Fertilizing rocky soil where it's half soil half stones (and no dirt)

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On Wed, 7 Sep 2016 09:10:12 -0400, Frank wrote:

I have seen the wife sprinkle blue fertilizer beads on the *top* of the potted plants, where I think, "what good is it gonna do on top?" but she says it gets deep (I doubt it does so efficiently).
Hence, my plan is to mix the fertilizer throughout the soil. It should be easy to do. I just layer cake a few handfuls of soil plus a spoon of fertilizer, then a few more handfuls of soil and another spoon, and then I mix it all up and then put some more layers in until I can't mix it anymore because the bucket is about half full so I finish the job in a second bucket and then combine the tally.
Wouldn't *that* be better than sprinkling fertilizer on top and hoping it makes it to the bottom some day?
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Danny D. wrote: ...

water soluble. gravel/sandy soil water goes through it very easily. too easily in an arid climate.
if you are adding compost and other N bearing materials the fertilizer needs may not be that great.
and different plants need different amounts of N.
green peppers i have here don't need extra N and will not bear well while the red peppers do very well with more.
songbird
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On Wed, 7 Sep 2016 11:28:57 -0400, songbird wrote:

I sneak food scraps into the wife's potting soil when she's not looking, and these pepper plants grew, but no peppers came out of them yet (and it has been a few months).
http://i.cubeupload.com/3R6DYR.jpg
It seems almost *all* the food scraps grow infertile plants. I keep telling her that her bees aren't doing their job.
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Food scraps = NOT meat, I hope = are of no value to plants until they (the food scraps) decompose and that takes quite a while.
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On Wed, 7 Sep 2016 12:56:19 -0400, dadiOH wrote:

My mistake for not being clear. What I mean is that the tomato plant you see here was grown from a Costco tomato food scrap. I acted like a cuckoo bird by burying the tomato in the wife's basil pot with the full knowledge that I was making her feed my experiment.
http://i.cubeupload.com/Si8QN3.jpg
In very short order, she started remarking "Did you put something in my basil pot?" to which I avoided her gaze until I could no longer. She is still taking care of the tomato plant, even as it crowded out her basil.
But the darn thing has no tomatoes.
We don't know why. Are Costco tomatoes infertile? Or are the bees not doing their job?
I did the same with pepper food scraps:
http://i.cubeupload.com/3R6DYR.jpg
No peppers either.
Are food scraps infertile?
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Nope.

Bees pollinate the flower allowing the plant to form fruit. In the case of tomatoes, they are most commonly wind pollinated:
While tomato flowers are typically wind pollinated, and occasionally by bees, the lack of air movement or low insect numbers can inhibit the natural pollination process. In these situations, you may need to hand pollinate tomatoes to ensure pollination takes place so your tomato plants bear fruit.

Same deal with peppers.

Nope.
--
Dan Espen

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On Wednesday, September 7, 2016 at 5:14:42 PM UTC-4, Danny D. wrote:

Google is your friend. Really. Here's what turned up when I googled temperature tomatoes set fruit
Several conditions can cause tomatoes to not set fruit. Too much nitrogen f ertilizer, nighttime temperatures over 70 degrees F., low temperatures belo w 50 degrees F., irregular watering, insects such as thrips or planting the wrong variety may result in poor fruit set.
<http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/archives/parsons/vegetables/tomato.html

Peppers, like tomatoes, are sensitive to temperature. Most peppers will dro p their blooms when daytime temperatures get much above 90 degrees F. in co mbination with night temperatures above 75 degrees F. They will also drop t heir blooms in the early spring if temperatures remain cool for extended pe riods. Hot peppers, such as jalapenos, withstand hot weather fairly well an d can often produce fruit through the summer in most areas. Optimum tempera tures fall between 70 degrees and 80 degrees F. for bell-type peppers and b etween 70 degrees and 85 degrees F. for hot varieties.
<http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/archives/parsons/vegetables/pepper.html

Cindy Hamilton
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On Thu, 8 Sep 2016 10:10:53 -0700 (PDT), Cindy Hamilton wrote:

fertilizer, nighttime temperatures over 70 degrees F.,
It's probably the temperature then. Thanks.
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On Wednesday, September 7, 2016 at 12:09:18 PM UTC-4, Danny D. wrote:

Hybrids.
Cindy Hamilton
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On 09/07/2016 12:24 PM, Cindy Hamilton wrote: ...

Decent possibility although not necessarily...
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Danny D. wrote:

they take a while to get going sometimes. but can also be like what i say above. too much N, the plant doesn't produce as much other than green growth.

some plants need certain types of insects or conditions to be fertile. some need other plants (i.e. they are not self-fertile or do much better when crossed with a relative).
songbird
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If it is time release fertilizer it works because the fertilizer is encapsulated in water soluble beads; water from rain or sprinklers dissolve the beads - they dissolve at different rates - and the water carries the fertilizer downward.
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On Wed, 7 Sep 2016 12:53:57 -0400, dadiOH wrote:

That makes too much sense for a Usenet post! :)
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On Wednesday, September 7, 2016 at 10:19:58 AM UTC-4, Danny D. wrote:

If she waters from the top, the fertilizer dissolves slowly, providing a constant, small dose of its ingredients. Too much fertilizer will burn the plants, just like what happens when the dog always pees on the same patch of grass and kills it.
Cindy Hamilton
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On Wed, 7 Sep 2016 10:19:08 -0700 (PDT), Cindy Hamilton wrote:

Heh heh ... I like to pee outside. Makes me feel like I'm out in nature.
I had buried some leftover food waste spaghetti squash seeds in the wife's mint planter, which took over, but which seems to be resiliant to my attempt at fertilizing it with urine! :)
http://i.cubeupload.com/RrqvON.jpg
If only she knew ... she'd kill me!
PS: Only one spaghetti squash ever resulted, even though these things had beautiful male and female yellow flowers (mostly female it seemed). Again, I think the bees aren't doing their job.
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On Wednesday, September 7, 2016 at 10:19:58 AM UTC-4, Danny D. wrote:

When people apply fertilizer to a lawn, what do they do? Within a week, the lawn is greening up. What you put on top makes it to the roots fairly quickly.

Yes, you can mix it in, if you have that option. But I wouldn't waste fertilizer by mixing it into 50 lbs of soil and then filling pots with it where the roots won't get to the fertilizer at the bottom before most of it is watered out. Getting it into the first few inches would help.
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On Wed, 7 Sep 2016 15:50:08 -0700 (PDT), trader_4 wrote:

Fair enough. You can even see the stripes of darker green sometimes. So it must diffuse.

Fair enough.
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On 9/6/2016 2:41 AM, Danny D. wrote:

Start hauling in loads of horse manure. Check out Garrod Farms.
http://www.garrodfarms.com/
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Taxed and Spent wrote:

Did you know that horse manure can carry viable weed and grass seeds ? For that reason I will only use it after it's been "hot" composted . Cow manure on the other hand is safe to use "straight from the producer" due to the way their digestive system works .
--
Snag



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On 9/6/2016 9:26 AM, Terry Coombs wrote:

flies in the stable. Knew an organic farmer that would not use it.
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