Fertilizing rocky soil where it's half soil half stones (and no dirt)

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Danny D. wrote:

why spend money on a nutrient poor and expensive item when you have tons of more nutritionally complex material available for free?
food is for eating, don't waste it.
songbird
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On Fri, 9 Sep 2016 08:20:08 -0400, songbird wrote:

It's more of a science project than a commercial venture.
For example, I found out that mixing in baking flour might not be the best solution because it has a lot of amylopectin, which, I'm told, will just form a hard "clay" like substance in the soil.
I do plan on mixing in some bottom-of-the-pile wood-chip detritus and maybe even some under-oak leaf rakings, which, I'm told, will contain zillions of fibers from fungi, which help by allowing better water penetration and adsorption (on the fungi fibers) and with good bacterial action (such as nitrogen fixing).
I might even throw in some Guadalupe manure from San Jose residents' poop, but it might be easier to use non-coal wood-original charcoal ground up to add to the existing "dirt" to make my own "terra preta": https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terra_preta
Apparently charcoal has an immense surface area, acres of surface area, in fact, in a single handful of soil (I'm told), which aids in the adsorption of water and associated dissolved nutrients. http://www.nakedwhiz.com/lumpindexpage.htm
In addition, I'm told, I can add calcium carbonate, which also helps in the adsorption of moisture in this otherwise dry soil.
Of course, considering what I'm starting with, it won't be easy by any means, but, it should be doable if I think it all the way through.
Here is the "rock" I'm starting with, before it weathers to "stone" and then eventually layers into "soil" before I displaced into my "dirt"...
http://i.cubeupload.com/BLWg5f.jpg
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On Thursday, September 8, 2016 at 6:33:42 PM UTC-4, Danny D. wrote:

Flour is way, way, way too processed to be of any use. Besides, when the water hits it, it make paste and will harden up.
Cindy Hamilton
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On Fri, 9 Sep 2016 10:02:45 -0700 (PDT), Cindy Hamilton wrote:

I belatedly agree wholeheartedly with you. The flour will basically turn the soil to "stone".
I have worked with some of the locals to come up with a "plan" to convert the soil into home-made potting soil.
This is what we start with, which is 30-million year old beds of sediment from the ocean bottom which have been shoved onto the continent via the wonders of plate tectonics:
http://i.cubeupload.com/BLWg5f.jpg
I can dig a thousand foot hole, and it would still be "this stuff":
http://i.cubeupload.com/9Ssf42.jpg
So I dig it out of the ravines, where it collects as "top soil":
http://i.cubeupload.com/ixJt7h.jpg
Given that organics are so powerful (complex, but powerful), my new plan is to add fungus-filled leaf rakings from either underneath the oak trees or at the bottom of the wood-chip piles dotting my yard everywhere:
http://i.cubeupload.com/3cudHY.jpg
I may even burn some of this spare wood "chunks" into charcoal, which apparently has "acres" of surface area per handful!
http://i.cubeupload.com/8bCVNf.jpg
That way, I can make my own "terra preta": https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terra_preta
In addition, I'm told, I can add calcium via some of my readily available pool chemicals, which also helps in the adsorption of moisture in this otherwise dry soil.
And, of course, I'm gonna need "fertilizer" of some sort.
Already two of the neighbors said I can have all the manure off their goat and alpaca filled property that I can handle!
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On Fri, 09 Sep 2016 13:30:54 -0700, Oren wrote:

The garden area is tiny. Maybe forty feet by fifteen feet is fenced off from the critters. But right now, we're just using five-gallon buckets of Costco detergent pails. :)

The flour was for adding "organics" but it fails upon closer inspection. Again, I have 50 pound bags of flour that the wife uses for baking. I guess I could use sugar. She has 25 pound bags of that stuff too.

She's mad at me because she planted her "babies" in that planter and nothing came of it. She cares very much about all her babies!
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On 9/9/2016 10:56 PM, Danny D. wrote:

Why would you put flour in the garden soil?
--
Maggie

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wrote:

+1
If I wanted to teach the kids I would fill several of the 5 gallon bucket with his dirt then...
#1. plant seeds, water regularly
#2. plant seeds, sprinkle a little time release fertilizer on top, water regularly
#3. stir in peat moss, plant seeds, water regularly
#4. same as #3 + time release fertilizer
etc.
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On Tue, 6 Sep 2016 09:41:51 -0000 (UTC), Danny D. wrote:

Ya gotta add stuff! "https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terra_preta " "https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USDA_soil_taxonomy " "https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soil_classification " "http://www.instructables.com/id/Make-Your-Own-Charcoal-at-Home-Video /" "https://www.google.com/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&ion=1&espv=2&ie=UTF-8#safe=off&q=building+perfect+soil "
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