Filling a swimming pool


From time to time I have to refill my swimming pool due to evaporation.
Sometimes when I know a big storm is coming I will open the drain and let it drain an additional 8" and I will fill it back up to the proper level after the storm passes.
I have always used the garden hose to do that and just turn on the water.
I also have a well pump that is hooked up to the sprinkler system. On the well pump is a spigot, I never used it, but I could connect the garden hose to it, turn the valve off to the sprinkler line and use the well water to fill the pool.
I will save on the water bill...but I will pay more for the electric consumption to run the pool. I am not sure which one yields more cost savings.
My pool is 25000 gallons. It's depth varies from 3 to 9 feet so I would assume an average depth of 6 feet, so on average, to fill one inch of my pool is around 350 gallons. To fill 10 inches is 3500 gallons.
I don't know if it matters, just more or less curious. I guess my well water would also be harder with more minerals.
MC
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On Oct 10, 4:07�pm, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

do you have a sewer? or septic?
electric to run pump should be much cheaper than water bill
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On Oct 10, 3:07 pm, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Where do you live? Water is pretty cheap here in the great lakes. In fact till some time in the 70's to 80's water was free in many towns and Chicago. Now I guess the whole country gets a water bills. I guess you could run the pump for a minute and take a reading from your electric meter for that minute (assuming no other appliances go on in the house). Then you would have to ask how many gallons got pumped in that minute. Then calculate the cost of the electricity per 1000 gallons or so. It would be a close call here as water is not very costly, but electricity is outrageous.
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As an aside, some older outdoor hoses use lead for strength. You might consider replacing your hose if it is older and get one made without lead.

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I did not know that .. Guess that is why some hoses came with lables stating something like you could use them for drinking water.
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On Oct 10, 4:07 pm, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Make sure you test the well water for pH, calcium hardness, total alkalinity and iron before using it. Depending on its composition it may change the pool water balance ie water may cloud over and/or iron, if present, may oxidize.
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On Oct 10, 3:07 pm, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Talk to the water co, my rate is less the more I use.
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Fill two buckets with water - one from the well, one from the city. Let them sit out for a warm month and see what grows in them. My shallow well water grows huge amounts of algae.
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As others have stated, it depends on the costs in your area. A cubic foot of water contains 7.48 galons, and weighs 62.5 pounds, if memory serves. You can calculate the fill for the pool that way. How many cubic feet?
One thing not to do, ask the fire department to fill the pool. Many water mains have a bunch of rust in them. The sudden rush of water stirs up the rust, and turns the pool brown. Not good.
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In my town the water bills include a sewer charge equal to the water charge. When filling a pool they will forgo the sewer charge according to the pool's size.
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For pool owners who always seem to be worrying about the'Ph' of their pools. Rain water may be acidic due to pollution; although higher acidity may inhibit growth of algae etc. Here where we are to the east of North American industrial areas we do get acid rain and also snow. Outside pools are uncommon due to low seasonal temperatures. Here for a regular single family domestic dwelling we presently pay a twice yearly flat charge for water and sewer service, regardless of amount of usage. Although that may change. The cost at the moment is roughly $21 per month.
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On Sat, 11 Oct 2008 08:12:08 -0700 (PDT), terry

All rain is somewhat acid, because of the CO2 in the air
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Here for a regular single family domestic dwelling we presently pay a twice yearly flat charge for water and sewer service, regardless of amount of usage. Although that may change. The cost at the moment is roughly $21 per month.
*************************************
Cheap compared to here. Our minimum is $110 per quarter.
Filling pools can be done by a commercial water truck too. I'm not sure of the cost but it is a couple of hundred bucks from what my neighbor told me.
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wrote in message

Typically $200 per 6000 gallon truckload, with full charge for the last truck even if you only need a portion of it.
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