Fernco coupling okay for underground sewer pipe?

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I am going to be replacing a small section of underground sewer pipe that runs from the front of my house toward the street. The existing underground sewer pipe is 4-inch cast iron. I will be using PVC to replace the line from the front of my house and connecting to that sewer line about 5 feet out.
Can I use a Fernco coupling to connect the new PVC to the old underground cast iron sewer pipe?
If not, how is that type of connection usually made?
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On 4/6/2011 9:23 AM, RogerT wrote:

That's how...
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I would check with manufacturer and local codes on this . My neighbor used one as you said a few years ago and it ripped when they filled the trench. He didnt know until his toilet started backing up a couple of days later. Dont know if that is a problem with using coupling underground or an installation problem. I think they may have disturbed the ground under the new pipe too much.
Jimmie
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ferncos are used here. in replacing the line its important to fill the trench with sand or gravel before placing line and get the slope right and the line properly supported along its entire length, and cover the new line the same as the bottom before backfilling espically if the line is extra deep, you dont want to drop big rocks on the new line.
kinda common sense things but lots of folks lack common sense:(
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I kind of leaned more toward a screw up as the most likely cause too. I bet if the OP googles bury Fernco he will get all the info he needs.
Jimmie
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OK I went ahead and goggled. Coupling should have a shear shield when buried . This is a stainless steel band that wraps around the coupling From the looks of things this come with the coupling and is not an add- on.
Jimmie
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JIMMIE wrote:

Thanks. I did try doing Google searches before posting, but I hadn't tried Googling for "bury Fernco". I too, did that after reading your first post, and that produced a lot of good information. I also saw some suggestions to use a shielded Fernco coupling.
I then went to http://www.fernco.com and http://www.fernco.com/plumbing/shielded-couplings to see what they look like and what they are for etc. I'm going to go back and do more reading at the main Fernco site because I saw lnks there for FAQ's, videos, etc.
Thanks.
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On Wed, 6 Apr 2011 08:30:09 -0700 (PDT), JIMMIE

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On Apr 6, 4:56pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

That's a really odd term as all flexible coupling joints are mechanical joints. The only term I've ever heard used for a shielded flexible coupling is shielded flexible coupling. ;)
http://www.fernco.com/plumbing/shielded-couplings http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/flexible-fittings/fittings/plumbing/ecatalog/N-a85Z1z0ytb9 and that's the ASTM term as well: http://www.astm.org/Standards/C1541.htm
R
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On Wed, 6 Apr 2011 15:31:48 -0700 (PDT), RicodJour

take a look at Metro Supply -- http://www.metrosupply.ca/catalog/519410 They list both the Fernco flex and MJ products.
Fernco calls them "Proflex" oand "sheilded couplings" as well on their website. Another Ferco product is the "strongback", as well as the "no hub".
All of these are generically referred to by all the plumbing supply houses around here as "MJ"s, and that's how I was introduced to them by my old plumber friend ED the first time I ran into an application where one was needed. He just said "call Marks' and ask them for an MJ for sizeX PVC to size Y copper"
Problem solved.
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On Apr 6, 6:51pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

My point was that using a local term and pronouncing it as the defacto standard term on a nationwide, or larger, stage, is of dubious benefit. Doubly so as you are in Canada and the OP is in the US.
R
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wrote:

protect it and give it some rigidity. Not sure of the size/adapter availability though.
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wrote:

ferncos are used here. in replacing the line its important to fill the trench with sand or gravel before placing line and get the slope right and the line properly supported along its entire length, and cover the new line the same as the bottom before backfilling espically if the line is extra deep, you dont want to drop big rocks on the new line.
kinda common sense things but lots of folks lack common sense:(
++++++++++
Thanks. I found this article which includes info on how to do the back filling after the new pipe goes in: http://www.cispi.org/handbook/chapter6.pdf .
And on one of the Google searches I did, someone wrote something similar about surrounding the pipe with sand or clean dirt in areas that are rocky to prevent sharp rocks from damaging the pipe.
So, what you wrote is correct and worth noting even if it is common sense.
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You could always put a larger diameter piece of solid plastic pipe around the Fernco to keep from damaging the Fernco. .
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RogerT wrote:

I installed two ferncos on a four inch ID concrete line about 10 years ago, and they are still holding up fine. The reason was to install a cleanout, as the existing one had been covered in concrete when the homeowner purchased the property.
I backfilled it with 3/4 minus, and then dirt making up to ground level. . No problems, and nothing has moved or shifted since installation.
Jon
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There is one that is code approved for concealed locations and burial. I always have to ask at the supply house to be sure I get the right one. I think it is the one with the full metal sleeve but you better ask some one in your area just to be safe.
Colbyt
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What do local codes say about your use of PVC in sewer run that is presently cast iron ?
Would there be a problem obtaining cast iron piping and patching whatever pipe has given way ?
Since you are already digging up the pipe why not replace the entire run, as it gets expensive to dig it up and repair it 4' at a time...
~~ Evan
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On Wed, 6 Apr 2011 16:13:49 -0700 (PDT), Evan

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On Apr 7, 12:17pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

That's crap... If that were the case any work done to the line would require its replacement with PVC...
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On Thu, 7 Apr 2011 13:20:07 -0700 (PDT), Evan

Well, if your house has cast iron sewer pipe and stack, MANY insurance companies will NOT write you a policy for new business without having it replaced. ANd any time sewer lines are replaced here they are NOT replaced with cast iron - not Transite (or cement) either. The only thing used around here is PLASTIC - both inside the house and underground.
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