Fence Posts - Cement or No Cement??

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"Dan Espen" wrote in message writes:
R> MICHELLE H. wrote:

I believe deer can go even higher. But my experience says they won't.
http://mysite.verizon.net/despen/fence/
I've had that 6 foot fence up since 2009 and so far, not one deer has come in the yard.
However, deer can see right through chain link. I think it's important for the view to be blocked. Deer aren't likely to jump something when they can't see where they are going to land.
I don't think 5 feet of chain link will work and I don't think you'd be able to stretch the link onto the fence if you don't use cement. You could try cementing only the end posts but if I was doing chain link, I'd use cement on all the posts.
This last year, about 7 sections of my fence were destroyed by Sandy. After the trees were removed, we had deer tracks in the yard the next day. I just finished repairs so the deer will have to eat somewhere else.
Oh, yeah, raccoons. Nothing short of land mines or electricity will keep them out. I don't grow vegetables.
--
Dan Espen

Dan..We had a raccoon problem here cleaning out the bird feeders. I solved
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On Mon, 22 Apr 2013 12:19:00 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (MICHELLE H.) wrote:

Steel posts less than 4" diameter will move all over the place without cementing them in.. Around here you go at least 3 feet down and cement 2 1/2 inch posts in a minimum 6" hole, otherwize the fence will start to lean within 2 years.
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Yeah, those raccoons are nasty as well!!! And they aren't all lovey-dovey, and cute like you see on TV or in the movies!!! The ones that come up into my backyard are HUGE!!! Last year there was about 8 of them, and they look to weigh about 40 pounds each with long 4 inch razor sharp nails. And if there are little ones, watch out, because the momma raccoon won't back down, and she will charge at you!!!!!
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You sit up a few times with a slingshot and use them for target practice, and they'll stop coming around.
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snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (MICHELLE H.) writes:

I tried to chase some off my pool deck one night. I'd push them over the side of the deck with the pool net and they'd climb right back up.
They made short work of the pool toys and floats. No idea why they felt compelled to eat the water pistols. Now I take the pool stuff inside at night.
--
Dan Espen

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On 4/22/2013 9:19 AM, MICHELLE H. wrote:

If you are ok with using an electric fence, I can tell you how I made mine. Found article on the web, but lost the link. Before I put up the fence, we had 28 deer lounging in our lawn. Now, none for the last 5 years. We protect about an acre around the house and garden, etc.
The fence is cheap and easy to put up and maintain.
Paul in Central Oregon
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Per Paul Drahn:

Are you in a suburban or rural area?
You have me thinking about doing this - but I'm in Suburbia and wonder about unintended consequences.
Seems like putting it on a timer that turns it off during daylight hours would pretty much defuse the kid issue.
--
Pete Cresswell

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MICHELLE H. wrote:

I'm not a fence type person but my next neighbor to the east has a 1200' fence along our mutual property line; wood posts and barbed wire. Been there for 17 years.
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dadiOH
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dadiOH wrote:

Meant to say, there is no concrete, just PT posts in the ground by about 24".
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dadiOH
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wrote:

4X4 wood posts (or something close) with a low tension single or 2 strand fence is very commonly done without concrete. But that's not "chain link" or steel tubular posts.
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wrote:

Barbed wire and chain link are too completely different situations.
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A 4 foot fence is perfectly adequate if it has a dog on the inside of it. Especially a terrier or a shepherd..... It is sufficient to keep out deer, raccoons, and Mexicans....
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On Mon, 22 Apr 2013 17:20:39 -0700 (PDT), Robert

Unarmed mexicans, perhaps.
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. My

acoons

My minature poodle had no problem getting over a 4 foot high fence:(
Puddle would run along the fence and LEAP over it.....
This led to many police visits and neighbor issues. :(
Finally solved with a 6 foot chainlink fence. That cost thousands.
We also tried a electric fence, she found that easy to defeat:(
She died several years ago at near 15 years old, and I still miss her. Her ashes are here to to buried with me when I die......
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On 4/22/2013 8:20 PM, Robert wrote:

I had a chuckle one day watching a Mexican soccer player zoom over an 8 ft chain link fence to retrieve a ball. It was like the fence was not even there. I figured practice makes perfect.
As for protecting from deer, a lot depends on the time of the year. During the growing season the whole world is just one big salad bar for deer. A vegetable garden has no big attraction for them. If not easy to access, bumping into a small fence or electrified fence will tend to keep them away. Certain foods they really like such as acorns, chestnuts and apples. They expend more effort to get them. In the dead of the winter they even eat the ivy along side my house but let it grow freely in summer. When they are eating your evergreens in the winter they are starving.
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We had an ornamental cherry in the front yard of our VT house. Every spring a flock of Cedar Waxwings would come by and sample the fruit, get drunk, and play Kamikaze into the windows.
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On 4/23/13 8:21 PM, Oren wrote:

There was a robin repeatedly hitting my living room window one day. I finally noticed that the window's reflection showed clear blue sky where the bird was hitting it.
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Per Robert:

This brings to mind something I've been obsessing about on-and-off for a couple of years: "YardBa"....
Everybody's heard of "RoomBa", right? i.e. the robotic vacuum cleaners that can clean a room unattended.
I'm thinking there's a market for something that would live at a charging station in the yard, sense body heat or movement or something... and spontaneously navigate towards it. Once contact was made, it would just keep on bumping up against whatever it was if it didn't move or keep following it if it did move - constrained by something like those invisible fences they use with dogs/collars.
Personally, I'd shell out a few hundred bucks for such a device... maybe more...
--
Pete Cresswell

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On 4/22/13 11:19 AM, MICHELLE H. wrote:

A bunch cut.
One thought would be plastic snow fence. Amazon link: http://tinyurl.com/d2xtg4f It's only four foot high but highly visible. Put in several T posts to hold it: http://tinyurl.com/cdpaw7c Someone already referenced a post pounder: http://tinyurl.com/brd5qzb
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I would use concrete around corner posts and gate posts, and just soil around posts in the middle of a run. Put gravel in the bottom of the hole for drainage, and stop the concrete a few inches below ground level. Try to taper the top of the concrete so water will run away from the post.

We have an ongoing love/hate relationship with deer. We really enjoy having them visit and watching the babies grow up. We don't like that they eat everything we stick in the ground. I try new "deer resistant" plants every year to see what works best, and so far they have chomped down every single "deer proof" plant except for Hellebores. They haven't so much as sniffed at those.
Anyway, deer usually won't jump into a confined area if they don't think they can get back out. I have heard that two 4' high fences spaced about 5' apart works better than a single 8' high fence.
I've never used anything more than a single 4' high fence around our vegetable gardens. Our current garden is a small 8x8 raised garden, so they're not likely to jump in there, especially with the different levels inside. Even when we had a large 30x30 garden they never jumped in to eat anything. The only time they jumped in was when they were on the run from a dog or something, but they were in and out and didn't eat anything. There's enough easier pickings around our yard for them to bother going into the garden.
Our raccoons have never expressed an interest in our garden, but we do have to keep the rabbits out.
Anthony Watson www.mountain-software.com/about.htm
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