good job (they used Gorilla Glue :> and did some toenailing for the joins), but they didn't fill the joins :> with glue and there's a lot of open cracks that are up to around 1/8 :> inch wide. I want to fill those cracks and then prime and paint. I'm :> wondering what material to use to fill those cracks. Of course, I want :> the join to be very smooth and undetectable and after priming and :> painting I want them to continue to look great indefinitely. Can I get :> suggestions for what to use? Thanks!:> :That epoxy filler stuff they sell for window sills and porch posts sounds :about right. If the rafters don't get harsh temperature swings, you could :also try Bondo- much more sandable than epoxy. : :aem sends...
Thanks. I have some of that epoxy sill stuff from 2-3 years ago when I repaired 3-4 bad sills. I also have some Bondo or equivalent. The temperatures around here are fairly moderate. Lows never get below the upper 20's, and only go below around 30-32 maybe once a decade. It never snows, for instance. High temperatures are also rather moderate. Days in the 90's number in the single digits, on average. Over 100 would be a once in 3-5 year event. Maybe I'll try the Bondo, but like I say, I have both. Maybe I'll do the exposed parts (exposed to rain and sun) with epoxy and the unexposed parts with Bondo.
Dan
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DO NOT USE Bondo in this application!
been there, done that..............Bondo is not compatible w/ redwood.
I repaired a number of south facing redwood window sills (~ six sills) (southern California, ~15 to 20 inches of rain, no freezing) with Bondo & then painted w/ a high quality primer & oil base paint.
The results lookes fantastic!!!!.......for about a year or two. Now 15 years later, sills are just as messed up as be I restored them :(
I did remaing sills (~12) a few months later, same process except I used Abatron Wood Epox instead of Bondo, the sills are still in great shape, need some minor sanding & repainting
http://www.abatron.com/home002.htm
or
http://www.smithandcompany.org /
Both companies make quality products, I used both. Their stuff is not cheap but if you value your time, use it.
Both sell mail order, Smith may have a local desrtibutor in your area & you might save some on shipping.
cheers Bob
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:DO NOT USE Bondo in this application! : : :been there, done that..............Bondo is not compatible w/ redwood.
Oh, geez, too late! Yesterday it was threatening rain and I got the idea I better get something in there or the cracks would be filled with water, which would prevent anything from working. So, I quickly grabbed my Bondo-like fibre glass polyester product (Evercoat Home Fix Super Strength Universal REpair Filler) and mixed up about 2 tablespoons with hardener and slathered it into the cracks. It rained a lot last night. I sort of doubt that the stuff has set up very hard yet, and I could take a putty knife and scrape most of it out, but obviously can't get the cracks clean. I have some P.C. Woody 2-part wood epoxy paste I could use.
Dan : :I repaired a number of south facing redwood window sills (~ six sills) :(southern California, ~15 to 20 inches of rain, no freezing) with Bondo :& then painted w/ a high quality primer & oil base paint. : : :The results lookes fantastic!!!!.......for about a year or two. :Now 15 years later, sills are just as messed up as be I restored them ::( : :I did remaing sills (~12) a few months later, same process except I :used Abatron Wood Epox instead of Bondo, the sills are still in great :shape, need some minor sanding & repainting : : :http://www.abatron.com/home002.htm : :or : :http://www.smithandcompany.org / : : :Both companies make quality products, I used both. :Their stuff is not cheap but if you value your time, use it. : :Both sell mail order, Smith may have a local desrtibutor in your area & :you might save some on shipping. : :cheers :Bob
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