Fertilizing rocky soil where it's half soil half stones (and no dirt)

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It cuz yer close to a large body of water! Duh.
I lived in the Try-Valley (Ptown/Livermore) and commuted to to Santa Clara for over 15 yrs. It was always 10 degrees hotter, "over the hill" (Fremont Grade), than in the SFBA proper.
The "marine layer" comes in, at night, and cools everything. UNLESS! ....there's a "high pressure" center over the SFBA. Then, the prevailing winds all move from onshore to offshore, giving us those dreaded "hot spells".
I usta have a link to a SFBA wind map, but it appears that has been shut down. OTOH, I no longer suffer from these problems cuz I moved to the CO Rockies. :)
nb
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It depends on _which_ hills you're up on, and on the current marine layer height. If you're up off quimby or mt hamilton road, it's likely warmer in the summer than downtown. On the coast range side, it varies, but consider that Los Gatos is frequently 5 to 10 degrees warmer than downtown SJC.
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On Wed, 07 Sep 2016 16:57:07 GMT, Scott Lurndal wrote:

If you can explain why it's cooler in the summer (even though I get about 4 more hours of sunlight than does San Jose, from about 6am to about 10am) and warmer in the winter (my BMW dings when I get down to the bottom and I can see frost on the grass on the bottom - where it's ten degrees colder).
Part of it must be due to having no shadow whatsoever (sun I have plenty of), but some of it must be due to the height and to the wind factors.
As for the geology of the soil, I don't want to pinpoint my exact location on the Internet (who knows what cuckoos lurk herein), but, suffice to say that anyone who knows the local geology can pinpoint me just as well as they pinpointed Osama Bin Laden from the Tora Bora background pictures.
Here's a picture I snapped today of the roadcut on my land:
http://i.cubeupload.com/9Ssf42.jpg
Notice that the "soil" is Franciscan "ribbon chert" for a thousand or more feet thick!
http://i.cubeupload.com/usBxQY.jpg
That's what I'm dealing with.
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Google "Inversion Layer".
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In Florida, we set out the tomato plants as soon as possible after there is no danger of frost; wait too long and no tomatos. Second crop can be set out in the fall.
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On Wed, 7 Sep 2016 13:30:02 -0400, dadiOH wrote:

Maybe the lack of frost is the issue. Thanks.
I can't completely blame the bees anyway, because the Kumquat trees bear fruit (and their flowers smell *great*!).
http://i.cubeupload.com/4ipGTd.jpg
Speaking of kumquats, I can't imagine this tree will survive, but it has been surviving for years (Costco tree).
http://i.cubeupload.com/al14Hi.jpg
There is almost zero bark left at the base. Dunno why.
But it lives.
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Danny D. wrote:

could be pollination or temperature or a mutation/hybrid which isn't very self-fertile.
some days when it's really hot i'll water the whole plant to make sure the flowers get dinged (pollinate themselves).
songbird
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On Tuesday, September 6, 2016 at 8:01:19 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Northern CA I believe, though IDT it was stated here.
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On Wed, 7 Sep 2016 03:00:58 -0700 (PDT), trader_4 wrote:

The wife seems to have no problem growing basil up here in northern california but *she* uses potting soil (which isn't the goal here).
Here, for example, is her basil:
http://i.cubeupload.com/CCjLxz.jpg
And, heh heh, I threw some leftover pepper seeds from a half-eaten pepper plant into her pot (she's says I am a cuckoo bird who plants seeds in other people's nests for them to take care of)...
http://i.cubeupload.com/3R6DYR.jpg
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Danny D. wrote: ...

likely very good reasons for that (grape vine roots can go pretty deep along with the abundant sunshine). grapes do poorly around here (too much fog/fungal diseases).
songbird
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You probably have a County agricultural agent. Try him/her for suggestions..
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On 9/6/16 4:41 AM, Danny D. wrote:

Why don't you know this stuff if you had a professor who said dirt and soil are different things? Too many years ago? A dozen roses in a corn field are a dozen weeds. A weed is any plant out of place.
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On Tue, 6 Sep 2016 21:42:05 -0500, Dean Hoffman wrote:

