Fence post spacing question

Tired of my fence questions yet? Be patient with me - I'm almost there. I'll be fence expert by the time I'm done with this fence :)
So, today's n00b fence building question has to do with post spacing. I have a run that is 443" long. I'm thinking of spacing the posts like this:
The left end is a corner post. The right end is a terminating post at the wall of the house. Measuring from post center to post center:
X--- 4.9' ---X--- 8' ---X--- 8' ---X--- 8' ---X--- 8' ---X
OR
X--- 7.4' ---X--- 7.4' ---X--- 7.4' ---X--- 7.4' ---X--- 7.4' ---X
The 8' spacing has narrow spacing at the corner post, decreasing the load on the corner post.
I have another run that is 260, both ends are corner posts":
X--- 7.2' ---X--- 7.2' ---X--- 7.2' ---X
OR
X--- 6.8' ---X--- 8' ---X--- 6.8 ---X
Again - we either make them evenly spaced, or we shorten the runs at the corner posts.
And lastly - on a long run, about 100 feet, is there any reason not to use 8' spacing? Is a long run susceptible to wind shear and therefore should have shorter spacing? This run runs north-south, and the prevailing wind is from the west, rarely over 10mph, gusts up to 30mph rare.
I know, I know, it's up to me, do what I want, blah blah. What would you do in the above scenarios?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ook wrote:

Unless the short section was less than 4' I would start with a full section and cut the last one to what it needed to be, putting the full piece at the end most noticed. An exception would be if you have a run on the front or 'traffic' side of the house. In that case I would probably make the two end panels even. No way I would consider cutting every panel in a run except maybe in your three panel example. All of this is of course assuming the posts are seen from both sides, if posts are only on you side then start with a full and cut the last one.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

OK, so use standard lengths except for 1) the last piece and 2) short runs like my 4 post section. That makes sense, less work, you don't have to cut stringers for every run.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ook wrote:

Assuming esthetics are not an issue: minimize the cutting.
Wind shear will not be an issue.
Helpful hints:
1. Consider placing a few pickets parallel to the ground, say 8-10-12 inches worth. When they rot out, it's easier to replace a board or two than re-construct that section of the fence.
2. Use 2.5" deck screws (stainless or anodized) instead of nails. You'll need a house-current drill with a Phillips bit and a long extension cord. Cordless drills just don't have the oomph or staying power. Get an attachement/sleeve gizmo that guides the screw in straight. Screwing is faster than nailing.
3. Buy an excess of pickets, say 10%. Stack them in your garage for an extended period* in a fashion such that they get ample air-flow. You're trying to get them as dry as possible before erecting them. If not "dry as a board" when installed, they will SHRINK and you'll end up with 1/8 - 3/8" gaps between the pickets, which not only looks tacky but allows your neighbors to peek in and watch your female family members sunbathing in the buff. Alternatively, you can watch your neighbor...
As you use your dried pickets, set aside the ones that warped or curled during storage. Return these for credit. Yes, the box stores will take them back.
(*Extended period = the longer the better. Two months should be ample, but anything is better than "from Home Depot to the post.")
4. Take pictures as you go. Keep a little diary. Report back.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You can count on that. I'm taking pics every step of the way. Every weekend I take 100-200 pics of my garden and yard and put them on my website. Today I put the stakes in the ground for where the posts go. In a week or 3 I'll rent a power auger and drill out the holes. I'll post pics as I go. It's the least I can do, besides it gives me bragging rights if it actually turns out nice :)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Somewhat disagree with this. A higher quality 18v corless has plenty of oomph. Can easily set the head of a 2 1/2 inch drywall screw into double 2x4's even too far down if the clutch is maxed. Can put the head of a screw through the plywood you are screwing down. Talking about Rigid, Milwaukee, Dewalts.
Staying power - no, can't beat electric or air for continuous work.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ook <Ook Don't send me any freakin' spam at zootal dot com delete the Don't send me any freakin' spam> wrote:

<...snipped...>
Use 8' spacing wherever possible. It is standard for pre-made fence sections. The oddball spacing is OK for a short run where you are cutting your own stringers and nailing up individual pickets, but for off-the-shelf fence sections you'd want the posts on 8' centers or you'd be cutting every section to fit.
--

Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ook wrote:

we never get tired of questions...we might get tired of typing answers :)
If you're going with pre-fab sections stick with 8' spacing, If you're building your own design I'd go custom spacing.
Your 443" & 260" sections (are those the only ones you have?) both work out nearly the same 5 sections of 88.6" & 3 sections of 86.7" . Yeah you got some waste but you're talking about 8 extra cuts and 4 extra cuts.....we spent more than that much time typing & reading.
But on the other hand if the framing isn't visible from the street & you don't mind the short section visible from the yard.....go with 8 ft sections & one short section
There are tons of ways to desigh a fence.
If you're looking for out of plane stability......see if you can work a "double top plate" or "continuous" top member of some sort into your design, Having the top member "cut" a each post gives squat for moment resistance, you wind of having a bunch of more or less independent sections.
I beefed up a dying fence with an added top members. I added 7 8ft 2x4's, put the butt joints at the midpoint between fence posts. Took an hour or so puuting deck screws. I was able to put off replacing the fence for years...each adjacent section was able to lend support to others where the posts were nearly rotted off......worked great, gave the tremites new wood to eat (at least until my neighbor accidently set fire to about 30 ft of it)
cheers Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ook <Ook Don't send me any freakin' spam at zootal dot com delete the Don't send me any freakin' spam> wrote:

Use T-posts on 20' centers with high-tensioned welded wire mesh.
Nick
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Can you electrify it? :-)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 3 Sep 2006 10:09:01 -0700, "Ook" <Ook Don't send me any freakin' spam at zootal dot com delete the Don't send me any freakin' spam> wrote:>>

Put up a sign saying "we serve fried burglars here" :-)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ook <Ook Don't send me any freakin' spam at zootal dot com delete the Don't send me any freakin' spam> wrote:

Sure, but high-tensile wire vs mesh might make more sense in that case.
Nick
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.