Fence posts with metal pipe last longer?

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I received a bid for a cedar mod panel fence for about $23 per foot with posts set in concrete. For 10% more, they would put a metal pipe inside the posts and set the pipe in concrete. This is supposed to last longer. Has anyone any experience with this? I have to decide whether this upgrade is worth it. Some of my old fence posts did break at the ground level due to moisture.
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Wood in contact with soil is the major cause of fence failure. Poor detailing that traps moisture & prevents the fence from drying is another significant cause.
So the metal pipe will help a lot IF the bottom of the post is not in contact with the soil.
If the bottom of the fence boards touch the soil, the will still be at risk for rot.
What size pipe? And do they use other design details that will avoid rot / termites & extend fence life?
An extra 10% seems pretty cheap to add a feature that will add a few years (at least) to the fence life.
cheers Bob
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wrote:

The answers are yes, no, definitely, and maybe. I love it when someone writes in here, and doesn't give a clue about what they are asking about or where they live.
Meaning ........... what part of the country is this in? You said some of them had rotted off, so I would ASS-U-ME that you live where rot is a consideration. I live in Nevada and Utah, and fence posts lasts for decades out in the worst of conditions.
I am a big fan of do it once, do it right. I would have the metal poles set in concrete with a small wash on every one. A wash is a rounded top to the concrete that keeps the water from pooling around the base of the pipe. Have the wash extend a couple of inches above the soil line.
Fence post failure is a big PITA because you have to take down a lot to change a fence post. And then you're back in the same position, .......... wood or steel?
Do it once, do it right.
YMMV. You might be rich and have a lot of money and it doesn't matter. If that's the case, please contact me at your earliest convenience as I have a bridge for sale, and it is priced very reasonably. No qualifying, either.
Steve ;-)
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I have not heard of the [metal pipe inside the wooden post] technique.
I would not build a wooden fence, in ANY area of our fine country, unless the posts were of steel and set properly in concrete. No wood posts or wood touching the ground PERIOD. Good luck.
--
:)
JR

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On Thu, 06 Mar 2008 15:57:25 -0600, Jim Redelfs

He's probably talking about a plastic fence. Ugh. But didn't bother to say that either.

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peter wrote:

And for 10% LESS they'd just use a metal post.
Why would you cover a metal post with a wood veneer? If the fence is oriented right, you won't see the posts anyway.
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theres a new kinda post, vinyl or plastic underground with metal pst that actual wood post sits on.
vinyl should last forever, galavanized metal post forever.
since the wood post never touches dirt it should last much longer too..........
this was on this old house
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You'll see them if like here, the posts must be in your own yard. That is so the good side faces the neighbors.
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RobertPatrick wrote:

Okay, I'll play. If I'm paying for the fence, WHY would I want the "good" side facing the neighbors?
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wrote:

I have occasionally wondered the same thing.
However, it is typical that the "good" side faces "out" from the newly fenced area. Chainlink, vinyl, wood, it doesn't matter - they "all" face out.
I suppose this is to improve the appearance of the fenced property when viewed from OUTSIDE the property.
--
:)
JR

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HeyBub wrote:

Because most places, that is what code requires?
aem sends...
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Because your town building code may tell you that is what you must do.
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on 3/7/2008 10:18 PM HeyBub said the following:

Like others have said, it may be code, it looks better when people look at your property, and it is neighbor friendly. You can comply with code, improve the appearance on both sides of the fence, and keep the neighbors happy, by using a fence that looks the same on both sides. IMHO, a chain link fence doesn't look good on either side.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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But they don't look BAD.
...and they are less expensive to install, require no maintenance and last virtually "forever".
--
:)
JR

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on 3/8/2008 11:22 AM Jim Redelfs said the following:

A chain link fence on a property line is a trespass preventing marker. It is unfriendly by saying, "This is mine. Do not pass". The only unfriendly chain link fence is one around an inground pool, other unsafe area, or an animal enclosure. A solid fence is a privacy fence, for both sides.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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Is this unique to chainlink fencing?

This "logic" certainly applies to a privacy fence: "This is mine. Do not pass and I don't even want you to SEE what's beyond."

All other chainlink fences are friendly?
Yours is an <ahem> INTERESTING outlook on fencing.
Most fencing is for a utilitarian purpose. The rest, surely a vast minority, is purely for asthetics. That, then, insists that the owner has a rather weird sense of asthetics as NO fence is the ultimate in that regard.
--
:)
JR

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willshak wrote:

Why should I care what people think when they look at my property? I've got to look at it every day - they can just drive on.
Neighbor friendly? That's not a reason. I could give my neighbor $10 every day - that would be the 'neighbor friendly thing to do - but obviously an insane approach. I am not responsible for his artistic sensitivities. If he doesn't like the looks of the fence, he's welcome to build his own! Heck, I'd even let him attach HIS fence to MY posts (that's the neighbor-friendly thing to do).

I agree. Chain-link, stone, brick, barbed-wire: all look the same from either side.

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on 3/8/2008 5:33 PM HeyBub said the following:

If code allows that. Since the setback may be some distance from the property line, the fences cannot be connected without violating the setback requirement. But you can do whatever you like regardless of the code, but be sure to be friendly with the neighbors. Most code violations are reported by neighbors.

--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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As long as the wood does not contact the cement, you'll be ok.
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Check out the Master Halco Postmaster. http://www.fenceonline.com/postmasterwood.html Stronger then wood and easy to hide.
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