Heh heh ... I was in the numbers business, so to speak. All numbers. Very dry stuff.
But, I did take elective classes in college, one of which was a geology 101 class.
But, in geology, they cover plate tectonics and volcanoes and earthquake stuff.
Not the NPK, pH, and humus of soil samples.
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On Tue, 6 Sep 2016 21:42:05 -0500, Dean Hoffman wrote:

The way it works, technically, is that Rock is the big stuff that weathers to stones, which is the small stuff, and, over time, stones weather to "soil" which is a complex layered in-situ environment.
Once you displace that soil, then it becomes dirt. So, dirt is merely soil that is not in situ anymore.
There's an entire concurrent thread on this distinction over here: https://groups.google.com/forum /#!forum/alt.usage.english
The thread it titled: Dirt is now soil; rock is not stone https://groups.google.com/forum /#!topic/alt.usage.english/GvvXEfk9CyQ
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Sort of. The size - NOT composition - of the weathered rock determines its nomenclature... boulder>cobble>gravel>sand>silt>clay>colloid Colloquially, the last three would be "mud". I would characterize what you have as coarse soil.
The fact that composition does not enter into it means that "sand" can be ANY mineral, not just quartz.
If you want to get a better idea of the size ratio in what you have, put some of it in a glass jar, add 4-5 times as much water, stit it up and let it settle for a couple of days. The "rocks" and sand will be fairly obvious. If you want to get an idea of the silt - top layer - use a pipette or turkey baster to suck up a bit from the top layer and see how it feels between your teeth. Pretty gritty=coarse silt, gritty but not all that much=medium silt, barely gritty=fine silt.
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On Wed, 7 Sep 2016 13:50:10 -0400, dadiOH wrote:

That's a great description. I don't disagree that it's "course soil". At this point, since it's displaced, it's "course dirt". :)

I look at sand all the time under the microsope just for fun. The quartz is the light white stuff but there's darker reddish stuff and black stuff too.

Nice test! Stokes law.
I already have a Costco peaches jar ready to settle the issue once and for all!
http://i.cubeupload.com/w3Zx0D.jpg
Interestingly, there was a cloud of dust that the picture doesn't capture, but it was "smoking" with dust like it was the remains of a smouldering fire, so there must be plenty of very fine grains in there too!
http://i.cubeupload.com/8jU7HZ.jpg

Ug.
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Danny D. pretended :

Different meanings for different sciences. It pays also to consider that word usage is sort of like dictionary definitions. Both describe how words are being used and not necessarily how they *should* be used.
I would say that you would start with minerals and when several minerals are mixed together into a solid chunk it is rock no matter the size. Stone can be removed from a rock quarry and seems to imply that stone is serving some useful purpose as building material for instance. River rocks are often used in decorative building material, but it doesn't mean that they cease being rock just because they are used like stone.
I had heard that there is a progression from sands (clay, silt, sand) when dead boilogical material is added it is termed 'dirt' and when living biological material is added it becomes termed as 'soil', but then again different sciences may make different distinctions.
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On Wed, 07 Sep 2016 14:26:41 -0400, FromTheRafters wrote:

Rock -> stone -> sand -> mud -> clay -> and then back to rock via the metamorphic process of sand -> sandstone -> slate, etc.
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After serious thinking Danny D. wrote :

I was more referring to inorganic, organic(dead), organic(living), but yes there is a rock cycle of sorts. Even including minerals used by organisms falling to the ocean floor when they die and eventually becoming limestone. Nothing exists in a vacuum.
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On Wed, 07 Sep 2016 20:17:51 -0400, FromTheRafters wrote:

Speaking off "organic" dead plant material, do people ever just sprinkle "flour" in the soil?
http://i.cubeupload.com/1m6HD9.jpg
Seems to me that 50-pound Costco bag of flour would be the perfect thing to give organically poor soil some readily available organics.
What do you think?
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