Fence question

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I am planning to install a fence that will attach to brickwork at one end, but I am not sure what is the best way to attach it. The options I see are:
1. Use a regular 4x4 fence post attached to the wall;
2. Use a skinnier piece of wood attached to the wall;
(And in the two cases above, which is the best way to attach the wood to the brick wall? Adhesive or bolts/screws?)
3. Attach the recommended metal brackets directly to the brick wall -- presumably with bolts or screws.
Have I missed anything?
What are the pros and cons of each method?
Perce
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Corinne wrote:

Try a rephrase: "My neighbor has a side of his house that faces my backyard..."
If you paid half of the cost of the fence, which you should have done, you have an equal interest in the fence and can, I would think, paint it. Absent any financial interest, best not.
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Why should he have paid for part of the fence? If my neighbor puts up a fence, that is his business, not mine and I'll be damned if I'd pay a penny of it.
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Ask, if he says no, its no.
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If you have no intention to make use of the fence now or the future, then guess it doesn't make sense for you to spend $$$ on it. However if down the road you decide to build a fence in your back yard, you may want to attach it to his fence that's already up?
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

In some places, the rule is that if either neighbour wants a fence, they can put one up on the property line and force the other neighbour to pay for half the cost. The cost is based on a "basic" fence, ie the cheapest chainlink that can be found, and the nicer side, if there is one, must face the neighbour that didn't ask for it. Of course if the two parties are on speaking terms they can come to whatever agreeement suits them.
That's the way it works around here. Someone posted a legal term to this NG a while ago, something like "adverse benefit" or something. The idea is that the law recogizes a fence as a benefit to you even if you don't want it. Like airbags. Don't want them? Tough. Gotta have them, gotta pay for them.
I guess an implicit corollary is that the neighbour is permitted to set foot on the other property to put the fence up, too.

Chip C Toronto
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-> That's the way it works around here. Someone posted a legal term to -> this NG a while ago, something like "adverse benefit" or something. The -> idea is that the law recogizes a fence as a benefit to you even if you -> don't want it. Actually, in some cases a fence can be a bad thing. A police officer told my neighbor (when I lived in NC) that homes with privacy fences are more often the targets of burglars than homes with no fences or only chain link fences.
--
8^)~~~ Sue (remove the x to e-mail)
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Good point. I have not closed on this house yet, so I will find out of the seller paid for half.
Thanks.
Corinne

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Cut through the BS. Go to the neighbor. TELL him what you would like to do. ASK him if the fence is on HIS property, or if it is a property line common fence. ASK him if he has any preferences (you are going to paint it whatever color you want anyway), and IF he would like to share the cost or labor.
Maybe it will be a win/win deal where he was wanting to paint it anyway, and might spring for the paint/labor/both.
The direct approach should always be step one.
After that, you have to get devious ...................... ;-)
Steve
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Hey, keep out of this. If people actually start talking to their neighbors there will be no use for newsgroups and information on tree cutting and dog crap.
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Good advice Steve, and I would ask beforehand anyway.
I have never had a problem with a neighbor, and am closing on this home in three weeks. I am thinking ahead, and appreciate the advice.
Corinne

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wrote:
-> My neighbor has a fence and the back side faces my backyard. -> -> Can I paint it to match the color of my house, or do I need his -> permission first? -> -> Thanks. -> -> Corinne
I'd go ahead and paint it, but be absolutely sure that the paint stays on your side. You don't want his side to have paint dripping through the cracks. Frankly, I don't know how you could do it. Maybe someone here has painted one side of a fence.
Another idea would be to clean it and protect it with something like a deck/wood protector. That way it shouldn't look bad in a few years.
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Very sound advice. But if you are going to be neighbors, it is a good idea to go and talk to them about it. This is a way to get to know them before buying. You will know in advance whether they are good/bad.
Steve
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If you painted a fence and did not ask the owner then you would be liable for any damages. Including the cost of removing or repainting to the owners preference.

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Just an observation, but what a statement of how sad things have become that it was some time before anyone even SUGGESTED just asking the neighbour what they thought, and instead brought up legal points etc........
Yanno, if everyone was on just a LITTLE bit better terms with their neighbours, life would be easier. Where I live I know about 50% of the people on my street, and they know me. It comes in handy because then people keep an eye out for each other a little more. If you're new to the neighbourhood, introduce yourself around and be friendly. You just might be surprised at the reception you'd get.
I know, I know, I'm a dreamer........
Stevie Z
--
Buy the Ticket, Take the Ride - HST, RIP.





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No, you're not a dreamer; that works, and makes life good.
An ex-Chicagoan northwest, Belmont/Central
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Our fence is located completely on our property even though it is near the property line. We put it up, paid for it and we own the whole thing. As the others said you should ask.
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There is no good way. Yes, you can use anchors, and drill into the mortar or brick. BUT, brickwork is not known for its strength. Regular settling of the soil is enough to cause brick walls to crack, break, and fall. Holes where water can infiltrate and go through the freeze/thaw cycles are not a good thing. Unless done exactly right, it is incredibly easy to split a brick, or crack the mortar. And even if done right, there is a chance of cracking.
I would consider attaching it to the ground. Something like a square tube metal post sunk in concrete.
Unless it don't matter, or you are going to sell soon.
Steve
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On Thu, 22 Mar 2007 22:47:18 -0400, "Percival P. Cassidy"

I would try to attach it beyond the brick into wood or concrete with lag screws.
If you can dig deep enough (1/3 length of the post), I would also consider just using driveway chips (thin sliced stones) tamped around the post.
Regards Dale
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On Thu, 22 Mar 2007 22:47:18 -0400, "Percival P. Cassidy"

My 42 inch picket fence, built by a major fence company around here, Long Fence, with 3 locations in Baltimore and Washington, is not attached to the wall at all. The first post is right next to the wall and afaict inserted just the way the other posts are, and definitely not connected to the house. FWIW It has 4" diameter round posts. It hasn't moved in 28 years.

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